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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 4:03 pm
 


[align=center]The History of Canadian Bilingualism

Speech delivered by Nick Vandergragt - November 4, 2007[/align]

In order to understand the current situation surrounding the present bilingualism debate, we first need to know a little bit of history. It is only by knowing what went before, that we can frame the discussion today, in its proper context. So let’s go back to Upper Canada, just before the battle that started it all, the British victory at the Plains of Abraham.

The British are engaged in a titanic struggle for global domination with an old foe. The French are masters of Europe and of huge tracts of North America, while Britain rules the waves. It is a clash of titans that literally lasts for several hundred years and will not see its parallel until the cold war of the 20th century. The fight between the British and the French, consumes vast tracts of timber, untold mountains of gold, and most importantly, much human blood. The struggle as it unfolds in North America is as much about Britain securing virtually limitless amounts of pine and oak for the Royal Navy, as it is about increasing the geographical scope of the Empire. France for its part, desperately needs more territory, confined as it is, by the physical limits of Europe. It also needs the wealth that comes from a rather unusual source. Beaver pelts. The French voyageur paddles his way through vast stretches of the interior with his huge canoe to bring the furs to the ports of Quebec, and Montreal, so that the merchants can satisfy the seemingly endless demand of the fickle fashion world. More than that, France is also in a position to exploit the Grand Banks, and outposts are established on St Pierre and Miquelon, as well as Louisburg in modern day Cape Breton. So this is the geopolitical backdrop that paves the way for the relatively small scale, but empire shaping military campaign that permanently changes the fortunes of millions of people for generations.

Rather than recount the actual battle itself, suffice it to say that by ingenuity, daring and luck, the young British General James Wolfe, and his army of about 4,000 men climb up a narrow path upriver from Quebec city, and in a fight that lasts all of 20 minutes, defeats the French General Montcalm and his force of 4,500. As the smoke clears, the young English commander who masterminded the brilliant victory still studied by military colleges around the world to this day lies dead on the field. General Wolfe doesn’t live to see it, but that short battle finally wrests control of North America from the French, once and for all.

What comes of this is somewhat unique in the arena of military conquests. In a historical sense, the winner usually executes the leadership of the vanquished, and enslaves the population, ensuring that within a few generations, the conquered are assimilated. This doesn’t happen in this case. The British allow the French to retain their language and culture as well as their religion, and in that act of mercy, sow the seeds of discontent that will manifest itself in unrest, revolution and political upheaval still felt to this day.

After the battle everyone gets on with their lives. The peasant farmers who have come to “New France” continue to farm along the banks of the St Lawrence as they have done for years. They go to mass on Sunday, and live a simple provincial life. They chafe under the rule of the British, who give control of the newly won territory over to a Governor General, and immigrants coming in from England are given preferential treatment when it comes to land grants, political office, and influence in governance. From the English perspective it only makes sense. Language is a barrier that need not be a problem if the French are held at arm’s length. Their merchants are doing well, and the farmers coming from Britain are doing better than the French peasants are, simply because they adapt to new ideas and innovation in agriculture more readily than the French do. Things like crop rotation and using animal manure for fertilizer make the English more prosperous than their counterparts. This isn't to say that the French are stupid or lazy, far from it. They are just more resistant to change and are more entrenched in tradition than the British. The consequences are that the English farms continue to improve over time, while the soil tilled by the French, is gradually worn down, making the disparity between rich and poor, English and French, even more pronounced.

Now we jump ahead a few decades. It is the mid 1830's the trickle of immigrants from Europe is turning into a flood that brings more than ambition and a desire to start a new life. It also brings cholera. Quebec City is hit hard. There is very little in the way of sanitation, and almost no facilities for the sick and dying that are being unloaded after a transatlantic voyage that can last for weeks and has already caused much suffering and death, through filthy conditions, scurvy, and rough weather. The meager means of dealing with the outbreak are quickly over run, and with few options, a quarantine hospital is established on Grosse Isle just east of the city in the St. Lawrence.

