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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 8:14 am
 


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MONTREAL - Massive lawsuits targeting people who illegally download copyrighted content are common in the U.S., where people have been stuck with hefty fines and out-of-court settlements.

Now there's an attempt to bring that to Canada.

At the center of the effort is Canipre, the only anti-piracy enforcement firm that provides forensic services to copyright-holders in Canada.

The Montreal-based firm has been monitoring Canadian users' downloading of pirated content for several months. It has now gathered more than one million different evidence files, according to its managing director Barry Logan.

One of its clients is now before Federal Court in Toronto, requesting customer information for over 1,000 IP addresses — a user's unique Internet signature — collected by Canipre.

That client is the American studio Voltage Pictures, maker of hundreds of films including the Academy Award-winning "Hurt Locker."

On the other side of the case is Teksavvy, an Ontario-based Internet provider. The IP addresses flagged by Canipre link back to its users.

The case is set to resume next month.

If the court orders Teksavvy to hand over customer info, it could be the beginning of a new chapter in the anti-piracy battle in Canada.

"We have a long list of clients waiting to go to court," said Canipre's Logan, who estimates that about 100 different companies are paying close attention to the case.

These lawsuits have been common in the U.S. Between 200,000 and 250,000 people have been sued in the last two years, according to one Internet civil-liberties group.

"They send off threatening letters telling them, 'If you don't pay up we're going to name you in this lawsuit and you could be on the hook for up to $150,000 in damages,'" said Corynne McSherry, intellectual property director of that group, the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

Canadians don't risk such severe damages, because of a bill passed last year that modified the federal Copyright Act.

Bill C-11 imposed a limit of $5,000 on damages awarded for non-commercial copyright infringement, which applies to the average consumer who downloads films.

"The reason Parliament did that (is) they didn't want the courts to be used in this way," said David Fewer, director of the Canadian Internet Policy and Public Interest Clinic.

The advocacy group is an intervenor in the Toronto case.

"Copyright is supposed to be a framework legislation. It's not supposed to be used for building a compensation model." He says the phenomenon of file-sharing suits is relatively new in Canada.

He said there has only been a single file-sharing lawsuit in Canada, launched by the music industry. The case, BMG Canada Inc. vs. John Doe, was launched in 2004, and it failed.

Fewer said no similar attempts have been made — until now.

"I'm a little bit surprised to see this (new) litigation popping up in Canada. We typically don't have a culture in Canada for this kind of use of courts," Fewer said.

For now, Canipre is the only Canadian firm providing this type of service. And it's proud of the work it does.

"We understand the culture of piracy," Logan said, adding that he has been involved in numerous IP-related litigation cases across Canada.

"We're bringing that model up here as a means to change social attitudes toward downloading," said the Canipre executive. "Many people know it is illegal but they continue to do it."

The company advertises its ability to conduct "aggressive takedown campaigns" for clients.

It monitors websites where pirated content is known to be available, and it searches for its clients' content. When it finds violations, Canipre asks the hosting website to remove the content — a process known as a takedown request.

"By aggressive, what we're saying is, 'We don't do one or two takedown (requests), we do 1,000-2,000 at a time,'" said Logan, who lives in Ontario."We've managed to put a business process in place with a lot of the top-tier platforms that provide pirated content."

But his company services don't just include suing people. He says there's an educational message, too.

"Our collective goal is not to sue everybody... but to change the sense of entitlement that people have, regarding Internet-based theft of property."

"File Saturation" is one example of an educational message.

The firm uploads a harmless file to sharing websites which closely resembles the content users are seeking. There is one key difference: This particular file is completely useless.

The goal of that effort? Make it harder and more time-consuming to download illegally.

Logan expects Federal Court to order the Internet provider, Teksavvy, to hand over customer information.

Regardless of the outcome of the case, Logan will keep fighting against piracy.

"Litigation is not the only tool that will change piracy — it's simply a tool."

Logan wants piracy to become a taboo, much like drinking-and-driving is now.

"That's (not) the attitude here in Canada: It's a pervasive sense of entitlement," he said. "(Illegally) downloading content should also be socially unacceptable."

For now, piracy remains strong in Canada: there were more than 370,000 Bit Torrent transactions over a month — a transaction being each time a user opens a session to download a film — according to statistics gathered by Canipre for its clients.

Those statistics only include Canipre's clients, so the actual Canadian number is far higher.


http://ca.news.yahoo.com/effort-afoot-c ... 07080.html


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 8:52 am
 


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Logan wants piracy to become a taboo, much like drinking-and-driving is now.
Never going to happen. Never.

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The firm uploads a harmless file to sharing websites which closely resembles the content users are seeking. There is one key difference: This particular file is completely useless.
Thank goodness for comment sections!

I wonder if this will so blatantly become a victory for yet another giant megacorporation or if there'll be a surprise victory for the hapless people sitting at computer desks.


