CKA Forums
Login 
canadian forums
bottom
 
 
Canadian Forums

Author Topic Options
Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 41533
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 6:18 am
 


Strutz Strutz:
bootlegga bootlegga:
I doubt most existing condo buildings have the financial wherewithal to install several hundred charging ports, so we'll need some sort of program, either government run grants or private sector investment to make that a reality. Obviously, you'd pay whomever installs the charging port for your electricity, much like you pay a gas station for your gas. I'd prefer some sort of system that lets me choose the provider, much the same way I can choose to get my gas from any gas station.

The condo complex I live in (3 adjoining buildings, 185 units) addressed installing charging stations (2 I think it was) in our AGM in January 2020. It was going to be at a cost of $15,000 to be taken from the contingency fund. It would have taken away 2 visitor spots, which we have few of, and would have been accessible to anyone not even living there. It was shot down. For whatever reason the question did not come up in the 2021 AGM.


The same outlets that provides power for block heaters in the winter could be used to charge EVs. The only thing is they are usually cycled 15 minutes on, 15 minutes off so they don't cost the owner too much.

Most EVs come with an adapter that lets you charge from a normal 120v wall outlet. It just takes a lot longer than using a fast charger. But if it's sitting there overnight, that isn't a problem because pretty rarely would you need a full charge.


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 41533
Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 22255
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 10:30 am
 


Strutz Strutz:
bootlegga bootlegga:
I doubt most existing condo buildings have the financial wherewithal to install several hundred charging ports, so we'll need some sort of program, either government run grants or private sector investment to make that a reality. Obviously, you'd pay whomever installs the charging port for your electricity, much like you pay a gas station for your gas. I'd prefer some sort of system that lets me choose the provider, much the same way I can choose to get my gas from any gas station.


The condo complex I live in (3 adjoining buildings, 185 units) addressed installing charging stations (2 I think it was) in our AGM in January 2020. It was going to be at a cost of $15,000 to be taken from the contingency fund. It would have taken away 2 visitor spots, which we have few of, and would have been accessible to anyone not even living there. It was shot down. For whatever reason the question did not come up in the 2021 AGM.


From what I understand, you can set up a fast charger to require a payment (credit card or app) to prevent casual travellers from 'stealing' your electricity, although some places like malls and libraries may offer free charging.

I would think that any building that built a fast charger for each resident would also install some sort of keypad to prevent that kind of theft, because each resident would have to pay for that power, much like we pay for electricity in our homes/condos.



DrCaleb DrCaleb:
The same outlets that provides power for block heaters in the winter could be used to charge EVs. The only thing is they are usually cycled 15 minutes on, 15 minutes off so they don't cost the owner too much.

Most EVs come with an adapter that lets you charge from a normal 120v wall outlet. It just takes a lot longer than using a fast charger. But if it's sitting there overnight, that isn't a problem because pretty rarely would you need a full charge.


From what I've seen, plugging a Tesla into a regular 120 volt outlet only charges the vehicle 2 to 4 miles per hour, so an overnight charge (say from 7 pm to 7 am), would only add between 24 and 48 miles (38 to 77 km) range, which may not be enough in a cold Canadian winter.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 22255
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 10:35 am
 


DrCaleb DrCaleb:


R=UP

For all the grief Alberta gets for producing oil, the fact is that Alberta has long produced a lot of wind power, typically ranking third nationally each year for total MW generated.

Image

https://www.nrcan.gc.ca/science-and-dat ... acts/20069


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 41533
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 10:38 am
 


bootlegga bootlegga:

DrCaleb DrCaleb:
The same outlets that provides power for block heaters in the winter could be used to charge EVs. The only thing is they are usually cycled 15 minutes on, 15 minutes off so they don't cost the owner too much.

Most EVs come with an adapter that lets you charge from a normal 120v wall outlet. It just takes a lot longer than using a fast charger. But if it's sitting there overnight, that isn't a problem because pretty rarely would you need a full charge.


