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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:34 am
 


Quote:
The Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement Is a Dead End for Jobs

John Jacobs, Research Associate, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.

Canada used to excel at industrial strategy, but now we are satisfied with trade, and any type of trade will do. Some will say that old economic project is dead (or should be). They suggest it's futile to want to graduate up the export food chain -- from iron ore to steel, from steel to airplanes -- because "the market" demands we specialize in what we're best at. If it's oil, gold and raw materials instead of auto parts, so be it.

That hands-off mentality, which is at the heart of global trade deals like the recently concluded Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), goes some way to explaining why Canada's trade deficits are growing, faster with free-trade partners than other countries, and the job intensity of our exports is declining. It's a main reason we should not accept government claims the TPP will be good for jobs.

The trend in the employment intensity of Canadian trade was already not good. From 2000 to 2014, Canadian manufactured goods exports declined from 64 per cent to 46 per cent of total exports. Unprocessed or semi-processed commodities increased from 30 per cent to more than 50 per cent of total exports during this time, with crude oil becoming Canada's largest export to the TPP countries. This is important because not all industries create jobs equally.

An estimated 580 direct jobs can be attached to each $1 billion in exports from the extractives sector whereas the same amount of trade in manufactured goods produces 2,300 jobs -- four times the jobs creating power of extractive industries. Statistics Canada data indicates that extractives comprise 21 per cent of value-added exports but only four per cent of employment. Compare that to manufacturing, which provides 52 per cent of value-added exports and 40 per cent of employment.

There is little hope the TPP will reverse this trend and its proponents know this. Globally tariffs are at all-time lows. As a result of multilateral trade agreements (WTO) and existing Canadian FTAs, 97% of Canadian exports enter TPP countries tariff free. Because the remaining tariffs are already so low, most economists project a negligible economic upside for Canada of 0 per cent to 0.22 per cent GDP growth by 2025. This could explain why the government never released a detailed economic impact assessment before agreeing to the deal in Atlanta this week.

. . .

Ultimately, though the TPP is not about trade or increasing prosperity for most Canadians, one can understand why Canada's corporate elite are cheer-leading the deal. It entrenches their role as drivers of the Canadian economy and "consitutionalizes" their rights to profitably exploit Canada's resources. For the rest of Canadians, accepting the TPP will have long-term detrimental impacts on the prospects for full employment, economic prosperity, and the ability of Canadians to sustainably manage their economy.


http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/john-jacob ... a-business


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 7:52 am
 


Time for the plebs to listen up.

Canada is a small country, a very small country.

So, TPP will go the same way as the GST, Free Trade with the US and then Mexico,
C-51, deals with China, the price of oil, and TTIP as well.

These deals were all decided in spite of whatever public opinion was, because public opinion doesn't matter.
Especially Canadian public opinion, because we are a small country.


It's not about politics, because everyone has signed on to it. It's about money.

Anyone who thinks Mulcair will actually change anything in these deals is a deluded idiot.
Just make sure to vote extra times so you can be extra humiliated when it doesn't change. :lol:

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/com ... 79688.html
Is a UK opinion about TTIP; no promotion in the press, no public consultation, no votes or referendums, no information about it at all.


Because you are not allowed to have an opinion, or a voice. There is too much money at stake
for little people like you.

Now, back to work.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 8:01 am
 


martin14 wrote:
These deals were all decided in spite of whatever public opinion was, because public opinion doesn't matter.


The deal was actually done in complete secrecy, so that the public won't have any knowledge of it. The text of the deal, which was to be released tomorrow, won't be available before the election.

But the many, many leaks of the text of the deal do not make it very appealing. My rough count was the word 'citizen' appeared twice in the agreement, but 'consumer' appeared hundreds of times.

https://wikileaks.org/tpp/

"Drawers of water and hewers of wood" will be set in concrete.

https://www.eff.org/issues/tpp


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 8:31 am
 


FTA with the US, NAFTA they were all done in secrecy. Kind of the point isn't it?


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 8:53 am
 


uwish wrote:
FTA with the US, NAFTA they were all done in secrecy. Kind of the point isn't it?


