CKA Forums
Login 
canadian forums
bottom
 
 
Canadian Forums

Author Topic Options
Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 29481
PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2020 12:38 pm
 


Title: Canada's Trudeau plans sweeping social welfare reform, sources say
Category: Political
Posted By: Robair
Date: 2020-08-19 12:37:07
Canadian


Offline
CKA Super Elite
CKA Super Elite
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 8157
PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2020 12:38 pm
 


This will not end well.

Wexit will be his legacy.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 15236
PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2020 12:58 pm
 


Dang does this mean no more suffocating austerity or government policymaking outsourced to corporate boardrooms?


Offline
CKA Super Elite
CKA Super Elite
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 8157
PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2020 1:03 pm
 


It means a bunch of taxpayer funded green new deal subsidies that won't supply tax revenue to generate taxes for the green new deal while choking off Canadian oil that used to supply tax revenue while importing saudi crude.

No time for punctuation!!!


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 15236
PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2020 3:13 pm
 


Robair wrote:
It means a bunch of taxpayer funded green new deal subsidies that won't supply tax revenue to generate taxes for the green new deal while choking off Canadian oil that used to supply tax revenue while importing saudi crude.

No time for punctuation!!!


So then....your answer to my question is yes.


Offline
CKA Super Elite
CKA Super Elite


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 9942
PostPosted: Wed Aug 19, 2020 6:22 pm
 


They must be horrible, even though you haven't the slightest idea what they are just like the rest of us. But Trudeau said it so it must be bad.


Offline
Forum Super Elite
Forum Super Elite
 Pittsburgh Penguins
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 2145
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 11:34 am
 


herbie wrote:
They must be horrible, even though you haven't the slightest idea what they are just like the rest of us. But Trudeau said it so it must be bad.


The taps are really going to be turned on,” said a fiscally conservative Liberal who is concerned that spending could get out of hand. “That’s the biggest risk….”

Freeland, a former journalist who as foreign minister was Canada’s lead negotiator for a new North American trade deal, on Tuesday said she wanted a restart plan that was green, fair and inclusive.

She is a social interventionist activist, so she believes in the power of government and also believes in the redirection of funds to those who need it most,” said one Liberal who has worked closely with Freeland. Canada’s budget deficit this fiscal year is forecast to hit C$343.2 billion, the largest since World War Two."



https://globalnews.ca/news/7285577/t...l-sources/amp/

Nothing to see her, herbie.......move along./s


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 15236
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 11:59 am
 


And the period after world war two saw the greatest economic expansion, increase in standard of living and growth of the middle class in all of human history. Not a Coincidence.


Offline
Forum Super Elite
Forum Super Elite
Profile
Posts: 2345
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 12:37 pm
 


BeaverFever wrote:
And the period after world war two saw the greatest economic expansion, increase in standard of living and growth of the middle class in all of human history. Not a Coincidence.

That was kind of a unique situation. The factories of Europe and Japan were laying in rubble after the war. The untouched factories of North America were ready to step up and produce the goods that the world needed. Nowadays the factories of the third world are all up and running, and willing to produce the goods at a fraction of a cost of the factories of North America. Back then the taxpayers of the U.S. were willing to shell out money to prop up countries (including former adversaries) to help fight communism. No more! Now its dog eat dog. Americans are tired of American companies creating jobs in foreign countries, that includes Canada. If American tax dollars are bailing out American companies, than its only fair that they put AMERICANS to work.

So with reduced worldwide demand for Canadian goods as third world factories take over, and an increased demand that American factories return to the U.S., exactly how do you propose that Canada pull itself out of this proposed drunken sailor spending spree? I see NO similarities to 2020 and 1945, and that includes the U.S.

People in North America are not willing to live like people in the third world. We cannot produce goods at competitive rates with the third world. Our manufacturing base will continue to shrink. Automation is shrinking the service sector as well. Where do you propose that the tax base to pay for all this spending is going to come from?


