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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 5:58 pm
 


This is a topic that is being discussed in a number of places right now.

After Snowden revealed how deeply the US government has penetrated different firms (like Google) and how they're able to break many VPN protocols on the fly there has been a reaction in the global IT community.

New encryption protocols have started to surface that are so effective that not even the people who are providing them can break them.

Meaning that even if the government bothers to get a warrant from a real court there's still no guarantee that they can access the data they're after. And some in government are thinking that people should not be 'allowed' to have access to encryption so powerful that it can't be broken.

But we've had unbreakable one-time pads for generations and they're not illegal. So why ban or criminalize encryption protocols that government can't break? Hate to say, but if encryption is outlawed it won't stop encryption.

I suppose I'm of a mind that the government can obtain warrants for all sorts of things but that there's no reason for why their job has to be easy.

Thoughts?


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:43 pm
 


The only issue I have with this type of technology is that once it's out there it's accessible to everyone and once that happens you have to know that people unfriendly to the West will be acquiring the best and using it.

So, if you decide to allow something like this in the name of personal freedom you also have to accept the fact you'll be leaving yourselves unprotected from some potential terrorist and conventional attacks.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 09, 2015 9:03 pm
 


My mother has been afraid to talk on the phone about certain subjects. When I raised politics, issues in the news, she felt the government was listening. She's scared to use the phone. And we're in Canada. Do you really want that kind of thing?

The US already had an issue where the NSA collected phone data, call times and phone numbers. They used it to find members of the Tea Party and harass them. One item I remember from the news was unnecessary IRS investigations. I think there were others, but don't remember. Republicans made a stink about it, news claims members of the Tea Party aren't harassed any more, but the NSA still collects phone data. It appears to have stopped when the Republics won a majority in Congress, not before.

Blatant politics. That's why. Authority will be abused. Always has, always will. The RCMP are required to get a warrant signed by a judge before they can do anything. As long as some intelligence agency is blatantly watching everyone, that *WILL* be abused.

I could give more examples of abuse of authority. But instead quote Benjamin Franklin: "Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety." This has been paraphrased many times. Should I post one?


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 7:18 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
I suppose I'm of a mind that the government can obtain warrants for all sorts of things but that there's no reason for why their job has to be easy.

Thoughts?


With how hard the FBI is trolling the line 'but encryption prevents criminals from being caught', that's when I knew encryption has to become the norm. It's now legal in the UK to put 'backdoors' in programs so the government can snoop, and it's illegal to tell anyone that the backdoors exist.

I have a right to my privacy, therefore I have the right to protect my private things in any way I see fit. That included passwords on my phones, computers and full encryption on them too. Not puny SHA-1, but full RSA 4096 bit. :twisted:

I also have a right to not remember the passwords when asked. Go ahead, sieze my computers and NAS and backups and all my other stuff. They won't find anything but random noise. :)


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 9:09 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
I suppose I'm of a mind that the government can obtain warrants for all sorts of things but that there's no reason for why their job has to be easy.

Thoughts?


With how hard the FBI is trolling the line 'but encryption prevents criminals from being caught', that's when I knew encryption has to become the norm. It's now legal in the UK to put 'backdoors' in programs so the government can snoop, and it's illegal to tell anyone that the backdoors exist.

I have a right to my privacy, therefore I have the right to protect my private things in any way I see fit. That included passwords on my phones, computers and full encryption on them too. Not puny SHA-1, but full RSA 4096 bit. :twisted:

I also have a right to not remember the passwords when asked. Go ahead, sieze my computers and NAS and backups and all my other stuff. They won't find anything but random noise. :)



:|

Quote:
Researchers from Tel Aviv University and the Weizmann Institute of Science discovered that they could steal even the largest, most secure RSA 4,096-bit encryption keys simply by listening to a laptop as it decrypts data.

To accomplish the trick, the researchers used a microphone to record the noises made by the computer, then ran that audio through filters to isolate the vibrations made by the electronic internals during the decryption process. With that accomplished, some cryptanalysis revealed the encryption key in around an hour.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 9:28 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
I suppose I'm of a mind that the government can obtain warrants for all sorts of things but that there's no reason for why their job has to be easy.

Thoughts?


With how hard the FBI is trolling the line 'but encryption prevents criminals from being caught', that's when I knew encryption has to become the norm. It's now legal in the UK to put 'backdoors' in programs so the government can snoop, and it's illegal to tell anyone that the backdoors exist.

I have a right to my privacy, therefore I have the right to protect my private things in any way I see fit. That included passwords on my phones, computers and full encryption on them too. Not puny SHA-1, but full RSA 4096 bit. :twisted:

I also have a right to not remember the passwords when asked. Go ahead, sieze my computers and NAS and backups and all my other stuff. They won't find anything but random noise. :)



:|

Quote:
Researchers from Tel Aviv University and the Weizmann Institute of Science discovered that they could steal even the largest, most secure RSA 4,096-bit encryption keys simply by listening to a laptop as it decrypts data.

To accomplish the trick, the researchers used a microphone to record the noises made by the computer, then ran that audio through filters to isolate the vibrations made by the electronic internals during the decryption process. With that accomplished, some cryptanalysis revealed the encryption key in around an hour.


But, they still need the password to decrypt it, and physical access to derive the key. They couldn't do it remotely, and without the password.

Even easier if government backdoors are in place though. All that will mean is no one used government approved software. :)

Or:

Image


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 11:53 am
 


If it's that bad then it's time for a revolution. A bloody one, too.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2015 12:08 pm
 


BartSimpson wrote:
If it's that bad then it's time for a revolution. A bloody one, too.


Preaching to the choir here. I even thought I was a bit paranoid back in '98 when I heard the US government was taking all the overseas fiber cables and routing them through a single room on land so they could listen in on everything. Seems I wasn't paranoid enough, given the reality.

Now we have: http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfre ... rge-orwell


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