Thousands are off loaded from ships bound further upriver, many either already dead or too far gone to be helped. It turns into a death camp and overworked doctors and frustrated ships’ captains, turn a blind eye to many who should be put ashore. The merchants need the ships emptied out as quickly as possible to reload with lumber, fish, fur and a host of other commodities all bound for the far off markets of Europe. They don't want any time wasted at Grosse Isle, no matter the reason. The misery is by no means confined to the island and those who are already ashore, but with no hope of either being granted land, or finding work, walk upriver towards Montreal several hundred miles away hoping to find better conditions. Things are no better here than in Quebec City. To make matters worse, the crops in the St Lawrence valley fail. The wheatfly, caterpillar, and grasshopper devastate much of the food supply, making starvation a very real prospect. Now add to this volatile mix, young, bright, well educated Frenchmen who increasingly see the English as the source of their problems. Men like Louis Joseph Papineau, the most influential Francophone of his day. Jean Oliver Chenier is also a prominent leader and, along with other men of this kind, begin to question English dominance of the legislative assembly, and of every other facet of life. They will not be dismissed lightly. For their part, the British make no attempt to conceal their efforts to “swamp the French and assimilate them” by means of immigration and denial of say over their own affairs, and under this dark cloud, it isn't long before there is the heavy smell of gun smoke in the air. It is 1837, and revolution has come to Canada.

The uprising is actually several smaller events, each swatted down by the British army and local loyalists. The rebels are fed with empty promises, faltering leadership, and alcohol. What it achieves, is pointless bloodshed, and needless misery. Many towns are left a smoldering ruin, as the British army engages in several sharp bloody battles with the “patriots” who are ill equipped to deal with the well armed and highly disciplined red coats. The King’s regiments identify rebel homes and those of their sympathizers and put them to the torch, the flames leaping from town to town on either side of the river. Both sides commit sins and travesties and both sides feel that they are in the right, justifying their actions.

While the French may have legitimate grievances, they are simply outgunned, out led and out maneuvered right from the start. It is reasonable to say that the rebellion is really the final chapter of the Battle of the Plains of Abraham, played out nearly 100 years after the fact.

Religious friction still exists between the Catholic French and the Protestant English, a legacy lingering from the days of reformation, old hatreds finding fertile ground. But for a while at least the rebellion of 1837 has let off some steam, and the situation cools. The tension that caused it is never far from the surface and it will make itself known in slightly less violent ways in years to come.

No discussion of this issue could be complete without mentioning the impact of the NW rebellion and the execution of its leader, Louis Riel. He is an enigma to say the least. Riel is the leader of the Métis in Saskatchewan, and is elected to Parliament 3 times but never takes his seat. He leads 2 short lived uprisings, the first in 1869 -70 and the second in 1885. Riel is captured by the Canadian army, and is hung in November. Prime Minister Macdonald refuses to suspend the sentence of death saying that “I would not commute his sentence if every dog in Quebec barked for it.” This leads to 2 separate but significant consequences. On the one hand, the Rebellion saves the imperiled CPR by demonstrating its ability to allow for the rapid deployment of troops to troubled areas, and even more importantly, it is viewed in Quebec as the murder of a French Canadian Catholic, by an English Protestant Prime Minister. Macdonald has created a martyr. This attitude leads to the formation of a political party within Quebec called the “party Nationale” and is founded by Honore Mercier who just happens to be the Province’s Premier. This is the first time a party is begun that is dedicated to the secession of Quebec, but it will not be the last. Add to this the marginalization of the Catholic religion in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. This naked anti-Catholism is highlighted by situations like the Manitoba school question. None of this is lost on the Francophone population that feels more embattled than ever. It will be decades before this anti-Catholic bias finally exits the stage of Canadian politics.

