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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:19 am
 


ziggy wrote:
Were not responsible for global climate change,its a natural cycle.

I disagree. We're contributing to it.





PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:22 am
 


JetBoy wrote:
ziggy wrote:
Were not responsible for global climate change,its a natural cycle.

I disagree. We're contributing to it.
Drop in the bucket. I spent all of wensday with the vice president of environment for a big company,I consider her well qualified
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Ms. ******* holds a B.Sc. in Physics from the University of Ottawa (1978) and an M.Sc. in Meteorology from Mc Gill University (1980). She completed the mechanical engineering curriculum at the University of Toronto in 1984 and is a member of OIQ in Québec and PEO in Ontario.
Her and her colleagues say its natural. 8)


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:28 am
 


Most experts think we're contributing to it. Some don't. Considering how much CO2 we've pumped into the atmosphere, I'm going with the majority. How much we're contributing to it, however, I admit I'm not sure, but it's not just a drop in the bucket.

Just look how fast the climate is currently changing in many parts of the world. It's happening in our lifetimes before our eyes. If you were to go back in time you would see climate naturally changing much slower (unless there was a catastrophic event like an asteroid, unusual sun activity, or super volcano.)





PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:32 am
 


JetBoy wrote:
Most experts think we're contributing to it. Some don't. Considering how much CO2 we've pumped into the atmosphere, I'm going with the majority. How much we're contributing to it, however, I admit I'm not sure, but it's not just a drop in the bucket.

Just look how fast the climate is currently changing in many parts of the world. It's happening in our lifetimes before our eyes. If you were to go back in time you would see climate naturally changing much slower (unless there was a catastrophic event like an asteroid, unusual sun activity, or super volcano.)
Well I havent noticed any change in my 40 plus years in Alberta or any other province or territory I have worked in. it still snows,blows and rains like it has been for millions of years.Theres allways someone though who will equate any meterological event with global warming.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:33 am
 


JetBoy wrote:
Just look how fast the climate is currently changing in many parts of the world. It's happening in our lifetimes before our eyes.
What do you mean?





PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:35 am
 


JetBoy wrote:
Most experts think we're contributing to it. Some don't. Considering how much CO2 we've pumped into the atmosphere, I'm going with the majority. How much we're contributing to it, however, I admit I'm not sure, but it's not just a drop in the bucket.

Just look how fast the climate is currently changing in many parts of the world. It's happening in our lifetimes before our eyes. If you were to go back in time you would see climate naturally changing much slower (unless there was a catastrophic event like an asteroid, unusual sun activity, or super volcano.)

Sedimentary layers in the rockies show nothing unusuall in millions of years,if the rock is coal bearing then you can also see when the ice ages happened and every single volcanic eruption that has happened since the sediments were laid down.

EDIT-lets not forget meteor impacts,this can also be seen in sedimentary rock.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:39 am
 


RUEZ wrote:
What do you mean?

There's plenty of examples. I don't really feel like looking them all up but obviously one such example is our Arctic.





PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:41 am
 


JetBoy wrote:
RUEZ wrote:
What do you mean?

There's plenty of examples. I don't really feel like looking them all up but obviously one such example is our Arctic.
What about our arctic? 8)


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:42 am
 


ziggy wrote:
Sedimentary layers in the rockies show nothing unusuall in millions of years,if the rock is coal bearing then you can also see when the ice ages happened and every single volcanic eruption that has happened since the sediments were laid down.


Think of how relatively slowly the ice ages have come and gone. We live in but just a little blip in time. For there to be any noticable change in our lifetime should be considered unusually fast.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:45 am
 


ziggy wrote:
What about our arctic? 8)


Ice has melted quite noticably, hence all the current squabbling between the US, Canada, Russia, and Denmark over mineral and passage rights.





PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:50 am
 


JetBoy wrote:
ziggy wrote:
What about our arctic? 8)


Ice has melted quite noticably, hence all the current squabbling between the US, Canada, Russia, and Denmark over mineral and passage rights.
Thats natural and not that big a deal.Thats what ice does in summer months....it melts.Funny how that one peice that broke away got entangled in the Global warming debate,it and other ice shelves have been tracked for years melting and breaking off,i have the link on my other pc and will post it later.I think it may have been environment Canadas arctic site.

I thought you were going to tell me the permafrost is melting. :roll:


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 4:56 am
 


ziggy wrote:
Thats natural and not that big a deal.Thats what ice does in summer months....it melts.Funny how that one peice that broke away got entangled in the Global warming debate,it and other ice shelves have been tracked for years melting and breaking off,i have the link on my other pc and will post it later.I think it may have been environment Canadas arctic site.

I know ice melts during the summer, but you would think it would all come back again in the winter. Some of it does but not as much as it used to. Year after year there's less ice. This isn't theory. This is something tangible they can physically monitor.





PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 5:06 am
 


JetBoy wrote:
ziggy wrote:
Thats natural and not that big a deal.Thats what ice does in summer months....it melts.Funny how that one peice that broke away got entangled in the Global warming debate,it and other ice shelves have been tracked for years melting and breaking off,i have the link on my other pc and will post it later.I think it may have been environment Canadas arctic site.

I know ice melts during the summer, but you would think it would all come back again in the winter. Some of it does but not as much as it used to. Year after year there's less ice. This isn't theory. This is something tangible they can physically monitor.
We had 9 feet of ice on lake Tehake this spring,same amount as the last 12 years when they started monitoring it.Trust me....it comes back end of September.The only ice melting up there this winter was in my glass of Crown Royal,nothing like huge chunks of blue arctic ice to compliment a good whisky. :wink:





PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 5:40 am
 


Bring on global warming!!!!!!


Please!


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 10:33 am
 


Jetboy
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Most experts think we're contributing to it. Some don't.


The much publicized "CONSENSUS" is another fabrication which never existed. The only consensus was within the IPCC and the MSM. The concesus, like the "hockey stick", NASA's claim for "1998 being the warmest since 1880" are now all thoroughly discredited.

Jetboy should do some reading and not just quoting the Gorical and Suzuki.

Suzuki is as qualified on the environment as Mr. Dressup.

He should read the recent spat of peer-review material that thoroughly debunks CO2's role in a largely non-event.

The CO2 AGW, science was not strong, was contrived and now proven so.

Science, the real stuff, shows the early Holocene (end of the last ICE AGE) was extremely warm sufficient to largely remove 1 mile thick ICE SHEETS from most of North America and Eurasia, in about a 10 year time span. That's bloody warm.


Last edited by sasquatch2 on Fri Aug 24, 2007 10:40 am, edited 1 time in total.

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