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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:15 am
 


Title: Hotter heat waves are wiping out bumblebees, study finds
Category: Environmental
Posted By: DrCaleb
Date: 2020-02-07 06:19:20
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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:15 am
 


Oh, I get it!
We are not supposed to make any connection between the death of insects and the pervasive use of insecticides!
We must point our fingers at GlowBull Climate War-Mongering Change because then it is our fault!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:19 am
 


Even school children know the difference between commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees. :roll:


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 8:21 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Even school children know the difference between commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees. :roll:



R=UP


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:03 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Even school children know the difference between commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees. :roll:


Yes, everyone knows that commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees don't pollinate the same flowers.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:11 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
Even school children know the difference between commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees. :roll:


Yes, everyone knows that commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees don't pollinate the same flowers.


No one said they don't.

But that isn't what the study was focused on, was it?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:20 am
 


The study is drawing a conclusion (heatwaves are 100% the cause) that is not sufficiently supported by data.

800,000 people left California between 2010 and 2020 and I could just as easily blame heat waves based upon this methodology. But that's not why they left.

A study that did not set out to validate global warming as a cause for the decline in bumblebee populations came from the US Department of Agriculture in 2017 and note that the study was started and principally completed during the Obama years.

https://data.nal.usda.gov/dataset/data- ... umble-bees

Quote:
Data from: Patterns of Widespread Decline in North American Bumble Bees

Bumble bees (Bombus) are vitally important pollinators of wild plants and agricultural crops worldwide. Fragmentary observations, however, have suggested population declines in several North American species. Despite rising concern over these observations in the United States, highlighted in a recent National Academy of Sciences report, a national assessment of the geographic scope and possible causal factors of bumble bee decline is lacking. Here, we report results of a 3-y interdisciplinary study of changing distributions, population genetic structure, and levels of pathogen infection in bumble bee populations across the United States. We compare current and historical distributions of eight species, compiling a database of >73,000 museum records for comparison with data from intensive nationwide surveys of >16,000 specimens. We show that the relative abundances of four species have declined by up to 96% and that their surveyed geographic ranges have contracted by 23–87%, some within the last 20 y. We also show that declining populations have significantly higher infection levels of the microsporidian pathogen Nosema bombi and lower genetic diversity compared with co-occurring populations of the stable (nondeclining) species. Higher pathogen prevalence and reduced genetic diversity are, thus, realistic predictors of these alarming patterns of decline in North America, although cause and effect remain uncertain.

Bumble bees (Bombus) are integral wild pollinators within native plant communities throughout temperate ecosystems, and recent domestication has boosted their economic importance in crop pollination to a level surpassed only by the honey bee. Their robust size, long tongues, and buzz-pollination behavior (high-frequency buzzing to release pollen from flowers) significantly increase the efficiency of pollen transfer in multibillion dollar crops such as tomatoes and berries. Disturbing reports of bumble bee population declines in Europe have recently spilled over into North America, fueling environmental and economic concerns of global decline. However, the evidence for large-scale range reductions across North America is lacking. Many reports of decline are unpublished, and the few published studies are limited to independent local surveys in northern California/southern Oregon, Ontario, Canada, and Illinois.

Furthermore, causal factors leading to the alleged decline of bumble bee populations in North America remain speculative. One compelling but untested hypothesis for the cause of decline in the United States entails the spread of a putatively introduced pathogen, Nosema bombi, which is an obligate intracellular microsporidian parasite found commonly in bumble bees throughout Europe but largely unstudied in North America. Pathogenic effects of N. bombi may vary depending on the host species and reproductive caste and include reductions in colony growth and individual life span and fitness. Population genetic factors could also play a role in Bombus population decline. For instance, small effective population sizes and reduced gene flow among fragmented habitats can result in losses of genetic diversity with negative consequences, and the detrimental impacts of these genetic factors can be especially intensified in bees. Population genetic studies of Bombus are rare worldwide. A single study in the United States identified lower genetic diversity and elevated genetic differentiation (FST) among Illinois populations of the putatively declining B. pensylvanicus relative to those of a codistributed stable species. Similar patterns have been observed in comparative studies of some European species, but most investigations have been geographically restricted and based on limited sampling within and among populations.

Although the investigations to date have provided important information on the increasing rarity of some bumble bee species in local populations, the different survey protocols and limited geographic scope of these studies cannot fully capture the general patterns necessary to evaluate the underlying processes or overall gravity of declines. Furthermore, valid tests of the N. bombi hypothesis and its risk to populations across North America call for data on its geographic distribution and infection prevalence among species. Likewise, testing the general importance of population genetic factors in bumble bee decline requires genetic comparisons derived from sampling of multiple stable and declining populations on a large geographic scale. From such range-wide comparisons, we provide incontrovertible evidence that multiple Bombus species have experienced sharp population declines at the national level. We also show that declining populations are associated with both high N. bombi infection levels and low genetic diversity.

This data was used in the paper "Patterns of widespread decline in North American bumble bees" published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of United States of America.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:29 am
 


Must be the Beeees


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 9:45 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
The study is drawing a conclusion (heatwaves are 100% the cause) that is not sufficiently supported by data.


Really? Which part of the data does not support their conclusions?

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/367/6478/685


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 11:00 am
 


PluggyRug wrote:
Must be the Beeees

https://www.salary.com/research/cost-of ... chicago-il

There is more to socio-economic situations than average income.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 11:09 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
The study is drawing a conclusion (heatwaves are 100% the cause) that is not sufficiently supported by data.

800,000 people left California between 2010 and 2020 and I could just as easily blame heat waves based upon this methodology. But that's not why they left.

A study that did not set out to validate global warming as a cause for the decline in bumblebee populations came from the US Department of Agriculture in 2017 and note that the study was started and principally completed during the Obama years.

It actually came from the University of Illinois in 2011. Quote from the lead author then.

Quote:
Researchers have many hypotheses about what is causing the declines, but none have been proven, Cameron said. Climate change appears to play a role in the declines in some bumble bee species in Europe, she said. Habitat loss may also contribute to the loss of some specialist species, she said. Low genetic diversity and high infection rates with the parasite pathogen are also prime suspects.

"Whether it's one of these or all of the above, we need to be aware of these declines," Cameron said. "It may be that the role that these four species play in pollinating plants could be taken up by other species of bumble bees. But if additional species begin to fall out due to things we're not aware of, we could be in trouble."


https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 101359.htm


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 12:28 pm
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Even school children know the difference between commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees. :roll:

Get stung by one of each and you too can tell the difference :lol:


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 12:52 pm
 


fifeboy wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
Even school children know the difference between commercial honeybees and wild bumblebees. :roll:

Get stung by one of each and you too can tell the difference :lol:


I've never been stung by a bee.

Yellowjackets though. They are assholes.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 1:17 pm
 


Strange, even though it's cold here, I don't see any bumblebees. :?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 07, 2020 1:21 pm
 


But you have Alligators!


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