One of the biggest challenges that have always haunted every Prime Minister from Macdonald to Harper is the “Quebec issue”. How do you govern a country as physically massive as this one, and that consists of two groups of people who look at life and the world they live in, from two entirely different perspectives? The man who solves that question has yet to be born, so in the meantime, the substitute plan is to try to appease that faction within Quebec that continuously threatens to tear apart the country.

As I have already outlined, there are times when the complaints, have not only been legitimate, but grievous. The old, festering resentment of one side towards the other has made a blending and integration of the two cultures into a more seamless homogenous mass, nearly impossible. That isn't to say that this blending never happened at all. There are many cases where those of the English tongue have intermarried and adopted the Franco culture. A quick look at the list of prominent citizens in that province’s history will reveal many names that are not French in origin. But for the most part, the French stay on one side of the fence and the English glare back from the other.

At the dawn of the 20th century there is war brewing. Canada sends a contingent of troops to help the British in South Africa. The French see little reason to send their sons to fight for the Empire in some far off land that poses no threat to them directly, so once again, the cracks in the foundation of Confederation reveal themselves. Mercifully the conflict is relatively short, and because of the success of our soldiers on the battlefield, the issue blows over. It appears again to a lesser degree at the outbreak of World War One, but isn't the problem it might be and many French Canadian units distinguish themselves for bravery in the fight to rid Europe of the Kaiser and his nefarious plans.

At this point, things are beginning to change for the French. In 1927 postage stamps become bilingual, in 1934 the Federal Translation Bureau is established by an act of Parliament, and in 1936, banknotes are made bilingual as well. While these things are merely tokens and may not be the best way to soothe over the old wounds, they do indicate a shift in official attitudes towards the inhabitants of “La Belle Province”.

In 1939, war breaks out again in Europe bringing to a close, the dirty thirties with its drought, and world wide depression. As in the First World War, some French Canadians simply want no part of the fight, and hide in the bush of Northern Quebec. But again, generally speaking, Francophones respond to the threat of Nazism, and distinguish themselves in the conflict with many acts of heroism, coming from units such as the Royal 22nd Regiment, commonly known as the Vandoos, and Le Regiment de le Chaudière.

But even the fiery furnace of war will not end the sense of division that continues to simmer in Quebec. With the Fascists in Europe defeated and the rising sun of Japan setting permanently in the Pacific, the troops come home, and other than making up for lost time creating the baby boom, things pick up where they left off the day the war began.

The genesis of the modern situation can be said to be the Richard Riots that broke out in Montreal on the 17th of March 1955. Violence breaks out when Clarence Campbell suspends the famous hockey player for assaulting a referee. The level of anger far outweighs any perceived transgression to a star forward from the Montreal Canadians. The old bitterness, anger and dissatisfaction that caused the revolution of 1837 and the Riel rebellions with all their ghosts, comes roaring back, manifesting themselves in the carnage on St. Catherine street.

It isn't hard to understand the sense of isolation and grievance that leads to the riots. Other than the half hearted gestures from the 20's and 30's, little has changed from the days before Confederation. English still dominates the halls of power. Many unilingual French cannot communicate with their government when the need arises and getting a job within the public service is simply out of the question for someone who can't speak English. But as the song says, “times, they are a changin”

Simultaneous interpretation of debates in the House of Commons in both languages begins in 1959, and so too does the quiet revolution. While this is the secularization of Quebec society, it is also the resurrection of the separatist movement. Up until this point, the most powerful single voice within Quebec has been the Catholic Church. Priests have long since assumed the role of the old Seigneurs in caring for their flock, and advising them not only on matters of the soul, but on every aspect of life, including politics. Now Quebecers begin to reject the teachings of the church, and the input of the priesthood. A sense of rebellion is building again, this time it will not be one of canons and bloodshed. If the Richard Riots re-ignite the fuse of separatism, then “Vive Quebec Libre!” is the explosion that follows.

