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PostPosted: Mon Aug 22, 2011 8:10 pm
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:

Give me the option of providing better care for my family and not have to settle for slow service and terrible wait times.

B.C. LEADS COUNTRY IN MEETING WAIT TIME BENCHMARKS

$1:
B.C. has made tremendous gains in improving access to surgeries. Since 2001, the Province has significantly reduced median waits in key areas:



· Median waits for open heart surgery have fallen from 15.1 to 6.9 weeks.





· Hip replacement waits have been reduced from 18.7 weeks to 10.1 weeks.

· The wait for knee replacements has almost been cut in half from 25.4 weeks to 13.1 weeks.


Summary totals for each procedure within a facility


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 5:53 am
 


BeaverFever BeaverFever:
Urgent care gets priority treatment.

Do you want lower taxes or better wait times? I think 6-8 months is an outdated figure, I just looked on the MHLTC site and the shortest wait time for a non-urgent MRI in Toronto is 33 days. I don't think that's so bad, but I get that regardless of how minor the condition is, people want care immediately.


I want better wait times.

I have no problem where taxes are today.

A personal experience for you.

After ignoring symptoms for a while, I finally went to the Dr with what most told me was all the signs of MS. Loss of vision. Dizziness, numbness, tremors, the list goes on.

I waited 6 months to get into an MRI for my brain and that's because I was willing to go in at 6:15am.

When you're having a difficult time seeing, when your balance is so off that you're having a hard time walking up and down stairs (keep in mind, I'm only 31) it would be nice to get some treatment and not wait half a year to find out what's wrong.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 6:02 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:
BeaverFever BeaverFever:
Urgent care gets priority treatment.

Do you want lower taxes or better wait times? I think 6-8 months is an outdated figure, I just looked on the MHLTC site and the shortest wait time for a non-urgent MRI in Toronto is 33 days. I don't think that's so bad, but I get that regardless of how minor the condition is, people want care immediately.


I want better wait times.

I have no problem where taxes are today.

A personal experience for you.

After ignoring symptoms for a while, I finally went to the Dr with what most told me was all the signs of MS. Loss of vision. Dizziness, numbness, tremors, the list goes on.

I waited 6 months to get into an MRI for my brain and that's because I was willing to go in at 6:15am.

When you're having a difficult time seeing, when your balance is so off that you're having a hard time walking up and down stairs (keep in mind, I'm only 31) it would be nice to get some treatment and not wait half a year to find out what's wrong.

You had the option to pay and go elsewhere but you didn't. We already have a two tier system in Canada which you did not participate in. You had the option of paying out of your pocket (which you said you wanted) and going across to the US and have it done immediately............which you didn't.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 6:07 am
 


Scape Scape:
You break the law of the land you should pay the price.
Amen to this universal principle.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 6:48 am
 


Regina Regina:
OnTheIce OnTheIce:
BeaverFever BeaverFever:
Urgent care gets priority treatment.

Do you want lower taxes or better wait times? I think 6-8 months is an outdated figure, I just looked on the MHLTC site and the shortest wait time for a non-urgent MRI in Toronto is 33 days. I don't think that's so bad, but I get that regardless of how minor the condition is, people want care immediately.


I want better wait times.

I have no problem where taxes are today.

A personal experience for you.

After ignoring symptoms for a while, I finally went to the Dr with what most told me was all the signs of MS. Loss of vision. Dizziness, numbness, tremors, the list goes on.

I waited 6 months to get into an MRI for my brain and that's because I was willing to go in at 6:15am.

When you're having a difficult time seeing, when your balance is so off that you're having a hard time walking up and down stairs (keep in mind, I'm only 31) it would be nice to get some treatment and not wait half a year to find out what's wrong.

You had the option to pay and go elsewhere but you didn't. We already have a two tier system in Canada which you did not participate in. You had the option of paying out of your pocket (which you said you wanted) and going across to the US and have it done immediately............which you didn't.


Because we have the option of getting care from another Country that's close to us, doesn't mean that we here in Canada have an actual "two tiered system"....it means we're lucky to have the US as neighbours if we need quick medical services.

Try telling that to someone in Northern Ontario. "It's only a 10 hour drive, look how lucky you are".

And yes, I could have looked to the US for the MRI, as I have taken advantage of the US system in the past, but I felt like I could stick it out as trying to get transportation was too much of a pain in the ass on the family at the time.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:27 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:
Because we have the option of getting care from another Country that's close to us, doesn't mean that we here in Canada have an actual "two tiered system"....it means we're lucky to have the US as neighbours if we need quick medical services.

Try telling that to someone in Northern Ontario. "It's only a 10 hour drive, look how lucky you are".

And yes, I could have looked to the US for the MRI, as I have taken advantage of the US system in the past, but I felt like I could stick it out as trying to get transportation was too much of a pain in the ass on the family at the time.

I live in Northern Ontario and am 20 minutes from the US border. And actually is does mean was have a two tier system because even the provincial governments use the US facilities for overflow. A two tier system in Canada will never work. It's either one or the other. We have one the US has the other which we can use anytime we like.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:38 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:


A personal experience for you.

After ignoring symptoms for a while, I finally went to the Dr with what most told me was all the signs of MS. Loss of vision. Dizziness, numbness, tremors, the list goes on.

I waited 6 months to get into an MRI for my brain and that's because I was willing to go in at 6:15am.

When you're having a difficult time seeing, when your balance is so off that you're having a hard time walking up and down stairs (keep in mind, I'm only 31) it would be nice to get some treatment and not wait half a year to find out what's wrong.