Call me old fashioned, but I like to know up front what my government is doing in my name. I didn't agree with secrecy then, and I don't agree with it now.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:15 am
 


Nice to see the new LPC will operate the same as the old LPC...and the CPC.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:26 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
uwish wrote:
FTA with the US, NAFTA they were all done in secrecy. Kind of the point isn't it?


Call me old fashioned, but I like to know up front what my government is doing in my name. I didn't agree with secrecy then, and I don't agree with it now.



:lol:

Ask yourself how much the BNA Act or the Statutes of Westminster were negotiated or
discussed in public.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:43 am
 


ShepherdsDog wrote:
Nice to see the new LPC will operate the same as the old LPC...and the CPC.



Oh you mean this... http://www.canadaka.net/link.php?id=93230
http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/canada- ... -1.3272049

Nothing changes.

:lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:46 am
 


Yup....the LPC claims to be different......different corporate sponsors is all.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 9:48 am
 


Hard to blame the politicians for being unpatriotic when most of the population is willing to sell out as much as they can for cheap clothes at Walmart and inexpensive electric gadgets manufactured by slaves. :|


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 10:02 am
 


martin14 wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
uwish wrote:
FTA with the US, NAFTA they were all done in secrecy. Kind of the point isn't it?


Call me old fashioned, but I like to know up front what my government is doing in my name. I didn't agree with secrecy then, and I don't agree with it now.



:lol:

Ask yourself how much the BNA Act or the Statutes of Westminster were negotiated or
discussed in public.


Because they had the newspapers and the Internet back then. :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 11:22 am
 


Five days before the election, and finally there's discussion of one actual issue!
Yay! If you're Tory here's something actually important besides niqabs, crime and Muslims.
Obviously as I support our democratic right to support the rules of business through elected gov'ts I'm not jumping on board. I've always felt trade deals with counrites that have similar standards to ourselves was preferable (USA, Australia, N Zealand, EU, even Japan) than handing off those values to obtain cheap labour and goods.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 11:33 am
 


herbie wrote:
I've always felt trade deals with countries that have similar standards to ourselves was preferable (USA, Australia, N Zealand, EU, even Japan) than handing off those values to obtain cheap labour and goods.


Hear hear! In this one, we deal as equals with places like Brunei and Malaysia while ignoring their deplorable human rights and labour standards.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 12:32 pm
 


herbie wrote:
Five days before the election, and finally there's discussion of one actual issue!
Yay! If you're Tory here's something actually important besides niqabs, crime and Muslims.
Obviously as I support our democratic right to support the rules of business through elected gov'ts I'm not jumping on board. I've always felt trade deals with counrites that have similar standards to ourselves was preferable (USA, Australia, N Zealand, EU, even Japan) than handing off those values to obtain cheap labour and goods.



Well, I am open to talking about anything you want Herbie...those above three bullet points in no way shape my electoral vote. For me taxes is a key indicator, ie I don't want to pay anymore. While I don't like niqabs, to be honest I could care less, crime is going up slightly but that is a given during any major economic downturn. And Muslims, well I think it is well known I don't care much for religions, it is the scourge of a modern society...but that doesn't mean I dislike Catholicism or Judaism any less! As Bart pointed out, I am an equal opportunity hater when it comes to religions.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2015 1:18 pm
 


DrCaleb wrote:
herbie wrote:
I've always felt trade deals with countries that have similar standards to ourselves was preferable (USA, Australia, N Zealand, EU, even Japan) than handing off those values to obtain cheap labour and goods.

Hear hear! In this one, we deal as equals with places like Brunei and Malaysia while ignoring their deplorable human rights and labour standards.

In entering trade deals with countries like these, we are also exporting our values. Those countries will never do better unless we show them the error of their ways. Trade deals give these people the chance to go to work and improve their economic welfare. Once they start to have economic success, then they'll want something better for their kids, so they begin to demand education. And when people are educated, they're much less likely to stand for human rights violations.

And in strictly economic terms, the greater difference between countries, the greater possible benefits from trading.


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