Permanent LinkPosted: Thu Dec 11, 2008 4:57 pm 
I was just reading up on Cointelpro and I think I have the final pieces of the puzzle put together.

It's shiny and it squirts water, is it a water gun? No a detective that makes these things told me it was a watering stick. Describe this watering stick to me. Well you pull the trigger, and water comes out and it can get people wet. Are you sure it's not a water gun? No a private detective told me that it's a watering stick, besides water guns don't squirt blue liquid and this one does. Well Ok then, and thus Cointelpro in whatever form it choose to continue in was masked as Gang Stalking.


Since Cointelpro was only ever an American program people have been saying that it can not be Cointelpro because what is happening is International. It's patterns are however the same, and with the new community policing programs and anti-terror laws it too has risen from the shadows where it momentarily dwelt, and has continued almost consistantly to do what it has always done. What's been confusing is the electronic harassment and the gaslighting tactics, but enough research will show ghost tactics have been used before, including what we now know about the former East Germany.

Recently I came across an article that I think just really helped me to put the whole thing into perspective. I think I have finally internalized it at last. I came across a story that I had not heard before. It was the story of how a young outspoken black journalist was put away by the system.
Mumia Abu-Jamal. This story starts back in the day of the black panthers, and climaxes in the early eighties and continues on to this present time. It's a leangthy story, so I will just go over the highlights, but I suggest that you read it in full. I think after reading it, you will see a pattern that has always existed and that still exists.


http://mikeely.wordpress.com/2008/12/02 ... the-state/



Quote:
At City Hall, Rizzo was blunt with the press: he expected them to close ranks in support of police actions. Then, from the crowded pack of reporters, a young Black journalist spoke out in the resonant tones of a radio broadcaster. He raised pointed questions about the official police story Rizzo had just laid out.

Mayor Rizzo exploded in fury and spat out a thinly veiled threat: “They believe what you write, and what you say, and it’s got to stop. And one day–and I hope it’s in my career–that you’re going to have to be held responsible and accountable for what you do.” [2]

The journalist who challenged Rizzo that day was Mumia Abu-Jamal. He had spent a decade exposing the racism of Philadelphia’s police and legal system.

On December 9, 1981, three years after this press conference, at the age of 27, Mumia Abu-Jamal fell into the hands of the police. He was shot, almost killed by a police bullet, arrested, and repeatedly brutalized in custody. And then, in a trial borrowed from Kafka or Alice’s Wonderland, he was condemned to death for the shooting of policeman Daniel Faulkner.

Mumia Abu-Jamal has not spent a day in freedom since. He is now on Death Row–defying the sterile isolation of the SCI Greene prison: writing, speaking out, and opening the eyes of a new generation to the injustices of the system.



Like many stories his does not begin or end there, where it will end will soon be decided by a jury of his peers? Well we know that a jury will soon make a decision in regards to his fate, but let's take you back.


Born in 1954 as Wesley Cook he grew up in the projects of Black philadelphia.

While growing up he was subjected to racism and a lot of the political unrest of that time period. He did not let that kill his spirit, infact he was able to rise above it for a time.

As a young teenager his mind was finally opened up to the true nature of the racism in his city and he joined the black pather party.

Quote:
I was grabbed by two of them, one kicking my skull while the other kicked me in the balls. Then I looked up and saw the two-toned, gold-trimmed pant leg of a Philly cop. Without thinking, and reacting from years of brainwashing, I yelled, ‘Help, police!’ The cop saw me on the ground being beaten to a pulp, marched over briskly–and kicked me in the face. I have been thankful to that faceless cop ever since, for he kicked me straight into the Black Panther Party.”[8]

In 1969, when Mumia joined the campaign to rename his school Malcolm X High, the FBI and the Philadelphia political police squad started keeping records on him, using informants and wiretaps. In the following years, their file would grow to over 800 pages.[9]



Soon he would start to write articles and for the group and draw attention to the plight of the people in his commuity.