That famous sentence, or infamous if you prefer, rang out in Montreal on the steps of city hall on July 24th 1967, from French President Charles de Gaulle who was on a state visit, during a tour of the city. On one hand, English speaking Canada is outraged that a foreign head of state would so openly meddle in Canadian internal affairs, and Prime Minister Pearson responds furiously that “Canadians do not need to be liberated”. On the other hand, Separatists scream their delight at what they see as a legitimization of their cause. It is exactly what men like Rene Leveque need to hear, and from that moment on, separatism is a fact of life in Quebec.

Years before, the Pearson government had established a commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism. It was set up in 1961 and is chaired by Andre Larendeau of Le Devoir, and Davidson Dunton, President of Carleton University. The initial report is published in 1965, and the final one released in 1969. From its recommendations come the first Federal Bilingualism Act with its three guiding principles:

A: The equality of English and French in Parliament

B: the preservation of official language communities in Canada

C: The equality of French and English in society.

Lofty goals indeed. In 1970, New Brunswick becomes the country’s first and only officially bilingual province.

In October of that year, the FLQ crisis erupts in violence and Prime Minister Trudeau invokes the War Measures Act at the request of Premiere Robert Bourassa and of the Mayor of Montreal, Jean Drapeau, as a means of reining in militant separatists. When it is over, a bomb has gone off in Ottawa claiming a life and Pierre Laporte, the Quebec Provincial Minister of Labour has been kidnapped and murdered, while the RCMP is rocked by scandal surrounding their tactics during the emergency. As the decade progresses, the Federal government, begins to try to make amends for past wrongs by granting contracts to Quebec firms, establishing offices in that province with little or no regard to whether or not the move or the contract is justified, and slowly but surely working towards the day, when French, not English, is the “unofficial' language on Parliament hill. There are those who feel that Prime Minister Trudeau cares more about advancing the cause of Quebec at the expense of the rest of the country than he does about almost anything else. In spite of this, the Separatists led by the likes of Rene Leveque, continue to agitate and push for breaking free from Confederation. The Parti Quebecois is formed in the late 1960's and wins the provincial election in 1976. One side effect of this victory by the PQ, is an exodus on a mass scale of Anglo Quebecers from the province. They are similar in many ways to the loyalists who left America 200 years earlier.

The term used by the PQ to describe their nationalistic objective, is Sovereignty Association. This is supposed to be a loose union with Canada that allows Quebec maximum autonomy, without going through the nasty business of actually parting company. The Parti Quebecois holds a referendum on May 20th 1980 on the issue. They lose by a 60/40 split.

As time passes, the incremental implementation of French as the working language continues to seep into every crack and corner of the Federal government. In spite of the tide turning in their favour in Ottawa, the Separatists that are supposed to be appeased by all this are regrouping and preparing for the next attempt at dragging Quebec out of Canada.

Another milestone on this long road is the suspension of the BNA Act, and its replacement with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the Constitution in 1982. Prime Minister Trudeau is its mastermind, and it is signed and ratified by every province, except for Quebec. Premiere Rene Leveque refuses to sign it, saying he was excluded and decamped at the hands of his fellow Premieres during a night of discussions that comes to be known as the “Night of the long knives”. Despite his posturing and public pouting, the repatriation of the Canadian Constitution and the Charter is popular amongst his constituents. Prime Minister Mulroney attempts to get Quebec on board twice. The first attempt is the Meech Lake Accord of 1987 and again in 1992 with the Charlottetown Agreement. Both attempts fail, setting the stage for the second referendum on separation in 1995.

The Separatists, led by Lucien Bouchard start well behind the “No” forces within the population. Polls put the “Yes” side behind, trailing the “No” campaign which leads with 67% support. Many people in the Province are under the impression that if they embark on this path, they will continue to use a Canadian passport, and even elect representatives to send to Ottawa. Nothing is done by the Provincial government to correct these attitudes. It suits them to keep people in the dark about the real ramifications of what separation would mean. Several blunders by the “No” forces and Mr. Bouchard's bout with flesh eating disease that costs him a leg, combine to reverse the “Yes” fortunes. The fact that Mr. Bouchard has survived a near death experience gives the Separatists something to rally around. Within a few days of the referendum, the “Yes” crowd has a 5% lead. The “No” forces respond first with a 10,000 man rally, and later the famous 100,000 man rally in Montreal just days before the vote. Dozens of dignitaries speak passionately to Quebecers, appealing to them directly asking them to stay. The NO side wins by less than 1%.