Five years ago an MRI of my cervical spine showed signs of MS which is damage to the milan sheath of my spinal cord. To rule it out I was booked and had another MRI and an EMG within weeks. I showed no other symptoms other than numbness in my arm. My family doctor made it happen and yours should have done the same. All my MRIs have been done in the evening which is quite convenient too.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 7:45 am
 


Maybe by Northern Ontario he meant Churchill, not the north end of Toronto.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:12 am
 


DanSC DanSC:
Maybe by Northern Ontario he meant Churchill, not the north end of Toronto.

Churchill is in Manitoba. 8O

According to the 2006 Canadian Census, nearly 25 million people, or more than four-fifths of Canadians live in urban areas. Ninety percent of the Canadian population lives within 100 miles of the U.S. border. This means that the overwhelming majority of the Canadian population is easily reachable through traditional distribution routes.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:37 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:
I want better wait times.

I have no problem where taxes are today.

A personal experience for you.

After ignoring symptoms for a while, I finally went to the Dr with what most told me was all the signs of MS. Loss of vision. Dizziness, numbness, tremors, the list goes on.

I waited 6 months to get into an MRI for my brain and that's because I was willing to go in at 6:15am.

When you're having a difficult time seeing, when your balance is so off that you're having a hard time walking up and down stairs (keep in mind, I'm only 31) it would be nice to get some treatment and not wait half a year to find out what's wrong.


That sucks, but here's another story for you to consider.

My sister fell and destroyed her knee while shovelling snow here one winter. To determine the extent of the damage and seriousness of the injury, she got an MRI the very next day, and surgery within the week.

I agree that your symptoms probably should have gotten you an MRI sooner, but your doctor made a decision based on his examination - and that's why you waited. He determined that you did not need an MRI immediately. It sucks, but that's the way a triage-based medical system works - those who need medical assistance immediately get it immediately and those that can wait, wait.

As Regina said, you probably had the opportunity to get an MRI somewhere else as well. Alberta already has a couple of private MRI clinics, where people can jump the queue if they don't want to wait.

http://www.canadadiagnostics.ca/


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:38 am
 


Regina Regina:
DanSC DanSC:
Maybe by Northern Ontario he meant Churchill, not the north end of Toronto.

Churchill is in Manitoba. 8O

According to the 2006 Canadian Census, nearly 25 million people, or more than four-fifths of Canadians live in urban areas. Ninety percent of the Canadian population lives within 100 miles of the U.S. border. This means that the overwhelming majority of the Canadian population is easily reachable through traditional distribution routes.


Why not allow private clinics to open within Canada if that's the case?

Let's make it more accessible for those who want to pay for faster service.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:42 am
 


Regina Regina:
According to the 2006 Canadian Census, nearly 25 million people, or more than four-fifths of Canadians live in urban areas. Ninety percent of the Canadian population lives within 100 miles of the U.S. border. This means that the overwhelming majority of the Canadian population is easily reachable through traditional distribution routes.

Yeah! Screw the 10%! They're not real people!


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:44 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:
Regina Regina:
Churchill is in Manitoba. 8O

According to the 2006 Canadian Census, nearly 25 million people, or more than four-fifths of Canadians live in urban areas. Ninety percent of the Canadian population lives within 100 miles of the U.S. border. This means that the overwhelming majority of the Canadian population is easily reachable through traditional distribution routes.


Why not allow private clinics to open within Canada if that's the case?

Let's make it more accessible for those who want to pay for faster service.


We do allow private clinics in Canada. Any doctor is free to open one. They just can't also work for the government system. If the demand was there for paying for faster service, those clinics would be more common.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:45 am
 


bootlegga bootlegga:
OnTheIce OnTheIce:
I want better wait times.

I have no problem where taxes are today.

A personal experience for you.

After ignoring symptoms for a while, I finally went to the Dr with what most told me was all the signs of MS. Loss of vision. Dizziness, numbness, tremors, the list goes on.

I waited 6 months to get into an MRI for my brain and that's because I was willing to go in at 6:15am.

When you're having a difficult time seeing, when your balance is so off that you're having a hard time walking up and down stairs (keep in mind, I'm only 31) it would be nice to get some treatment and not wait half a year to find out what's wrong.


That sucks, but here's another story for you to consider.

My sister fell and destroyed her knee while shovelling snow here one winter. To determine the extent of the damage and seriousness of the injury, she got an MRI the very next day, and surgery within the week.

I agree that your symptoms probably should have gotten you an MRI sooner, but your doctor made a decision based on his examination - and that's why you waited. He determined that you did not need an MRI immediately. It sucks, but that's the way a triage-based medical system works - those who need medical assistance immediately get it immediately and those that can wait, wait.

As Regina said, you probably had the opportunity to get an MRI somewhere else as well. Alberta already has a couple of private MRI clinics, where people can jump the queue if they don't want to wait.

http://www.canadadiagnostics.ca/


I completely agree that emergency situations are almost always dealt with quickly as was your sister. I had a CT scan the day after my appendix was starting to hurt and surgery within hours.

I did have the opportunity to seek a MRI in another Country, 2 hours from my home. I would like the option you have in Alberta.


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 23, 2011 8:48 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:
Regina Regina:
DanSC DanSC:
Maybe by Northern Ontario he meant Churchill, not the north end of Toronto.

Churchill is in Manitoba. 8O

According to the 2006 Canadian Census, nearly 25 million people, or more than four-fifths of Canadians live in urban areas. Ninety percent of the Canadian population lives within 100 miles of the U.S. border. This means that the overwhelming majority of the Canadian population is easily reachable through traditional distribution routes.


Why not allow private clinics to open within Canada if that's the case?

Let's make it more accessible for those who want to pay for faster service.

Simple. How would you feel if your doctor decided to devote the majority of his practice time to the people that want to pay. How would then feel about waiting 6 months to see your old doctor? Faster accessibility is available right now. Hop in your car drive to Buffalo and experience a well oiled machine that won't affect our care here.


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