Quote:
<b>The FBI took note, and added Mumia’s name to the ADEX index of those persons to be rounded up and interned in a national emergency.</b>



So for people wondering if the Fema lists do exist, here is proof that as far back as the 70's they had lists of those who should and should not be rounded up in case of a national emergency.

Quote:
“Mumia was, and is, a very sensitive, committed and thorough journalist. And his journalistic focus in large part was issues involving the inner city, involving the conflicts and tensions between those on the bottom of our society and those running it, and pretty much the daily affairs of the city.”

Linn Washington, veteran reporter and Temple University journalism professor [18]


His only achievement was not just helping to start up the philadelphia chapter of the black panthers at 15, he would later become an radio jounalist, and a free lance journalist, winning many community awards.


Quote:
In Philadelphia in the mid-1970s, Mumia’s work brought him into contact with the MOVE organization. MOVE, a radical utopian largely-Black organization, was formed the year Rizzo took over City Hall. Its members lived together in communal homes as an extended family, adopting the common surname Africa, and wore their hair natural, in dreadlocks. In 1974, from their base in West Philadelphia’s Powelton Village, MOVE started speaking out at political forums and organizing community demonstrations against police brutality.

In 1974 two pregnant women from MOVE were man-handled by cops until they miscarried. MOVE’s demonstrations intensified. The police responded with a campaign of “arrest on sight.” Between 1974 and 1976, there were 400 arrests of MOVE members, resulting in bail and fines of more than half a million dollars. Life Africa, a three-week-old baby, was killed during one violent police attack. [30]

By March 1978, these confrontations came to a head when Philadelphia police clamped a siege on MOVE’s home on West Philadelphia’s Powelton Avenue. Police cut off water and electricity. They set up barricades to prevent food from entering.

Armed with his tape recorder, Mumia stepped into the middle of this mounting conflict. He later said that he gave voice to the members of the MOVE organization at a time when most Black reporters ignored them, and the mainstream press simply slandered them.



The police after all the press they were getting pretended to back off, and then ofcourse staged a waco like attack on the residents. The organization members were put through a questionalble trial and placed in jail. He was one of the few journalists to ask the truly hard questions and carry out the function that a journalist is meant to perform.

Quote:
Mumia Abu-Jamal spoke out from the crowd of journalists, sharply raising questions about the way police had destroyed evidence after the raid.

Rizzo was already on edge over the increasing coverage of police brutality spreading into the mainstream press. He could feel his long-standing support in the city’s media eroding and it bothered him. [39]

But to be publicly challenged in his own press conference by a Black journalist the same day a cop had just died in a raid–that made him livid. Rizzo’s answer to Mumia’s question was a now-famous threat: “They believe what you write, and what you say, and it’s got to stop. And one day–and I hope it’s in my career–that you’re going to have to be held responsible and accountable for what you do.”


Three years later that would all come to a head, but not before he continued to live, work and rise in the community as someone who was nsightful, passionate and caring.

Quote:
In 1980, at the age of 26, Mumia was elected president of the Philadelphia chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists. The following year, he was named one of the city’s “People to Watch” by Philadelphia magazine. The article spoke of his “eloquent, often passionate and always insightful interviews.”


He was known as the voice of the voiceless. Then December 9, 1981 things all came to a head. 27 years ago.

Quote:
The events of December 9, 1981 started as a typical police stop for “driving while Black.” Just before 4 a.m., Mumia’s younger brother Billy Cook was driving his Volkswagen Beetle in a seedy part of Philadelphia’s Center City–when he was pulled over on Locust Street by Officer Daniel Faulkner.

The official record claims that the reason for this stop was a crooked license plate and a broken bumper. But before Daniel Faulkner even climbed out of his patrol car, he had decided to arrest Billy Cook and called for a police wagon to take Cook away. Faulkner quickly had Billy Cook out of the driver’s seat, spread-eagled across his car and was beating him in the head with a weighted police flashlight. [47]

Mumia was driving his cab that night and came upon this scene. Moments later, when police backup arrived, Mumia was on the ground, shot in the chest. Faulkner was dead from two gunshot wounds and Billy Cook was standing against a wall bleeding. Anyone else involved in the incident had fled.