To say that this is the single most important electoral event since Confederation, is to put it mildly.

The defeat finally silences the Separatist forces. They never truly surrender, but their influence in Quebec has been dealt a serious blow. In the halls of Ottawa, the tentacles of bilingualism are reaching ever deeper into the mindset of Capital hill.

In the midst of the turmoil, the Bloq Quebecois is established in 1990 as a Federal party whose whole purpose is to forward the cause of separation. Not as an agitating force from the outside, but as members of federal Parliament, doing their work and promoting their cause from inside the House of Commons itself. Many Canadians feel a sense of shock and disbelief that the institution whose primary job, is to promote Canadian unity and defend the Confederation, is now home to a group who seek the destruction of that organization. To add insult to injury, their paycheques are drawn from taxpayers from all across the country, not just from Quebec. In the election of 1993, the voters of Quebec send 54 Bloq representatives to Ottawa.

At the turning of the 21st century, the situation has almost been totally reversed from what it was in bygone days. Quebec has become a unilingual French-only province, enacting anti-English legislation such as Bill 101, which discriminates against the use of English in every facet of life outside the private residence. A language police is instituted and goes about antagonizing English merchants with over zealous application of restrictions on signs and advertizing. They insist on making sure that any English on a sign where the public can see it must be accompanied by French that is twice the size as the English words and are in the dominant place. Even major retailers are not spared. In Ottawa, civil servants must either learn French and pass a test to be promoted within the government, or face career stagnation. When hiring, Francophone English standards are much lower than Anglophone French standards are. This slants the field heavily in favour of hiring towards those who are Francophone, making it nearly impossible to get a job within government if the applicant doesn't have French as their mother tongue. In unilingual English Ontario, there are now banking institutions and even health clinics in the eastern end of the province that either employ a policy of discouraging Anglo participation, or refuse English membership outright. Signs on highways and byways are in both languages, despite the fact that less than 20 per cent of the population identifies itself as Francophone, and many of these can read and write English fluently. The Provincial government has set up organizations within Queen’s Park, to look after Francophone rights, even though there has been no hue and cry for such action.

At this juncture, everything that was legitimately considered grievances by the French has long since been rectified. Now it seems that as stated a moment ago, the situation has been turned on its head. This begs the question. If the complaints of the Francophone of days gone by were legitimate, is it not fair to say that the roles have been reversed and Anglophones have a right to many of the grievances Quebecers traditionally complained of? To make a list of all the examples of situations where a bias against Anglophones at the federal, to a lesser degree on the provincial, and even at the municipal level here in Ottawa, would take more time than your patience would allow. Suffice it to say, that if it was unacceptable in the past to discriminate based on language, then it is unacceptable now. There is no difference in value between the English and French languages to the fair and equitable mind. Both cultures, Franco and Anglo, have contributed immeasurably to this great country, in times of peace, turbulence, and even war. To put one above the other for no other reason than political correctness is an injustice beneath both cultures.

So if all this is true, what do we do about it? Knowing our history is only helpful if we can learn from it and avoid the injustices of the past. I think it reasonable and realistic to continue to insist that both sides be treated fairly by every elected official at every level of government. In areas where we have one language more prevalent than another, then that should be the tongue in which services are rendered with access available in the minor language where numbers warrant. By adopting this policy, everyone in the country can access any level of government in the language that they prefer, without the immense cost of providing it everywhere in both all the time. There is no need for every word, image or transmission to be in English and in French if the area or group being served does not require that level of service. To do otherwise, is a waste of precious resources and contributes to the financial burden of running the country to say nothing of aiding those who have as their agenda, the turning of Canada into a Francophone state.