From what I've seen, plugging a Tesla into a regular 120 volt outlet only charges the vehicle 2 to 4 miles per hour, so an overnight charge (say from 7 pm to 7 am), would only add between 24 and 48 miles (38 to 77 km) range, which may not be enough in a cold Canadian winter.


60km is the average Canadians's daily round trip. And plugging it in would keep the batteries warm in the winter, saving some power for travel instead of heating.

People have been winter driving these things for a while. I see several EVs in the parking lot in the winter at work. (in the before time)

There have also been 2 different cross Canada trips. The only commonality is that the further North you go, the worse the fast charging system is. East/West, it's pretty good, and in all major cities. And you can always get a fast charger installed at your home. :)


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 41533
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 10:39 am
 


bootlegga bootlegga:


The abbreviation 'alta.' still bugs me. People from Onio perpetuate it.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 10544
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 10:51 am
 


As that chart isn't labelled I assume from the list of links it refers to "capacity for solar".
That's why BC is so low, we need sideways windmills that were powered by raindrops. But of course every hundred years we have a summer like 2021 when it's sunny, so opponents would use that to discredit the idea.
You know, the "IT isn't 100% perfect so don't waste money trying it" crowd who use that on everything from vaccines to alternate energy.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 22255
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 2:05 pm
 


No, that chart is for wind power, not solar.


Offline
CKA Elite
CKA Elite
 Calgary Flames


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 3584
PostPosted: Tue Aug 24, 2021 2:54 pm
 


I'll just leave this here....

https://www.facebook.com/reapers.holland/posts/6049397448434941

8O


-J.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 10544
PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2021 10:22 am
 


bootlegga bootlegga:
No, that chart is for wind power, not solar.

Then I'm surprised Alberta isn't higher. Ever driven down Hwy22? Crosswinds blow semis off the road all the time.
Where I live the damn wind blows almost all the time. Proposed a windmill to power a moiuntaintop radio site decades ago, the local Corn-servatives were dead set against it the mere thought that one was there, even if they couldn't see it triggered them.
SO now CBC abandoned it's site, too costly to keep repairing the powerline. The ther TV and radio transmitters, wireless Internet goes down for days at a time. No shit, runs out the fuel in the backup generators waiting for repair crews - plows in winter - even rebuilding the access road.


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 41533
PostPosted: Thu Aug 26, 2021 10:50 am
 


CDN_PATRIOT CDN_PATRIOT:


See! That's what happens when you let someone else think for you. Just looking at it I can see it's half bullshit.

Most manufacturers warranty batteries for 8 years. If used to the maximum rating of 80% of full charge, at 60km average round trip daily, that should be about 17 year life.

$1:
The bottom line here is that if it’s properly cared for, an electric car’s battery pack should last for well in excess of 100,000 miles before its range becomes restricted. Consumer Reports estimates the average EV battery pack’s lifespan to be at around 200,000 miles, which is nearly 17 years of use if driven 12,000 miles per year.


https://www.myev.com/research/ev-101/ho ... ttery-last

That takes them to 80% charge. After the are used in cars, they can be used in stationary batteries for storing renewable energy.

https://www.mckinsey.com/industries/aut ... gy-storage

And once they are no longer needed there, they can be recycled. Currently to 97%, but in 20 years??

$1:
VW recently announced a pilot plant for battery recycling which will work towards a target of recycling 97% of battery components. In this process, batteries will be shredded, dried, then sieved to recover valuable materials that can be used to make new batteries.


https://www.edfenergy.com/electric-cars/batteries


What do you want to bet that the remaining unattributed 'facts' in the Facebook post are also bullshit? (Because Facebook posters are always reliable, right?)


Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 71 posts ]  Previous  1  2  3  4  5



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 17 guests




 
     
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner.
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © Canadaka.net. Powered by © phpBB.