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CKA Uber
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2021 1:24 pm
 


bootlegga bootlegga:


Late reply but the worst punishment this clown got wasn't going to jail. It was losing the Costco membership for the rest of his miserable life. :twisted:


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CKA Uber
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PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2021 1:32 pm
 


What a piece of shit.


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2021 1:45 pm
 


Thanos Thanos:
bootlegga bootlegga:


Late reply but the worst punishment this clown got wasn't going to jail. It was losing the Costco membership for the rest of his miserable life. :twisted:


I didn't know that, but it's yet another reason to shop at Costco instead. :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2021 1:51 pm
 


Costco's new ad is just "come for the great discount on winter tires, stay for the freakish anti-mask/anti-vaxx floor show". 8)


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2021 12:35 pm
 


Another example of why we need to keep on top of the Police and hold them to account:

$1:
Head of Alberta's beleaguered police watchdog agency resigns

The head of Alberta's publicly funded police watchdog agency has resigned, signalling what critics say is a long-foreshadowed breakdown in the chronically underfunded police watchdog agency.

Susan Hughson, executive director of the Alberta Serious Incident Response Team (ASIRT), submitted her resignation Tuesday morning.

Hughson confirmed her resignation but declined further comment.

"It (ASIRT) is in disarray," said Edmonton criminal defence lawyer Tom Engel, whose firm specializes in complaints against police.

"They have no leadership and I don't know what they are going to do to try to replace these people," said Engel, who noted assistant ASIRT executive director Greg Gudelot recently left, as have other ASIRT staff who have either quit or retired.

"It is not like a toxic workplace or something like that. It is just a frustration that they can't do their job."

Engel said the loss of Hughson is a huge blow to the agency.

"She has been an excellent executive director," he said. "She has done her best with limited resources and under her leadership, generally, investigations have been thorough and objective."

...

Hughson's resignation follows a recent controversial decision by Alberta's Crown Prosecution Service to stay an assault charge laid by ASIRT against an Edmonton police officer following a two-year investigation.

Const. Dylan Awid was captured on cellphone video by several citizens in June 2019 repeatedly kicking and then slamming a handcuffed prisoner headfirst into a brick wall.

The Crown said the evidence didn't meet its standard for prosecution.

Former British Columbia solicitor general Kash Heed told CBC News it was one of the worst cases of police abuse he had ever seen. He said the Crown's decision should be the subject of a judicial review.

In October, the prosecution service also refused to prosecute a Sherwood Park RCMP officer, with a history of assault complaints, who slapped a handcuffed prisoner in the face. The Crown said there was insufficient evidence.

...

The agency has been hamstrung by chronic underfunding for years.

In February, Hughson told the Edmonton Police Commission that the agency was at "a critical breaking point" as it struggled to investigate a growing backlog of files dating back as far as 2018.

Hughson told the commission the funding problem for her 30-member team has existed since 2014.

But she said she didn't expect current Justice Minister and Solicitor General Kaycee Madu to provide any additional funding.


https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton ... -1.6261506



If you don't like the answers, defund the investigators. Or tell Albertans that they need their own police service.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 02, 2021 8:44 am
 


$1:
Alberta Utilities Commission investigators want probe of ATCO dealings on TMX camps

Investigators at the Alberta Utilities Commission are asking the regulator to look into what they say is illegal behaviour by one of the province’s largest and most prominent homegrown companies.

They allege ATCO Electric deliberately overpaid a British Columbia First Nation by millions for work on a new transmission line in order to secure lucrative contracts providing construction camps for the Trans Mountain Expansion oil pipeline project.

ATCO then tried to pass that overpayment on to Alberta consumers, says a public document from the commission’s enforcement branch on its website.

The document also alleges company management was aware the arrangement was questionable and tried to cover its tracks.

“ATCO Electric has violated (its) fundamental duty of honesty and candour to its regulator — the duty upon which the entire regulatory system relies to function efficiently and effectively,” says the document filed Nov. 29.

Company president Melanie Bayley says ATCO — a global $22-billion business based in Calgary, with recognized expertise in electricity transmission and logistics — went astray.

