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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 4:46 pm
 


OPP wrote:
Prestwick wrote:
The western nations I mention are those like the UK, Canada, Holland and France who when asked to, step up and help out.

When I say help out abroad, I point to Kosovo, East Timor, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan. Even Germany has surprised me by sending a serious contingent to the Congo to help disarm militia and keep the peace.

Not everything revolves around US foreign policy OPP.


Your acting like Sweden does not help out in troubled regions!?


Yawn......go back to wussy neutered-ness ...neutrality etc. Sell a few of you’re raw materials to the local Fascists of the day and pat the odd starving third world type on the head.

Leave the real defence of our civilisation to the men who built it, the Anglo-Saxons.

Go Sweden go…..! Hide? It's what you are good at.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 4:52 pm
 


EyeBrock wrote:
OPP wrote:
Prestwick wrote:
The western nations I mention are those like the UK, Canada, Holland and France who when asked to, step up and help out.

When I say help out abroad, I point to Kosovo, East Timor, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan. Even Germany has surprised me by sending a serious contingent to the Congo to help disarm militia and keep the peace.

Not everything revolves around US foreign policy OPP.


Your acting like Sweden does not help out in troubled regions!?


Yawn......go back to wussy neutered-ness ...neutrality etc. Sell a few of you’re raw materials to the local Fascists of the day and pat the odd starving third world type on the head.

Leave the real defence of our civilisation to the men who built it, the Anglo-Saxons.

Go Sweden go…..! Hide? It's what you are good at.


Come agian??? You built our civilization?
Stop making an ass of yourselfe EyeBrock... it's just so pathetic.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2006 5:14 pm
 


OPP wrote:
EyeBrock wrote:
OPP wrote:
Prestwick wrote:
The western nations I mention are those like the UK, Canada, Holland and France who when asked to, step up and help out.

When I say help out abroad, I point to Kosovo, East Timor, Sierra Leone and Afghanistan. Even Germany has surprised me by sending a serious contingent to the Congo to help disarm militia and keep the peace.

Not everything revolves around US foreign policy OPP.


Your acting like Sweden does not help out in troubled regions!?


Yawn......go back to wussy neutered-ness ...neutrality etc. Sell a few of you’re raw materials to the local Fascists of the day and pat the odd starving third world type on the head.

Leave the real defence of our civilisation to the men who built it, the Anglo-Saxons.

Go Sweden go…..! Hide? It's what you are good at.


Come agian??? You built our civilization?
Stop making an ass of yourselfe EyeBrock... it's just so pathetic.


Yawn, you are now becoming very boring. Move on to another subject you know nothing about.


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PostPosted: Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:25 am
 


GORDON BROWN PRAISES SCOTTISH FOOTBALL HOOLIGANS


In 1967, after Scotland beat World Champions England 3-2 at Wembley, Scottish football hooligans invaded the pitch and ripped up parts of the pitch and pulled down the goalposts.

The Scottish fans also did the same in 1977 when Scotland beat England 2-1 at Wembley - this time they caused £15,000 worth of damage.

However, Chancellor of the Exchequer (and soon-to-be British Prime Minister) Gordon Brown - a Scotsman - has PRAISED those Scottish football hooligans.
-------------------------------------------------

My sheer joy at humiliating the English... by Gordon Brown
By SIMON WALTERS

Image
Hooligans: Scottish football fans invade the Wembley pitch in 1977 after they beat England 2-1 They pulled down the goalposts and ripped up the pitch causing £15,000 worth of damage to England's national stadium




Gordon Brown's claim that he would love to see England win the soccer World Cup has come under fresh scrutiny after it was revealed how he boasted of Scotland's 'humbling' of the England team that won the 1966 tournament.

He claimed Scotland were the real world champions because they beat Bobby Moore's heroes soon afterwards. And he revelled in the 'sheer joy of defeating the English at their own game'.

The Chancellor also saluted Scottish hooligans who tore up the Wembley turf and broke the crossbar after another victory over the English.

In an article entitled Why Scotland Means The World To Me, self-proclaimed "Tartan Army" member Mr Brown invokes ancient battlefield defeats by the English at Flodden and Culloden to explain why he enjoyed beating the Auld Enemy at football so much.