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Montreal Canadiens
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 31080
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 12:39 pm
 


So what we need is another war... I'm in. [B-o]


Offline
CKA Super Elite
CKA Super Elite


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 9942
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 12:47 pm
 


Lots to see, little to bitch about. Unless you want to count the entire deficit as social welfare spending.
Think of all the arguments against a Guaranteed Annual Income, none estimated a cost anywhere near that. And wouldn't require a stadium full of agencies and bureaucrats like we have now. And most work like the Mega-charities, for every dollar in, a nickel reaches the people who need it.
Not saying that's what they plan. Too simple and drastic for either of our right wing parties.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 21510
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 2:48 pm
 


rickc wrote:
BeaverFever wrote:
And the period after world war two saw the greatest economic expansion, increase in standard of living and growth of the middle class in all of human history. Not a Coincidence.


That was kind of a unique situation. The factories of Europe and Japan were laying in rubble after the war. The untouched factories of North America were ready to step up and produce the goods that the world needed. Nowadays the factories of the third world are all up and running, and willing to produce the goods at a fraction of a cost of the factories of North America. Back then the taxpayers of the U.S. were willing to shell out money to prop up countries (including former adversaries) to help fight communism. No more! Now its dog eat dog. Americans are tired of American companies creating jobs in foreign countries, that includes Canada. If American tax dollars are bailing out American companies, than its only fair that they put AMERICANS to work.

So with reduced worldwide demand for Canadian goods as third world factories take over, and an increased demand that American factories return to the U.S., exactly how do you propose that Canada pull itself out of this proposed drunken sailor spending spree? I see NO similarities to 2020 and 1945, and that includes the U.S.

People in North America are not willing to live like people in the third world. We cannot produce goods at competitive rates with the third world. Our manufacturing base will continue to shrink. Automation is shrinking the service sector as well. Where do you propose that the tax base to pay for all this spending is going to come from?


American companies operate in other countries to get around tariffs, import quotas and so on, not because they want to create jobs in other countries. The US is free to engage in whatever protectionist policies they want, but what happens is that the targets of those tariffs/quotas are allowed to respond in kind with tariffs/quotas of their own. That's what happened in 2018 and again this month.

It is also exactly what happened in the Great Depression, as round after round of protectionist policies severely damaged global trade and caused massive economic losses.

I agree that the situation is not the same as after World War 2, but there will is lots of pent up consumer demand. Very few people are buying homes, cars, or making other major purchases, nevermind all the huge drops in international travel, because of the pandemic and fears of further job losses.

So when COVID-19 goes away (or the threat reduced due to vaccines/herd immunity), I believe there will be significant demand for large purchases and travel, which will cause a mini-boom. It won't last as long as the post-war boom did, but it will probably last a year or two and provide strong economic growth.

And that growth will provide large sums of sales taxes, while also removing the need for huge social spending (CERB et al), which should reduce the deficit quite a bit, although I wouldn't be surprised to see GST go up a percent or two to help get rid of it. You are correct that automation will reduce taxes from manufacturers, and I'd guess the rest of the tax base will come from technology and other service companies.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 15236
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 4:24 pm
 


rickc wrote:
BeaverFever wrote:
And the period after world war two saw the greatest economic expansion, increase in standard of living and growth of the middle class in all of human history. Not a Coincidence.

That was kind of a unique situation. The factories of Europe and Japan were laying in rubble after the war. The untouched factories of North America were ready to step up and produce the goods that the world needed.


don’t think that’s quite accurate. Post war most Americans were not employed producing export goods. It’s true North American industry had the advantage of not being bombed but that advantage took the form of technological advancement and North American companies growing large enough to open branch plants in foreign countries. One of the reasons Germany and Japan became major economies in the post- war decades is because they got shiny new factories paid for with government money, including aid from the US and allies. Many of those new factories were owned by American parent companies. Remember there was no free trade back then and fairly limited trade outside of commodities like oil and agricultural products. Goods moved almost entirely by ship as commercial air transport wasn’t advanced enough and even the ships of the time were too small and alow to supply the world. Most Americans bought us-made consumer goods and most Europeans bought European made consumer goods. even if some of those “European” factories were subsidiaries of US companies.


