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PostPosted: Sun Aug 15, 2021 3:33 pm
 


'A very dark time': Canada shuts down embassy in Afghanistan, citing safety concerns
$1:
Canadians working to evacuate allies from Afghanistan described chaos, fear and disappointment on Sunday as Canada shut down its embassy in Kabul and suspended diplomatic relations amid a Taliban advance in the capital.

The federal government said the situation in Afghanistan poses "serious challenges" to its ability to ensure safety and security at the embassy.

"After consulting with Canada's Ambassador to Afghanistan, the decision was made to temporarily suspend our diplomatic operations in Kabul," the federal ministers of foreign affairs, immigration and defence said in a joint statement.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 15, 2021 3:40 pm
 


Hell, at least the South Vietnamese put up a fight for a couple of years before they finally gave up. Between this in A-Stan and the sight of the Iraqi army fleeing in sheer terror away from ISIS a few years back one would think that the western concept of nation-building in some worthless foreign shithole might not have much evidence of success behind it.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 15, 2021 3:49 pm
 


Exactly. We can't fix Afghanistan, nor should we. They don't want to be fixed, and we shouldn't be sacrificing our own in some misguided attempt to help them. It's far past the time to let them do their own thing and butt out.

-J.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 15, 2021 4:02 pm
 


I think the bigger crime here is that once again another country that made the mistake of believing the US was on their side is going to get ripped to shreds while the Americans watch from a safe distance. And as a huge portion of the quite safe & comfortable US population says such wonderful things like "why don't they do it for themselves like we did?", as if any MAGA slob in a red hat in the year 2021 has even the slightest idea of what their own Revolutionary War was like in terms of struggle, torment, and sacrifice. Or "it's not our problem, why should we fix anyone else's country for them?", even after the US has done more than it's fair share to shatter the ability of far too many countries to even function on the most basic levels.

The West blew the shit out of Afghanistan for twenty years and is now walking away. If anything the smarter people in these countries we turn into our victims should start looking for the exit the second the US says "we're on your side!" because inevitably the Americans are going to fuck off to somewhere else and leave the poorest guy at the table to pay for the dinner.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 15, 2021 11:56 pm
 


Some of the more obvious reasons why Afghanistan disintegrated in the space of a few days:

https://www.rawstory.com/the-pentagon-m ... ghan-army/

$1:
Washington (AFP) - The collapse of the Afghan army that allowed Taliban fighters to take control of Kabul cast a stark light on errors committed over 20 years by the Pentagon as it spent billions of dollars in Afghanistan.

The wrong equipment

Washington spent $83 billion in its effort to create a modern army mirroring its own. In practical terms, that meant huge dependence on air support and a high-tech communications network in a country where only 30 percent of the population can count on a reliable electricity supply.

Airplanes, helicopters, drones, armored vehicles, night-vision goggles: the United States spared no expense in equipping the Afghan army. It recently even provided the Afghans with the latest Black Hawk attack helicopters.

But the Afghans -- many of them illiterate young men in a country lacking the infrastructure to support cutting-edge military equipment -- were unable to mount a serious resistance against a less-equipped and ostensibly badly outnumbered foe.

Their capabilities were seriously overestimated, according to John Sopko, the US special inspector general for Afghanistan reconstruction (SIGAR).

Each time he tried to evaluate the Afghan army, he said, "the US military changed the goalposts, and made it easier to show success. And then finally, when they couldn't even do that, they classified the assessment tool.

"So they knew how bad the Afghan military was."

His office's latest report to Congress, filed last week, said that "advanced weapons systems, vehicles and logistics used by Western militaries were beyond the capabilities of the largely illiterate and uneducated Afghan force."

Exaggerated numbers

For months, Pentagon officials have insisted on what they said was the numerical advantage held by the Afghan forces -- supposedly with 300,000 men in the army and the police -- over the Taliban, estimated to number some 70,000.

But those army numbers were greatly inflated, according to the Combating Terrorism Center at the prestigious US Military Academy at West Point, New York.