The remarks are in stark contrast to his comments two weeks ago about England's bid to host the competition in 2018, when he said twice that he hoped England would win.

Asked if he meant winning the right to host the tournament or 'win the whole thing', he replied: "Both."

When a row ensued in Scotland, Mr Brown said his first choice would be for Scotland to win the World Cup, but if they were knocked out he would back England.

But he did not cheer for England in his article for the book Football And The Commons People about MP soccer fans, published in 1994, the year Tony Blair become Labour leader and when Mr Brown was Shadow Chancellor.

It was before Labour set up the Scottish Parliament and before the English questioned the right of a Scot to be the Prime Minister of Britain.

The book was edited by Mr Brown's fellow Scots football fan, ex-Downing Street spin doctor Alastair Campbell. At the time the pair were friends, but they have been enemies since Mr Campbell said the Chancellor had 'psychological flaws'.

Mr Brown writes that as a 15-year-old schoolboy he played truant to watch Scotland play Italy in a failed attempt to reach the 1966 finals in England.

And he swears his undying loyalty. "You start young and you can't give up supporting Scotland. You can't walk out simply because they are playing badly. You'll be there irrespective of standards and bad luck. Once disappointed before, twice we turn up, and as optimists."

Pouring scorn on 'envious England', he praises 'the fanaticism of Scotland's following -of which I have been a part for many years' and proudly recounts appalling hooliganism after two of Scotland's most famous Wembley victories, the first in 1967 when they beat England's World Cup winners 3-2.

"You need only to recollect the scenes of delirium among Scots fans,' regales Brown, 'when they tore up bits of turf to take home - to realise there was more at stake than the result of 22 men kicking a ball around."

He shows no concern about even worse violence in 1977 when Scots fans ripped up more turf and broke the crossbar after Scotland won 2-1.

"There's a pub in central Scotland that displays a lump of Wembley turf to commemorate the victory,' says Brown.

"I wouldn't be surprised if some of the hundreds that took a lump had eaten a bit. Some, I know, jumped on to the crossbar and broke that up too." He says one of the rioters was an MP colleague, though he does not name him.

The book even includes a picture of a turf-wielding mob with Brown's caption: "Among my souvenirs: the Tartan Army comes out with the pitch."


The Chancellor's campaign to woo English voters by playing down his Scots roots and promoting "Britishness' is at odds with his scorn for English nationalism in the book.

"If English nationalism flowered on the playing fields of Eton, Scottish nationalism's one recurrent expression is on the pitch at Hampden Park [Scotland's national soccer stadium],' he proclaims.

"Which explains why many Scots' pride has been enhanced by the sheer joy of defeating the English at the game they regard as their own."

He keeps returning to the 1967 victory. "It was one of the greatest hours of the boys in blue. I was 16 but still remember watching the humbling of England on the very pitch they had been crowned only a year previously as the champions of the world - by the skills and audacity of "Slim Jim" Baxter, one of my heroes.

"In Scotland, that day is thought of as the real World Cup decider. I feel similarly about the 2-1 win at Hampden in 1976 when Kenny Dalglish slid the ball through the legs of a disbelieving Ray Clemence." Clemence is now England's goalkeeping coach.

Brown berates another former England international, ex-BBC commentator Jimmy Hill, for deriding Scotland's short-lived lead over Brazil in a match in 1982 before going on to lose 4-1.

"It was joy, pure joy for the Scottish team and for us on the terraces. I still remember my anger about Jimmy Hill's comment that our brush with greatness was merely a "toepoke"."

Brown says he was 'one of the Tartan Army that went to Italy' for a World Cup game in 1990 and makes a jokey reference to humiliation on the battlefield at "Flodden and Culloden'.

"Such rare soccer triumphs must be judged in an historical context in which disappointments and defeats at the hands of the English are legion."

In 1513, English longbow men slaughtered 10,000 Scots at Flodden in Northumberland. In 1745, Bonnie Prince Charlie's attempt to restore the Stuarts to the English throne ended in crushing defeat at Culloden in Scotland.

