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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:23 am
 


Lemmy Lemmy:
One problem with this policy (along with all schoolboard anti-bullying policy) is that bullying usually doesn't happen where anyone on a school staff can do anything about it. If it happens AT school, it happens when staff aren't looking. It happens in hallways and outside the building in areas that aren't supervised. Bullied students usually don't go running to teachers to report these incidents, especially at the secondary level.

Another problem is that teachers get frustrated with administration. Teachers inform principals about incidents of bullying and it's at the ADMINISTRATIVE level where it gets minimized (PA9's comment about the guitar-strumming principal was perfectly apt). It's not the classroom teachers that are dropping the ball on this one.


What's ignored on this forum is that bullying is about more than boy on boy, one to one interaction. Even then, for some little guy to try to take on a big bully isn't going to be successful. Also, look at Brenda's case, but assume it was her son instead of daughter - would going over and punching that older kid really have resulted in success. More likely is what happened back east, where a kid knew martial arts and finally snapped and broke some kid's nose - the bullied kid is the one that got in trouble with authorities. The bullies I saw in high school operated in gangs - you really going to take on a whole gang?

I do think adults have to get involved here, but it's pretty difficult to do. One successful strategy has been to get the kinds that just stand around and watch to get involved - bullies back off if the whole group tells them it's not OK. Another might be to support the victims more - ie give them self-confidence and let them know they're not alone. But from what I understand the best strategy is involve the other students - that does seem to give results.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:29 am
 


Very exhaustive look at the problem and what to do:

http://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/res/cp/res/bully-eng.aspx

Some excerpts:

$1:
Research has shown that narrowly focused programs directed solely at bullies or their victims; situational deterrents (e.g., increasing supervision in bullying hot spots); and zero tolerance policies including school expulsion have limited effectiveness and may actually increase or exacerbate the problem (Fox et al, 2003; Mayencourt, Locke & McMahon, 2003; Pepler, Smith & Rigby, 2004; Shaw, 2001).

Both Canadian and international research stress the need for a whole school approach to bullying which includes the adoption of an anti-bullying policy and anti-bullying initiatives (Fox et al, 2003; Gottfredson, Wilson & Skroban Najara, 2002; Olweus, 1993; Pepler & Craig, 2000; Rigby, 2002; Sampson, 2002; Scheckner et al, 2002; Shaw, 2001; Smith, 2000; Sudermann, Jaffe & Schieck, 1996) [3]. The idea behind this approach, first proposed by Olweus (1993), is that the policy and the program reinforce each other and help communicate behavioural expectations for everyone involved in the daily activities of a school.

Support and commitment must start with school board directors and continue through the entire school system to include administrators, principals, secretaries, teachers, coaches and students. The following are the two main components of a whole school approach:

Development of a whole school policy; and
Development of whole school initiatives in support of the policy.


In Canadian anti-bullying initiatives, students are more likely to be involved in project delivery rather than project development. Students, usually youth, often get involved in role playing or creating a theatre piece for presentation to other students; however, it is also important to provide students with opportunities to play a more active role in developing approaches to address bullying in schools (Pepler & Craig, 2000; Shannon & McCall, n.d.). Including children and youth in the development and delivery of anti-bullying interventions is a recent, although less common, trend.

In 1999, the United States ' National Association of Attorneys General (NAAG) sponsored four "listening conferences," which involved discussions between students, teachers, administrators, parents and Attorneys General on the topic of youth violence. The conferences focused on the causes and solutions of violence among youth. The students' opinions and ideas were noted and then published in the document entitled Bruised Inside (2000). Demonstrating youth commitment and responsibility for the issue, the document emphasized the degree to which youth felt it was up to them to solve their own problems. Troubles in the home and unhealthy relationships among youth were identified contributing to youth violence. In addition, students stressed the importance of dealing with the root causes of violent behaviour and suggested possible solutions including peer mediation, after-school programs, and anti-bullying training.

These conferences demonstrated that youth have ideas about the causes of youth violence and bullying and about what interventions may be successful. It is important for these views to be taken into consideration when creating an intervention on their behalf.

A bullying incident directly involves only a handful of students but there are typically other students who are indirectly involved as bystanders (Hawkins, Pepler & Craig, 2001; Pepler, Craig, O'Connell, Atlas & Charach, 2004). Research indicates 85% of bullying incidents are witnessed by other students, yet bystanders try to stop the bullying only 11% to 22% of the time (Atlas & Pepler, 1998; Craig & Pepler, 1997). Contrary to popular belief, children who witness a bullying incident do not play a neutral role. Research states that bystanders may actually encourage and perpetuate the bullying problem; this occurs either directly, through actively joining in the bullying, or indirectly, by not taking a stand against the bully (Olweus, 1993; Pepler and Craig, 2000; Salmivalli, Huttunen & Lagerspetz, 1997; Smith & Shu, 2000; Wright, 2004). By failing to stand up to bullies, peer groups play a key role in locking bullies and victims into their respective roles (Sutton, Smith, and Swettenham, 1999). When bystanders do take an active stand, bullying is stopped within ten seconds over half of the time (Hawkins, Pepler & Craig, 2001).