A cop was dead and from that moment on–true to the methods, mentality and traditions of the police–Mumia was responsible and deserved to die, no matter what the evidence (or lack of evidence) might actually say.


Since then he has been in the system, fighting for a fair trail and litterally fighting for his life on death row.

Quote:
In the months that followed Mumia’s arrest, the machinery of Philadelphia’s notorious Homicide Squad went into motion–and systematically manufactured a case against Mumia Abu-Jamal. Evidence was suppressed. False evidence was created. Witnesses were coerced. And a notorious hanging judge was rolled out to ram this railroad through the trial process.

Mumia had been the dogged opponent of a brutal power structure for 12 intense and explosive years. He had exposed their crimes, upheld their victims, given voice to their accusers. Now he was in their hands–a political prisoner headed for death row.


Thus the story in part ends there, but continues now 27 years later. He has been on death row ever since then, the system then as now is the same and it has not changed. Evidence of a signed confession from another man exists from his team, suggesting that the police officer was shot in a mob style hit.

http://www.freemumia.com/beverlydeclaration.html

Abu-Jamal is still on death row waiting once again for his fate to be decided some 27 years later. Some would say that his fate was decided when he confronted the Mayor on his actions in taking down yet another group from that time period.

Quote:
We are now at the crossroads of the case. This is a life and death struggle in the fight for Mumia's freedom. His life hangs in the balance. The following are details as to what has been occurring in the Supreme Court.

Abu-Jamal v. Beard, U.S. Sup. Ct. No. 08A299: On October 3, I filed in the Supreme Court a Motion for Extension of Time to File Petition for Writ of Certiorari. Justice David H. Souter granted the motion on October 9th. The Petition is now due on December 19, 2008.


So here it is, just one more piece of the puzzle, that's finally helping me to put it all together. The full story is a fascinating read, and it answers the questions that I had when I first came online and started to learn about Cointelpro.

I had wondered why there were no more leaders like Martin Luther King Jr. I mean that time period seemed to have produced a lot of leaders and groups, such as the black panthers, Malcolm X, etc. The last two I grew up thinking of as outlandish radicals, but now I see that they were just a part of the same struggles that we are all a part of wither we know it or not.

So that answers that part of the puzzle for me. They are locked away in the system. If they are not dead, in prison, in process of being destroyed, or in mental wards as is the new thing to do, then they are simply unaware, or a part of the system itself.

Coitelpro as we see primarily targeted ethnic minorities, their leaders, political movements, and organizations, but even before Martin Luther King Jr's assassination the mandate was changing for that program. The mandate had become making sure that no (black) messiahs rose up, this would mean finding creative ways to target these future messiahs, these ones that could potentially rise up and distrupt the system, cause dissidence and throw a cog in the wheel. Those at every level who refused to fall in line.

Well the machine has continued to work, and so has the corruption and the injustice. The system that existed then, as much as I wanted to believe that it had fully changed, I am in reading and researching lead to now believe that it has never really changed. Those frieghtening tentacles still exist and instead of just targeting activists and dissidents, these programs have merged and branched out. Again in accordance with new initiatives such as community policing, anti-terror laws, etc, they are alive and well, and the machine is as active as ever. With the emergence of 9/11 and overseas wars, we are simply seeing the machine mount up and show itself more clearly, apparently this is very common, during such times from what I have read.

Abu-Jamal was known as a voice for the voiceless, he helped shed light on injustice for dozens if not thousands of people throughout his time, before the system also took him out of the picture and almost silenced his voice. Today his life still hangs in the balance, and a fair trial is needed once more. Can any justice exist in this system of corruption and conformity? It's been 27 years, and a decision is days away from being made, maybe by being a voice for his plight, and sheding some light on this case, some right can finally be achieved.


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