Brown rues Scotland's poor form in the Eighties and Nineties, but concludes with an anti-English rally cry: "Who knows? Some day... And if the worst comes to the worst, we still beat England sometimes."

dailymail.co.uk


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 03, 2007 4:14 am
 


Policeman is killed and many injured as Italian football hooligans riot......



Italian football suspended after policeman dies in riot

3rd February 2007


Image
Fans clash with police outside Catania's Angelo Massimino stadium after the Italian first division soccer league match between Palermo and Catania, in Sicily
------------------------

Image
Italy's bid to host Euro 2012 has been dealt a severe blow. This comes just months after several Italian clubs were punished for match-fixing




Italian football is facing up to a new crisis after all football was suspended indefinitely after a police officer was killed during serious trouble at last night's Sicilian derby between Catania and Palermo.

According to reports, 38-year-old Filippo Raciti was struck in the face by a small explosive while attempting to deal with fighting outside the stadium. He was taken to hospital but died from his injuries.

After an emergency meeting last night and Italian football federation (FIGC) commissioner Luca Pancalli announced an immediate suspension of football.

Coming less than a year after the match-fixing scandal which saw Juventus demoted to Serie B and Fiorentina, Lazio and AC Milan also punished, the FIGC once again has some tough decisions to make.

"I have demanded a stop to all activity of football in Italy," Pancalli said in a statement. "Enough is enough.

"It's a situation that I cannot speak of. To lose your life at 38 is incredible. This is not a sport.

"The football tournaments will remain suspended until we solve the violence in our football. It's unacceptable that such incidents happen in a country like Italy."

Those thoughts were echoed by Palermo president Maurizio Zamparini, who has called for stricter laws regarding violence at football matches.

"These people are not fans, but are delinquents that in other countries like England would have been arrested and seriously punished," he said.

"Unfortunately in Italy these things are still allowed to happen. We need more severe laws." Italy were hoping to host the European Championships in 2012.

"At this moment I'm not thinking about (the bid) but should we lose our Euro 2012 bid because of this situation, we would deserve to lose it," Pancalli added.

Italy's national team was due to play Romania in Siena on Wednesday but that game - and the under-21 fixture against Belgium in Chieti on Tuesday - will not go ahead as things stand.

The president of the Italian Olympic Committee, Gianni Petrucci, has backed the FIGC's decision to suspend all football activity, and Italian Prime Minister Romano Prodi added his voice to those calling for action to be taken to stop the trouble.

"After the serious incidents that occurred in Catania, my first thought is for the people that have been affected and for their families," he said.

"I feel a duty to say that we need a strong and clear signal to avoid the degeneration of this sport which we are seeing more dramatically and more often."

Around 100 people were reported to be injured - some seriously - after fighting erupted in the build-up to the game at the Angelo Massimino Stadium.

Trouble continued throughout the evening, with the game suspended for around 30 minutes at one stage.

Palermo won the match 2-1 but players and staff were held in the stadium by police after the game while the area was secured.

Catania club executive Pietro Lo Monaco reacted to news of the officer's death by announcing he would leave football.

"To speak of football right now seems useless. For me this is the end. I will leave the football world," he said.

"I don't recognise myself in this world anymore. I have loved football intensely but after this right now it seems absurd."


dailymail.co.uk


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 3:03 am
 


Italy threatens spectator-free football unless clubs clean up


Tom Kington in Rome
Tuesday February 6, 2007
The Guardian

Image
The funeral of Italian policeman Filippo Raciti, who was killed during a football riot in Sicily. Photograph: Marcello Paternostro/AFP/Getty Images



The Italian government has announced a series of tough measures to tighten security at football matches following the death of a policeman during a riot in Sicily on Friday.

After meeting sports authorities, the interior minister, Giuliano Amato, said arrest powers would be beefed up, Italian stadiums not in line with security norms would be forced to play games behind closed doors, and clubs would be banned from selling blocks of tickets to visiting teams.

Only five top-flight Italian stadiums meet the regulations demanded by 2005 legislation, including the use of cameras and turnstiles. The sports minister, Giovanna Melandri, said clubs would be more closely involved in the running of stadiums, which are mostly owned by local councils.

Italian football clubs will also be forbidden from forming financial relationships with militant supporters' groups. An announcement on the restart of the Italian football season, which was suspended at the weekend, will probably follow a meeting of the Italian cabinet later this week, when the new measures are formalised.