Consider this. In the Armed Forces, every manual and technical document must be in both tongues, despite the fact that it is mandatory for all members of the service to speak and read English at a functional level. Many of the manuals come from either the United States or Britain and must be translated and reprinted before they are distributed. It is a major expenditure for the government that is totally unnecessary in light of the linguistic requirements I have already outlined. After all, is the job of the military to defend the country, or to provide work for translators?

So our job as citizens is really twofold. First we must continue to insist on reasonable programs that meet the need of both languages, and second, we must persist demanding an end to wasteful programs that are more divisive than anything else. We cannot lose sight of the fact that those who oppose this ideology of language fairness are our brothers and sisters. The people in Quebec, who don't understand or agree with the attitude I have outlined, are still Canadians. They deserve to be treated with respect and dignity due any member of this country, even if we disagree passionately with their outlook. Let us not forget that much French Canadian blood was spilled on foreign battlefields to win our freedom and that French blood is no less precious than the Anglo blood that was spilled as well.

You all have been very patient while I have tried to lay out this fascinating aspect of our history, and for that I thank you. It is my hope that you will leave here with a better understanding of the issue, and feel invigorated to go out and continue the fight for a reasonable and fair language policy for both English and French. Not because of a feeling of resentment or anger towards your fellow citizen, but because it is the right and noble thing to do. This country is worth fighting for. I applaud your efforts, and with that let me close this talk as I close every conversation I hold with the public. Ubi Caritas Et Amoure, Deus ibi Est. Good afternoon, God bless, don't let anything disturb your peace, and may you have a fair wind and a following sea.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 5:55 pm
 


How did this clown ever get published?

What a crook......

I will address just a few of his revisionist lies.

Quebec (New France) was not defeated on the Plains of Abraham in 1759. That occurred a year later when General Amherst finally reduced Montreal.

It was not so much tactics or trickery that decided the result or Britains mastery of the seas (That came after 1815).

In 1759, New France and the french (about 80,000) were attempting to contain 1,000,000 english speakers in the 13 colonies with a series of forts on the St Lawrence, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
Doomed from the start they were simply outnumbered from the start------a minority statis in North America which have never really changed.

The French also were trying to farm land which was and still is sub-marginal due to soil type, drainage and short frost free season. In short they settled in the wrong place.

Quebec's "quiet revolution" was not so much against TROC (The Rest Of Canada) so much as a leftist inspired revolt against the crushing domination of the Roman Catholic Church. Canada's laws made the tithe a voluntary donation and the church had no resort to military inforcement. Overnight things changed.
A visit to St Anne de Beaupre gives a good impression of how the habitant were improverished to construct a massive gothis cathedral in the middle of butt-f**** no-where----on the whim of an uncaring clergy--------small wonder the revolt.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:26 pm
 


sasquatch2 sasquatch2:
How did this clown ever get published?

What a crook......

I will address just a few of his revisionist lies.

Quebec (New France) was not defeated on the Plains of Abraham in 1759. That occurred a year later when General Amherst finally reduced Montreal.

It was not so much tactics or trickery that decided the result or Britains mastery of the seas (That came after 1815).

In 1759, New France and the french (about 80,000) were attempting to contain 1,000,000 english speakers in the 13 colonies with a series of forts on the St Lawrence, Ohio and Mississippi Rivers.
Doomed from the start they were simply outnumbered from the start------a minority statis in North America which have never really changed.

The French also were trying to farm land which was and still is sub-marginal due to soil type, drainage and short frost free season. In short they settled in the wrong place.


This is the best you can muster? Typical. I guess we can't expect much more from a mushed intellect coupled with a traschan education.

Firstly (it's "crock" not "crook") the Plains of Abraham was the beginning of the end of New France and the symbolic victory.
While the Marquis de Levis did manage an offensive campaign in 1760, they were forced by Murray at Sainte-Foy back to Quebec and then by the Royal Navy to Montreal. The Plains of Abraham was the symbolic turning point and its cultural significance outweighs anything the Marquis de Levis or Vaudreuil did (other than the eventual surrender) afterwards. Any competent student of history knows that.

