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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:25 pm
 


Title: How one heatwave killed 'a third' of a bat species in Australia
Category: Environmental
Posted By: DrCaleb
Date: 2019-01-16 09:15:06


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 16, 2019 3:25 pm
 


"Last week, researchers from Western Sydney University finalised their conclusion that about 23,000 spectacled flying foxes died in the event on 26 and 27 November.

[clip]

'He sees the bats as the "the canary in the coal mine for climate change".

Really? Bats are the Canary in the coal mine now, are they. It's no longer Polar Bears, then? Probably not - embarrassing population increases there.

So now it's bats, is it?

Well you missed a few BBC.

Wind Turbines Kill More Than 600,000 Bats A Year. What Should We Do?

https://www.popsci.com/blog-network/eek ... ould-we-do


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 17, 2019 1:43 pm
 


Numbers matter. There can be serious problems for an ecosystem long before a species disappears completely:

Quote:
Scientists have begun to speak of functional extinction (as opposed to the more familiar kind, numerical extinction). Functionally extinct animals and plants are still present but no longer prevalent enough to affect how an ecosystem works. Some phrase this as the extinction not of a species but of all its former interactions with its environment — an extinction of seed dispersal and predation and pollination and all the other ecological functions an animal once had, which can be devastating even if some individuals still persist. The more interactions are lost, the more disordered the ecosystem becomes. A 2013 paper in Nature, which modeled both natural and computer-generated food webs, suggested that a loss of even 30 percent of a species’ abundance can be so destabilizing that other species start going fully, numerically extinct — in fact, 80 percent of the time it was a secondarily affected creature that was the first to disappear. A famous real-world example of this type of cascade concerns sea otters. When they were nearly wiped out in the northern Pacific, their prey, sea urchins, ballooned in number and decimated kelp forests, turning a rich environment into a barren one and also possibly contributing to numerical extinctions, notably of the Steller’s sea cow.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/maga ... lypse.html


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