As of July 2020, by its own estimate, the 300,000 included only 185,000 army troops or special operations forces under Defense Ministry control, with police and other security personnel making up the rest.

And barely 60 percent of the Afghan army troops were trained fighters, the West Point analysts said.

A more accurate estimate of the army's fighting strength -- once the 8,000 air force personnel are taken out of the equation -- is 96,000, they concluded.

The SIGAR report said desertions have always been a problem for the Afghan army.

It found that in 2020, the Afghan army had to replace 25 percent of its force each year -- largely because of desertions -- and that American soldiers working with the Afghans came to see this rate as "normal."

Half-hearted promises

American officials have repeatedly vowed that they would continue to support the Afghan army after August 31 -- the date announced for completing the withdrawal of US troops -- but they have never explained how this would be done logistically.

During his last visit to Kabul, in May, US Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin raised the possibility of helping the Afghans maintain their air force -- from afar -- through an approach he called "over the horizon" logistics.

That vague concept implied the use of virtual training sessions with video conferencing on the Zoom platform -- an approach that seems illusory given the need for the Afghans to have computers or smartphones with well-functioning wi-fi connections.

Ronald Neumann, a former US ambassador to Kabul, believes the American military "could have taken more time" to withdraw.

The agreement reached by the Trump administration with the Taliban called for a complete withdrawal of foreign forces by May 1.

Trump's successor Joe Biden pushed that date back, originally to September 11 before changing it again to August 31.

But he also decided to withdraw all American citizens from the country, including the contractors who play a key role in supporting US logistics there.

"We built an air force that depended on contractors for maintenance and then pulled the contractors," Neumann, who was ambassador under President George W. Bush, told NPR public radio.

Unpaid and unfed

Worse, the salaries of the Afghan army had been paid for years by the Pentagon. But from the moment the American army announced its planned withdrawal in April, responsibility for those payments fell on the Kabul government.

Numerous Afghan soldiers have complained on social media that they not only have not been paid in months, in many instances their units were no longer receiving food or supplies -- not even ammunition.

The rapid US withdrawal provided a final blow.

"We profoundly shocked the Afghan army and morale by pulling out and pulling our air cover," said Neumann.


It was a Potemkin Village from start to finish, both the Afghan military and national government. And now the Taliban, who are nothing else but patient, have years to learn to use the billions of dollars worth of high-tech equipment they've captured which some day down the road makes them a very serious threat to the other states surrounding Afghanistan.

Today is really just the first day of the countdown until the next war springs out of Afghanistan. Only next time it will be much worse simply because the Taliban, and whatever Al Qaeda type of terrorist organization they allow to harbour there, has just been massively armed to the fucking teeth courtesy of the US government, military, and taxpayer. :|


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 8:31 am
 


CDN_PATRIOT CDN_PATRIOT:
Exactly. We can't fix Afghanistan, nor should we. They don't want to be fixed, and we shouldn't be sacrificing our own in some misguided attempt to help them. It's far past the time to let them do their own thing and butt out.

-J.


You are correct that the country likely cannot be 'fixed' into a democracy.

However, the Taliban previously allowed Al Qaeda and other Islamic terror groups to train in the country and that led to 9/11, the Bali bombings, 7/11 in London, and dozens of other terror attacks.

That can never be allowed again.

The West should immediately warn the Taliban that if they ever see a terrorist training camp set up in Afghanistan again, they will not only bomb it into oblivion, but also other targets in the country, be it infrastructure, the residences of known Taliban leaders, etc.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 2:27 pm
 




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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 2:43 pm
 


So it was the equipment then.
It wasn't that we were propping up a corrupt, inept gov't that didn't pay the soldiers. We were supposed to pay for them I suppose.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 2:54 pm
 




The long war blog

Best army money can buy. Thanks BUSH!!!


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 3:39 pm
 


TDPS on latest


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 3:48 pm
 




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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 4:30 pm
 




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PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2021 6:41 pm
 




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