"I know it is excessive to have football played without a public, but it is even more excessive that someone should die for football," said Mr Amato.

Mr Amato and Ms Melandri rushed back to the meeting in Rome from Catania on Monday after joining hundreds of mourners at the funeral of police inspector Filippo Raciti. Mr Raciti's widow Marisa Grasso, accompanied by her two children, told the congregation she hoped her husband's death might help ring the changes in violence-ridden Italian football.

The Pope sent a telegram, in which he condemned "any violent gesture which stains the game of football".

Police continued to make arrests in Catania, including two men suspected of participating in the riot, which saw Mr Raciti fatally struck by a flying object.

Police also located a stash of arms yesterday hidden inside Catania's Massimino football stadium, the scene of the rioting. Baseball bats and iron balls, described by police as offensive weapons, were found in a room used by the stadium's caretaker, who was arrested after he tried to stop the raid by setting dogs on police officers.

guardian.co.uk


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 5:07 am
 


While a tragedy, if the mafia had of taken him out, would this have made the headlines that it did?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 10:09 am
 


GreatBriton wrote:
Police also located a stash of arms yesterday hidden inside Catania's Massimino football stadium, the scene of the rioting. Baseball bats and iron balls, described by police as offensive weapons, were found in a room used by the stadium's caretaker, who was arrested after he tried to stop the raid by setting dogs on police officers.

guardian.co.uk


Sick bastards...


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 20, 2007 5:30 am
 


First off, i came across this board by 'accident' and i cant believe how behind the times you all are on football violence.........Yes the english were once the worst nation for it, but by the standards of other countries we are no way the worst now. The Italians, Dutch, Polish, Germans, just to name a few have in resent yrs gone way over the top with their violence. Most English football grounds are now some of the safest sporting venues in the world, they certainly are the most watched as every major ground has a high tech survalence system and the numbers of police at ground are almost reaching overkill. The majority of english football violence now is all pre arranged and take place welll away from the grounds. In my opinion they are stupid fucks for fighting over who supports a certain team.

As for when the national team play away, a lot of the trouble (not all of it and im not defending the idiots that do cause trouble) is caused by the police who are usually over the top heavy handed with the english fans including the women and children who go. I have seen incidents during the last world cup where german police have let german fans throw bottles etc at english fans and do nothing then when an english fan stands up against the abuse the police have set about him and others around him with batons, again women and children included. To finish, yes football violence was once 'The English Disease' but now other countries are far far worse. FACT





Oh yeah ...... nearly forgot................. GLORY GLORY MAN UNITED.

On course again for another Treble


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 09, 2007 3:11 am
 


http://images.thesun.co.uk/picture/0,,2007160390,00.jpg
Threat ... an 'Invasion' shirt on sale in Rome and, inset, injured Man U fan


Ultra yobs get shirty for clash


April 09, 2007


The Ultras - "fans" of Roma who are nothing but an organised gang of football hooligans - may be planning violence for Roma's game in Manchester against Manchester United in the Quarter Final, Second Leg of the European Cup Quarter Final.


ROMA’S Ultra football thugs are wearing “Invasion of Manchester” T-shirts and have bought 2,700 tickets for the match with United.

The shirts picture fierce Roman soldiers and officials fear more violence after Man U fans were attacked by Italian cops in last week’s Champions League first leg in Rome.

Ordinary Roma fans told how they could not get tickets.

One said: “The Ultras controlled ticket booths. Those that weren’t Ultras weren’t given any.”

thesun.co.uk


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 15, 2007 3:26 am
 


As Continental Europe's heavy-handed police attacked Tottenham fans at the Seville game and Manchester United fans at the Roma game - even though the opposition fans who were left untouched by the police were the ones to blame for the troubles, especially Roma's notorious Ultras (their hooligan followers) who were left alone by the Italian riot police despite instigating the violence - UEFA, European football's governing body, arrogantly blames it on the ENGLISH fans, telling their fans not to drink too much alcohol at games, rather than attacking the Italian and Spanish riot police who attack innocent fans - i.e the English.