Secondly, how did you arrive at 80,000 for New France's population in 1759? Most population figures list it at below 60,000, so this looks like another mistake for you.

Lastly, I hope you've got more "evidence" than that as, so far, i'm waiting on these "revisionist lies" not your piss poor understanding of Canadian history


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 6:52 pm
 


Mustang1
$1:
Secondly, how did you arrive at 80,000 for New France's population in 1759? Most population figures list it at below 60,000, so this looks like another mistake for you.


In the absense of definitive stats I chose the highest estimate. This does not alter in any material way my take and that of reputable historians that a minority was attempting to bottle up 1,000,000 english in the 13 colonies with a continent spaning line of forts. They were a minority then as now.

Your arrogant, ignorant remarks only clarify your uneducated ignorance and generally rudeness.

HOCKEY PUCK

It just occurred to me that you are possibly the ill-informed twit who authored this BS article in the first instance. It has your unenlightened mark on it. Stick to teaching kintergartern.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 7:12 pm
 


sasquatch2 sasquatch2:

In the absense of definitive stats I chose the highest estimate. This does not alter in any material way my take and that of reputable historians that a minority was attempting to bottle up 1,000,000 english in the 13 colonies with a continent spaning line of forts. They were a minority then as now.


So, you were wrong, peon. Instead of rationalizing your ignorance, just admit yet another mistake and go back to your corner. Dumbass.

$1:
Your arrogant, ignorant remarks only clarify your uneducated ignorance and generally rudeness.


Projection, moron. Your countless mistakes, trucker logic and infantile analysis illustrate your utter lack of education and piss poor genes. Want proof? “Uneducated ignorance” is redundant, you dumb ape.

$1:
HOCKEY PUCK


Asshat

$1:
It just occurred to me that you are possibly the ill-informed twit who authored this BS article in the first instance


That’s because your stupidity knows no bounds. The author’s name is Nick Vandergragt and that’s not me. Damn, you’re thick.

$1:
Stick to teaching kintergartern.


Sorry, that’s not my job, but you’re certainly on par with a 5 year old’s intellect. Oh…and it’s “Kindergarten”, you illiterate monkey, not “kintergartern”. The irony isn’t lost on many here.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 8:53 pm
 


I think Canada should abandon the concept of bilingual patronage.

If we were to consider ourselves multilingual, then we would realize how assinine it is to force all languages onto labels and government services.

Furthermore, most provinces are only pretending to be bilingual, meanwhile one of the few provinces(quebec) that is capable of being bilingual doesn't want to be.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 21, 2007 10:43 pm
 


$1:
Sorry, that’s not my job, but you’re certainly on par with a 5 year old’s intellect. Oh…and it’s “Kindergarten”, you illiterate monkey, not “kintergartern”. The irony isn’t lost on many here.


Yeah no doubt your restraining order prevents you getting within 100 meters of schools, playgrounds etc.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 1:06 am
 


isn't it Kindergar<b>d</b>en ?


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 4:42 am
 


sasquatch2 sasquatch2:
$1:
Sorry, that’s not my job, but you’re certainly on par with a 5 year old’s intellect. Oh…and it’s “Kindergarten”, you illiterate monkey, not “kintergartern”. The irony isn’t lost on many here.


Yeah no doubt your restraining order prevents you getting within 100 meters of schools, playgrounds etc.


Ewww....dummy resorts to the pedophile joke. You're projecting or a self-loather - either way, keep me out of your problems, loser.

Back to your corner, window-licker.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 4:43 am
 


Aging_Redneck Aging_Redneck:
isn't it Kindergar<b>d</b>en ?


No. It's German in origin and it's Kindergarten.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 11:22 am
 


Aging_Redneck

$1:
isn't it Kindergarden ?