“There’s no doubt that there were mistakes here,” she told The Canadian Press on Tuesday.

But she said the problem is rooted in an attempt to build capacity among the Simpcw First Nation in Barriere, B.C.


https://www.todayville.com/edmonton/alb ... tmx-camps/


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 7:25 am
 


Banned for decades, releasing oilsands tailings water is now on the horizon


Externalize cost, internalize profit. Fuck the Environment.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 8:33 am
 


DrCaleb DrCaleb:
Banned for decades, releasing oilsands tailings water is now on the horizon


Externalize cost, internalize profit. Fuck the Environment.

The price of doing business.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 9:51 am
 


hmm, wasn't aware of the growing sizes of the tailings ponds, but I guess it makes sense. I suppose the option of indefinite storage is fraught with its own perils.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 10:26 am
 


Zipperfish Zipperfish:
hmm, wasn't aware of the growing sizes of the tailings ponds, but I guess it makes sense. I suppose the option of indefinite storage is fraught with its own perils.


But that is the way it has to be. From working at the Syncrude Research Facility, I learnt the major problem with oilsands extraction is clay in the soil. The extraction process turns some of the clay ionic. So it settles out of the water very slowly, and the only effective treatment is re-ionization. They cheap way to do that is sunlight. Shallow tailings ponds will eventually precipitate the clay, or they could distill the water, filter or apply large voltages to re-ionize the clay.

But that leaves the remainder of the tailings very toxic, with trace heavy metals and things left behind.

To me, that is the cost of using natural resources. They should be returned in the condition they were collected. Anything less is a cost to the public. They can have ever growing tailings ponds, or pay the cost to purify the water.

But partially treating it and dumping it back into the river isn't an option for the people down river who depend on the river for their groceries. They shouldn't have to choose between toxic tailings or toxic rivers.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 10:27 am
 


Zipperfish Zipperfish:
hmm, wasn't aware of the growing sizes of the tailings ponds, but I guess it makes sense. I suppose the option of indefinite storage is fraught with its own perils.

Kinda makes you wonder why they didn't think of or plan for, the inevitable.

EDIT: Not expecting an answer. The oil sands would not have been profitable if cleaning up had been added to the cost. Not sure about you guys, but this is not a business model I like. Sorry Thanos, but they should have left the oil in the sand and waited.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 10:42 am
 


raydan raydan:
Zipperfish Zipperfish:
hmm, wasn't aware of the growing sizes of the tailings ponds, but I guess it makes sense. I suppose the option of indefinite storage is fraught with its own perils.

Kinda makes you wonder why they didn't think of or plan for, the inevitable.

EDIT: Not expecting an answer. The oil sands would not have been profitable if cleaning up had been added to the cost. Not sure about you guys, but this is not a business model I like. Sorry Thanos, but they should have left the oil in the sand and waited.


They knew the results when they started the testing plants just west of the Fort McMurray town site.

The problem is there is just so much of it! That amount of money is tempting for any government, such that they will find a way to exploit it. Even if environmental regulations have to be changed to accommodate its exploitation.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 06, 2021 11:05 am
 


raydan raydan:
Sorry Thanos, but they should have left the oil in the sand and waited.


Meh, I don't get mad anymore, not since my eyes were fully opened over the past several years to the uncomfortable reality that Alberta's been the worst managed province in all of Canada and one of the worst managed governments in North America. No one though of anything except developing as fast as they could, in order to score the most immediate profits possible. And the royalty system got deliberately botched as badly as one could ever imagine simply from not increasing the provincial take when the prices were high. All our own fault, no one else's.

Keep in mind that there's no place in Canada, North America, or in most of the world that would have "left it in the ground" either. Everyone else would have done the same thing too. The only way they wouldn't have would have been if they'd been paid by the government not to, the same way farmers sometimes get paid not to grow certain crops if they're creating a glut. And, even with Alberta being the worst managed place in Canada, it's not like anyone else has a very good record either. There's no saints in the country, no matter how much certain people & places like to project a thoroughly false image that they're somehow so far above it all that it practically makes them holy.


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