Meanwhile, the boss of Italy's FA says he may adopt English football's more effective policy of controlling crowd trouble at games by using stewards to eject unruly football fans (whilst leaving innocent ones alone) rather than, as it is in the rest of Europe, trigger-happy riot police who attacks whole sections of a crowd including the innocent and defenceless, including children and people in wheelchairs.

The Continental Europeans need to sort out their football violence rather than blaming it on the "drunken English." Violence and racism against black players is virtually non-existant in English football grounds these days, unlike the rest of Europe.
*************************************

BOOZE? UEFA LACK BOTTLE TO FIND REAL CAUSE OF VIOLENCE
Brian Reade 14/04/2007

Daily Mail


WHAT a hoot, no make that a crate of Hooch, is UEFA's plea to Manchester United fans to cut back on their drinking when they visit Milan next month.


"United has to tell them what is appropriate. There has been a problem with drink and it would be nice if the supporters were told not to do it," said Salvation Army War Cry salesman, sorry UEFA spokesman, William Gaillard.


So by how much should they cut back? One Peroni? A vat of valpolicella?


And how would it have halted all that violence in Rome? By making them think quicker, so they could have leapt out of the way before an Ultra on a Vespa plunged a knife into their buttocks?


Would it have let them see more clearly the bottles flying at them as they sat in their seat? Would they have been less likely to fall into a coma when their skull was cracked by a police baton?


It's a novel idea that football fans visiting Milan should spend the day sipping coffee in cafes outside Il Duomo, debating whether da Vinci had finer strokes than Caravaggio. But it's slightly flawed.

If drinking by Englishmen automatically leads to ugly violence, how do UEFA explain away all the hundreds of trips by our club's supporters in recent years where no trouble has occurred?


How do they explain the riots, knifings, coin-hurling, bloody ambushes and cop killing that have led to the cancellation of entire fixture lists thanks to those peaceful, non-drinking Italian fans this season? How do they account for Italian police turning into power-drunk Nazi thugs?



Surely UEFA should be calling on the Italian government to force their people to cut back on espressos. Because too many of those caffeine-hits are clearly lethal.


While we're at it, maybe FIFA should order those crazy Central Americans who get games abandoned through riots and shoot their own players, to cut back on their taco intake. Of course many followers of English clubs consume more ale than they should on foreign awaydays. So do most English holidaymakers. And maybe their GPs should advise them to take it easy.


But when UEFA dish out the advice you know you're staring at a huge smokescreen. Without hitting the Italians hard for what happened in Rome, they cynically point the finger of blame at a universally accepted myth. All Englishmen turn up to football matches drunk.


The bottle gives them a ready-made scapegoat, and stops them examining the real concerns over spectator safety. And there is a huge one on the horizon that's being ignored. If Liverpool and Manchester United make it to the final in Athens there will be trouble. These are two sets of fans whose mutual loathing knows no bounds. They are also two of the best-supported clubs in the world who will probably take 35,000 fans each to Greece for a couple of days.


And it won't need a drop of ouzo in a single vein for bad blood to be spilt. UEFA have already fanned the flames by allocating a mere 17,000 tickets to each finalist, in a 64,000-seater ground.


Which means tens of thousands of resentful Mancs and Scousers will be snarling at each other in the streets, pushed about by some of the most trigger-happy cops in Europe. While inside the stadium UEFA's delegates and sponsors carry on getting sozzled on the finest wines known to man. (There's less chance of THEM cutting back on the booze than Johnny Vegas).


Imagine the centre of Athens after the game, when one set of fans who've just lost the biggest grudge match in their clubs' history are being taunted by the others? If UEFA understood the reality of football - and did its job properly - there would be plans in place when such an explosive scenario presents itself, to move the game to a safer option. Wembley should be lined up with a compensation package in place to keep the Greeks happy. Because if Liverpool and United get to hold a three-day festival of loathing in sunny Athens, everyone over there and back home will suffer.


But UEFA are guaranteed to arrogantly ignore reality. Why? Because the five-star hotel suites and the corporate freebies are already booked. And if there is a bloodbath outside the ground while they're inside sipping their claret, well they've always got their fall-back.


They can blame it all on the drink.


mirror.co.uk


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