Much as it distresses me, the wanna-be intellectual is correct.

It is a German word adopted directly.

What is amazing is that this twit has nothing more to contribute than personal attacks and meaningless obstreperousness about minor spelling errors. I specualte that he always uses spell check and without that asset would be irretrevably lost.

He seems to have a lot of issues (but don't we all). I recall he claimed law-enforcement experience, and then fell back on claims of being a "bouncer". That is not really an occupation requiring a great deal of formal education and that is clearly obvious.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 2:55 pm
 


sasquatch2 sasquatch2:
Aging_Redneck

$1:
isn't it Kindergarden ?


Much as it distresses me, the wanna-be intellectual is correct.


So you jumped on the bandwagon to cheerlead my intellectual superiority? Damn.

$1:
It is a German word adopted directly.


Wasn't that already addressed? All you've got now is rephrasing my posts? Back to the corner, Trucker Brains


$1:
What is amazing is that this twit has nothing more to contribute than personal attacks and meaningless obstreperousness about minor spelling errors.


Actually, it was only last night that I corrected your piss poor history, liar. So, to sum stuff up - you're a liar, bigot, intellectual coward and uneducated slug. Sorry, I've wasted your ass here on far more than your bastardization of the English language.

$1:
I specualte that he always uses spell check and without that asset would be irretrevably lost.


Sorry, i'm well versed in the English language and its composition and, besides, even without a spellcheck anyone with a Grade 9 education should know how to spell "speculate" and "irretrievably".

$1:
He seems to have a lot of issues (but don't we all).


Actually, my biggest hang up is with petulant, ignorant little bigots that run like little wusses the minute they're confronted intellectually. Hey, that's you!



$1:
I recall he claimed law-enforcement experience, and then fell back on claims of being a "bouncer". That is not really an occupation requiring a great deal of formal education and that is clearly obvious.


You "recall"?!?!? We're to take that giant empty maw that you ostensibly call a head and believe anything that comes rolling out? You're so fucktastically stupid that you've mixed me up with someone else! I've never claimed (go ahead, dipwad, find the post to prove me wrong) to have law-enforcement experience or a job as a bouncer. You poor stupid creature, your mashed intellect is so shitastically defective that you can't even differentiate posters.

We'll be waiting to see how you fumble that last one, window-licker.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 4:22 pm
 


As for the initial post I'd say it's better than what I had, but then I didn't study much in the way of Arts. I'd say that we should try being at least bilingual, and maybe trilingual. The rather shamefull realization that most Canucks speak 1 language was driven home when I started travelling and most people spoke my language and I didn't speak theirs. Really, the addition of French to mainstream culture won't hurt us and probably open a couple of doors for trade and tourism. At least our future generations will have more than one language to swear in;). As for it's utility - being able to deal with a community in both Europe and the developing nations in a language other than English could potentially be benefical and french is a language that will do that.

The better educated we are the better chances we have of staying in a first world position globally. If forced to formulate a political standpoint as a westerner, I look at it as a way of placing the old anti francophone facade where it belongs - in the past. I don't care what Trudeau or any other idiotic federal politician said or where or when they said it, I'd rather pick up some Canadian french than some American english (or any other language - not trying to bash the neigbors). Call me a patriot if you must.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 4:31 pm
 


Mustang1
$1:
You "recall"?!?!? We're to take that giant empty maw that you ostensibly call a head and believe anything that comes rolling out? You're so fucktastically stupid that you've mixed me up with someone else! I've never claimed (go ahead, dipwad, find the post to prove me wrong) to have law-enforcement experience or a job as a bouncer. You poor stupid creature, your mashed intellect is so shitastically defective that you can't even differentiate posters.


Okay I was wrong! You exhibit absolutely no evidence of anything beyond a grade 9 dropout.

IMHO.....I leave the definitive judgement to others.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2007 4:49 pm
 


$1:
check and without that asset would be irretrevably lost.


way to spell "irretrievably"... ROTFL


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