Last edited by andyt on Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:31 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:29 am
 


They tend not to report it because a) they won't be taken seriously b) they'll get it worse for telling and c) bullying is ongoing; they'd likely be telling the teacher about a new incident every few minutes only to have the teacher say, "Please behave boys" and not do anything serious about it.

It would help if bullying was properly defined. I don't call it bullying everytime one kid says or does something mean to another. Bullying is ongoing humiliation and harrassment from the same source over an extended period of time.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:37 am
 


jason700 jason700:
They tend not to report it because a) they won't be taken seriously b) they'll get it worse for telling and c) bullying is ongoing; they'd likely be telling the teacher about a new incident every few minutes only to have the teacher say, "Please behave boys" and not do anything serious about it.

d) teenagers don't view teachers as persons of trust; they view them as instruments of their oppression.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:45 am
 


Most of the verbal bullying I witnessed took place in the classroom, under the teacher's nose. The teacher either didnt notice, didnt recognize it as bullying (as opposed to playful teasing), or didnt feel responsible for intervening. I know teachers, and have heard them say things like "im a teacher, not a social worker," claiming they dont have the time/resources/training to be effective. As long as its non-physical, many dont feel its their role to intervene and point the finger at parents. Others worry that intervening will onky make it worse outside of school, while yet others still have a "kids will be kids" and "they have to learn to cope for themselves" attitude.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:46 am
 


andyt andyt:
Lemmy Lemmy:
One problem with this policy (along with all schoolboard anti-bullying policy) is that bullying usually doesn't happen where anyone on a school staff can do anything about it. If it happens AT school, it happens when staff aren't looking. It happens in hallways and outside the building in areas that aren't supervised. Bullied students usually don't go running to teachers to report these incidents, especially at the secondary level.

Another problem is that teachers get frustrated with administration. Teachers inform principals about incidents of bullying and it's at the ADMINISTRATIVE level where it gets minimized (PA9's comment about the guitar-strumming principal was perfectly apt). It's not the classroom teachers that are dropping the ball on this one.


What's ignored on this forum is that bullying is about more than boy on boy, one to one interaction. Even then, for some little guy to try to take on a big bully isn't going to be successful. Also, look at Brenda's case, but assume it was her son instead of daughter - would going over and punching that older kid really have resulted in success. More likely is what happened back east, where a kid knew martial arts and finally snapped and broke some kid's nose - the bullied kid is the one that got in trouble with authorities. The bullies I saw in high school operated in gangs - you really going to take on a whole gang?

I do think adults have to get involved here, but it's pretty difficult to do. One successful strategy has been to get the kinds that just stand around and watch to get involved - bullies back off if the whole group tells them it's not OK. Another might be to support the victims more - ie give them self-confidence and let them know they're not alone. But from whHat I understand the best strategy is involve the other students - that does seem to give results.


One other aspect is the social media side. Frankly, not something we've had to deal with as kids and one that I don't think teachers can do much about. Shy of stepping away from using social media, that is where kids seem most helpless.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:49 am
 


Yes... I got detention once because a bully stole my pencil. The teacher wouldn't believe me when I told her. He was nice enough to give it back to me after class though.

Was he bigger than me? Not even close. More manipulative? Yes, and had a group of five others helping eachother in their bullying.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:52 am
 


BeaverFever BeaverFever:
Most of the verbal bullying I witnessed took place in the classroom, under the teacher's nose. The teacher either didnt notice, didnt recognize it as bullying (as opposed to playful teasing), or didnt feel responsible for intervening. I know teachers, and have heard them say things like "im a teacher, not a social worker," claiming they dont have the time/resources/training to be effective. As long as its non-physical, many dont feel its their role to intervene and point the finger at parents. Others worry that intervening will onky make it worse outside of school, while yet others still have a "kids will be kids" and "they have to learn to cope for themselves" attitude.


Even if they did intervene, there isn't much they can do without parental buy in. Some of the examPled I've seen with mine and other kids had the parents of bullies roundly denying or simply not caring. Yes, if it's bad enough the school can look at removing the bully, but that opens up a lot of other issues such where do you transfer this problem and so forth. There is a certain truth that children do have to learn how to do it because, as it has been pointed out, you will deal with bullies throughout life, but at some point, when the strategies the child has been taught to employ have failed, then they need to be able to fall back on other tools - the punch in the head for example.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:10 am
 


Oh ya dont even get me started on parents. Alot of them take it as a persor insult if theyre told anything unflattering about their kid and will refuse to accept it. Yet others will say "I tried talking to him, he doesn't listen, what more can I do." Some will use the "kids will be kids/rite of passage" excuse to minimize the problem and of course there are deadbeats that just dont care. Some or all of the above will say that whatever happens in school is strictly the school's responsibility and not theirs.


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