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PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:27 pm
 


Late 80's are when the 24's arrived. Before that it was cases only.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 2:11 am
 


A case or a poverty pack were the only choices


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 2:17 am
 


martin14 wrote:
SprCForr wrote:
Lemmy wrote:
...and Albertans call a 12-pack "a case". ROTFL


All westerners do. 2-4's are a relatively new thing.



I think it's a shot at westerner's drinking 'inabilities' ;)


Once upon a time a 24 meant you'd already had a swig from your 26 ouncer or the 40 pounder was gettin' close to being halfway done...or the three guys from Ontario were in intensive care puking their livers out....or the newf just finished his first sip.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2012 6:47 am
 


Around here, it's "une caisse de bière". [B-o]


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 12:19 pm
 


Jonny_C wrote:
pineywoodslim wrote:
No different in Canada I guess.


I don't really know. Maybe someone else can chime in here.

Ohio is another cheap booze state. When I was in Dayton a couple of years ago, I paid I think $15 for a Texas mickey (66 oz.) of Canadian Rye.

I actually asked the cashier if the bottles were on the wrong shelf.


My limited experience is that certain provinces appear to take a hard view about inter-provincial imports, just as some states do.

I recently took a ferry from St. Barbe, Nfld, to Blanc Sablon, Quebec, and there were large signs at the Newfoundland side warning about taking liquor from Quebec into Newfoundland without paying the appropriate provincial tax. I have no clue whether that's true elsewhere in Canada.

I was at a store here in Iowa the other day and 1.75 liters of Canadian Club was $22.00. Never realized that hard liquor in the US was so comparatively cheap. A bargain I suppose for Canadians.

I rarely if ever drink hard liquor, now I'm thinking I should, just to take advantage of the price! :lol:

Ain't it something? A thread on "everyone wants to be us" devolves into what nation/province/state has the cheap booze. Forget nationalism, forget civic pride, posters have hit on the important things! :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 12:32 pm
 


Welcome to CKA


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 5:57 pm
 


pineywoodslim wrote:
I recently took a ferry from St. Barbe, Nfld, to Blanc Sablon, Quebec, and there were large signs at the Newfoundland side warning about taking liquor from Quebec into Newfoundland without paying the appropriate provincial tax. I have no clue whether that's true elsewhere in Canada.


Maybe it's got something to do with the ferries. And maybe it's a regulation that is honoured more in the breach than the compliance. I can't see police in any province stopping a vehicle to check for out-of-province booze. Ditto for flight luggage. Your luggage doesn't go through the equivalent of a customs check for a domestic flight.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 11:37 pm
 


I have never been so pissed off as the time I had to leave several cases of Alpine Lager at the border station in Houlton Maine. At the time you could only buy Alpine in the Maritimes.I had actualy researched the U.S. Customs laws before I made the purchase. The U.S. government said I could bring in one case duty free, and pay duty on the rest. I purchased eight cases for the trip back to Boston. I was ready to pay the duty,as I had declared the lager at entry. The customs agent told me that the State of Maine had a law against the transport of more than one case of beer through the State of Maine. I told the guy that he was an employee of the federal government, and not the State of Maine. It was not his job to enforce the laws of the State of Maine. He gave me some bullshit story how he would have to inform the Maine State Police about my illegal bootleging operation. I could go to jail, and have my car impounded. I ended up leaving seven cases at the border. I do not recall the actual cost, but it was steep. :cry: Someone in Houlton had a good weekend on my dime.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 21, 2012 11:41 pm
 


SprCForr wrote:
Late 80's are when the 24's arrived. Before that it was cases only.

Let's get this straight, a two-four IS a case. :lol:
When I was in Edmonton back in '87, I was flabbergasted that you could only get beer in 12's. On the plus side, it tasted a helluva lot better than the dreck that was brewed in Ontario.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:04 am
 


pineywoodslim wrote:
Jonny_C wrote:
Yes, beer is cheaper in the States but not by as much as liquor.

Florida in March - 66 oz of Canadian whisky - $13.00

Ontario - 66 oz. - $54.00

Four for the price of one in Florida.


Wow, that's a big difference. I am originally from Louisiana, and Florida was always known as a really cheap liquor state, but not that much so.

So much for free trade between nations, eh?


The difference is sin taxes - here alcohol and cigarettes are taxed like crazy by the government.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:08 am
 


PublicAnimalNo9 wrote:
SprCForr wrote:
Late 80's are when the 24's arrived. Before that it was cases only.


Let's get this straight, a two-four IS a case. :lol:
When I was in Edmonton back in '87, I was flabbergasted that you could only get beer in 12's. On the plus side, it tasted a helluva lot better than the dreck that was brewed in Ontario.


For the younger generation perhaps - for us old fogies, a 12 pack will always be a case. Heck, most people I know call a 2-4 a flat, not a pack or even a 2-4.

FYI, back in '87, the government still ran the liquor stores (and made a boatload doing it), so there was no reason for them to sell us 2-4s when they could gouge us on 12 packs.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:14 am
 


bootlegga wrote:
pineywoodslim wrote:
Jonny_C wrote:
Yes, beer is cheaper in the States but not by as much as liquor.

Florida in March - 66 oz of Canadian whisky - $13.00

Ontario - 66 oz. - $54.00

Four for the price of one in Florida.


Wow, that's a big difference. I am originally from Louisiana, and Florida was always known as a really cheap liquor state, but not that much so.

So much for free trade between nations, eh?


The difference is sin taxes - here alcohol and cigarettes are taxed like crazy by the government.

First thing the Canadian border officers ask you when you come back from the US: "Any alcohol or cigarettes?", where the US border guards ask when you go to the US: "Any meat?"


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:14 am
 


PublicAnimalNo9 wrote:
Let's get this straight, a two-four IS a case. :lol:
When I was in Edmonton back in '87, I was flabbergasted that you could only get beer in 12's. On the plus side, it tasted a helluva lot better than the dreck that was brewed in Ontario.


You should have put a smiley after the last part too. :wink:

Maybe it was the company that made it taste better. Everybody knows that Ontarians are self-centered assholes and they're no fun to drink with. :twisted:


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:20 am
 


bootlegga wrote:
The difference is sin taxes - here alcohol and cigarettes are taxed like crazy by the government.


Driving is a sin too, judging by the taxes on gasoline.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 22, 2012 8:29 am
 


Brenda wrote:
First thing the Canadian border officers ask you when you come back from the US: "Any alcohol or cigarettes?", where the US border guards ask when you go to the US: "Any meat?"


I was ready for that, and the usual "citrus fruit" question, but the last time my wife and I went across for a holiday in Florida, I was floored when the US border guard asked "What are you bringing with you?"

Where do you start? I didn't want to appear unco-operative so I just started listing off anything I could think of until he said, "OK, go ahead".

Coming back into Canada on that same trip, the Canadian border guard didn't even ask if we had anything to declare, or if we had booze or cigarettes, which was also strange.

I think they change it up every once in a while and gauge your reaction. I assume they're good at sniffing out malfeasance. :mrgreen:


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