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:07 am
 


Piracy is thievery, plain and simple. That siad, it's so darn easy, everyone's doing it adn doing what humans do best--justifying that theya re somehow "right" doing it. Moral suasion is unlikely to work.

The market will develop it's own solution soon enough, and it won't likely involve locks.

One solution they already found, at least for songs, is artists providing free songs to check them out, and then cheap singles. I can buy the song for 99 cents, enjoy what I know will be a hi-fidelity copy (as hi as it gets for crappy mp3 anyways), and know that I'm supporting the artists (since I buy a lot of indie stuff). Or I can install crappy software, or go to some russian site crawling with malware and download the song, likely ripped by a guy whyo knows bugger-all about equalization and production.


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:07 am
 


Just use a proxy service or learn how to spoof your IP. For shits and giggles I'd recommend using this IP address when you download (whatever):

204.2.171.99

8)


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:10 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
Just use a proxy service or learn how to spoof your IP. For shits and giggles I'd recommend using this IP address when you download (whatever):

204.2.171.99

8)


Sure, but you've just added a couple of steps to PuDo's algoritm, where it's supposed to be "insert DVD, play." I think the hassle factor is way lower just buying the thing through legitimate means (though admittedly, I rarely watch movies; mostly listen to music).


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:29 am
 


Zipperfish wrote:
Or I can install crappy software, or go to some russian site crawling with malware and download the song, likely ripped by a guy whyo knows bugger-all about equalization and production.

I remember doing that... once. Trying to pirate Photoshop when I was 15 or something. One of those "crakz.ru" websites. Devastated the computer almost instantly.

I remember Kazaa and Limewire/Frostwire for downloading music as a kid, but they're very dead now. Now when I see something I like, I have an add-on for Firefox (called Universal Downloader) that can let me download videos and music from any web source and then convert it to a better format if I want to. No Russian websites.

FOr songs though, since they're really small, I don't bother with the add-on. I just take the address for a YouTube video and paste it into the form on this website (the first site you find if you ever google "YouTube to MP3")

For video and programs, torrents remain dear to my heart.


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:37 am
 


Zipperfish wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
Just use a proxy service or learn how to spoof your IP. For shits and giggles I'd recommend using this IP address when you download (whatever):

204.2.171.99

8)


Sure, but you've just added a couple of steps to PuDo's algoritm, where it's supposed to be "insert DVD, play." I think the hassle factor is way lower just buying the thing through legitimate means (though admittedly, I rarely watch movies; mostly listen to music).

Hassle to me involves getting off my ass. If I want to pay for it, I have to go to a store. I don't even know of a music store in my area of town (Except ones that sell instruments). So I'd have to go buy a disposable credit card to buy about 10 songs.

That walk would be about 30-40 minutes... I could have downloaded the entire discography to whoever I wanted to listen to, and be listening to it, within that time, for free, while sitting on my ass.

As you said, right or wrong, piracy as it is just isn't going to die or be taboo. Not when it's grotesquely convenient.

Not when D-List movies still sell for $30 at Wal-Mart.


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:41 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
Just use a proxy service or learn how to spoof your IP. For shits and giggles I'd recommend using this IP address when you download (whatever):

204.2.171.99

8)

Why Akamai?


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:43 am
 


Public_Domain wrote:
Not when D-List movies still sell for $30 at Wal-Mart.


If I was on fire and Wal Mart had a sale on fire extinguishers then I'd burn to death before I'd buy anything from them. After walking into the store, of course.

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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:43 am
 


Public_Domain wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
Just use a proxy service or learn how to spoof your IP. For shits and giggles I'd recommend using this IP address when you download (whatever):

204.2.171.99

8)

Why Akamai?


It's the IP address for the White House. 8)


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:51 am
 


Oh! Hahaha, awhile ago I found a guide on forcing Firefox to declare a different "location"; and set it to the geographic location of 24 Sussex Drive!


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 9:52 am
 


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"Our collective goal is not to sue everybody... but to change the sense of entitlement that people have, regarding Internet-based theft of property."

Too bad it won't change the sense of entitlement that large record and movie companies have.


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 10:03 am
 


Public_Domain wrote:

Image



R=UP

It's enough to drive me back to VHS!


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 10:23 am
 


At least the VHS's still work, i don't hold that much faith in the plethora of DVD's our world has lasting nearly as long.

It was relaxing, waiting for the VHS to rewind and watching the lines across the screen... And being able to fix broken tape with, well, tape.

Saw a VCR at Value Village a couple days ago. Wanted to pick it up, but all the VHS tapes we own (mostly Disney and Jim Carrey movies, and lots of Pokemon) are in some box somewhere in Alberta.


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PostPosted: Tue May 14, 2013 11:15 am
 


DVDs? Doesn't everyone just use Netflix, or Apple TV or Shaw on Demand or whatever, at this point?


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