Quote:
Nowadays the factories of the third world are all up and running, and willing to produce the goods at a fraction of a cost of the factories of North America. Back then the taxpayers of the U.S. were willing to shell out money to prop up countries (including former adversaries) to help fight communism. No more! Now its dog eat dog. Americans are tired of American companies creating jobs in foreign countries, that includes Canada. If American tax dollars are bailing out American companies, than its only fair that they put AMERICANS to work.

So with reduced worldwide demand for Canadian goods as third world factories take over, and an increased demand that American factories return to the U.S., exactly how do you propose that Canada pull itself out of this proposed drunken sailor spending spree? I see NO similarities to 2020 and 1945, and that includes the U.S.

People in North America are not willing to live like people in the third world. We cannot produce goods at competitive rates with the third world. Our manufacturing base will continue to shrink. Automation is shrinking the service sector as well. Where do you propose that the tax base to pay for all this spending is going to come from?


Third world countries are decades behind technologically. That’s why this about funding new green technologies and new industries not old industries.

But more importantly what you’re missing is that you’re fixated on subsidies for manufacturing. Nobody said this was just about manufacturing or subsidies. When governments inject money to the economy, people start spending in every sector. They open stores, consulting firms, people get their driveways resurfaced, windows replaced they take more weekend road trips. People who can newly afford daycare go back to work full-time. Building and repairing long-neglected vital infrastructure: highways, sewers, schools, etc cant be outsourced overseas. All that spending grows the economy and creates more jobs. Manufacturing isn’t the entire economy


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 14680
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2020 5:18 pm
 


Robair wrote:
It means a bunch of taxpayer funded green new deal subsidies that won't supply tax revenue to generate taxes for the green new deal while choking off Canadian oil that used to supply tax revenue while importing saudi crude.

No time for punctuation!!!



Given Trudeau's penchant for picking Chinese companies over Canadian ones. Any green subsidies will no longer go to those evil oil corporate boardrooms with North American executives and will now be redirected to these nice gentlemen who only have the health of the planet as their motives. ROTFL

Quote:
Li Hejun, Chairman, Hanenergy Holdings. $31.5 billion. After graduating as a mechanical engineer in 1988, Li Hejun borrowed RMB50,000 ($8,264) from a professor to start his own business. After several attempts at new ventures, including bottled water, electronic parts, mining and real estate, in 1994 he began investing in clean energy projects, according to the 2014 book China's Tycoons. Starting with a hydroelectric dam in his home province of Guandong, Li built six more dams in Yunnan, then expanded into wind farms and solar power. His company Hanenergy Holdings bought three Western, thin-film solar businesses in 2013 and a fourth, Alta Devices, in 2014. Li, who is China's richest man, added $3 billion to his wealth in March after Hanenergy's stock rose 36 percent in two days, according to Forbes.

Zhu Gongshan, Chairman, GCL-Poly Energy Holdings. $1.9 billion. Jiangsu province native Zhi Gongshan started out building coal-powered and biomass generators, with help from the powerful Poly Group. As GCL Group's largest shareholder, Poly Group had historical ties to the Chinese army and former Premier Deng Xiaoping. By the mid-2000s Zhu had a vision to produce polysilicon, the raw material for photovoltaics. He invested $1.15 billion in a unit to produce the material and signed long-term supply contracts with solar panel makers. In 2014 his company bought a 68 percent stake in Same Time Holdings, a manufacturer of printed circuit boards, which will invest in solar power plants.


https://www.fool.com/investing/general/ ... nergy.aspx


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 15236
PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2020 5:39 pm
 




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 24 posts ]  1  2  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 22 guests




 
     
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner.
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © Canadaka.net. Powered by © phpBB.