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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:40 am
 


Title: Russian media responds to poison attack on former spy with conspiracy theories
Category: World
Posted By: DrCaleb
Date: 2018-03-13 06:37:49


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 6:40 am
 


Notice how all the state run media is avoiding the uncomfortable question 'how did someone get their hands on Russian Military bio weapons?'

Total Nothingburger, Natasha.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:27 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Notice how all the state run media is avoiding the uncomfortable question 'how did someone get their hands on Russian Military bio weapons?'

Total Nothingburger, Natasha.


The military bio weapons are such an obvious signature that if you step back from the fray it looks too obvious.

While Russia certainly has an interest in killing this guy they just don't have anything to gain from it.

But there's a bunch of players who have a lot to gain by using this against Russia and to further a narrative about Russia.

Not that I think Russia is an innocent. Not at all.

But it's not how they operate.

It's not their typical tradecraft. I'd expect something less traceable like prussic acid or something like that.

This (to me) looks like someone wanted this to have a neon sign on it that said 'RUSSIA!'.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:15 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
Notice how all the state run media is avoiding the uncomfortable question 'how did someone get their hands on Russian Military bio weapons?'

Total Nothingburger, Natasha.


The military bio weapons are such an obvious signature that if you step back from the fray it looks too obvious.


From what I've read, the chemicals used are a specific combination of non-toxic chemicals that combined are toxic, and the combination is designed to be hard to identify. Only Russia researched this particular chemical agent.

http://abcnews.go.com/International/nov ... d=53692050

It's not just obvious, it can only be them or their agents.

BartSimpson wrote:
While Russia certainly has an interest in killing this guy they just don't have anything to gain from it.


Intimidation. A bullet in the face doesn't send the same message as "Yes, it was us, but what can you do about it, really?"

BartSimpson wrote:
It's not their typical tradecraft. I'd expect something less traceable like prussic acid or something like that.

This (to me) looks like someone wanted this to have a neon sign on it that said 'RUSSIA!'.


Just like the Pollonium back in 2006. It could only have come from a specific nuclear reactor, given it's chemical signature. And you can't just take a deadly radioactive heavy metal out of a nuclear facility unnoticed.

Same with this chemical weapon. The only conclusions that can be drawn is it either was sanctioned, or unsanctioned. But it definitely was Russia.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:37 am
 


Quote:
The case of a Russian military scientist accidentally exposed to Novichok appears to show that even surviving the effects of the supertoxic nerve agent is horrific.

Andrei Zheleznyakov was said to have been injected with an antidote almost immediately, but a friend said he still went from being a jovial, creative man to suffering “chronic weakness, toxic hepatitis, epilepsy, severe depression and an inability to concentrate,” before dying five years later.

And The Independent has been told that the Salisbury nerve agent attack may have been part of a plan to leave a Mafia-style ‘calling card’ showing anyone, anywhere in the world that if they betrayed or defied Russia they wouldn’t just get a bullet in the back of the head – they would die horribly.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/cr ... 53976.html

So, intimidation it is.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:48 am
 


If you want to know how ridiculous this story is, ask Bart to ask around about a chemical facility in Uzbekistan. You may also want to ask what was invented and produced there, and as to whom took the remaining stock of materials.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:51 am
 


Another dead Russian. Former head of Aeroflot.

In the end, this will be about money.


'Too many deaths of Russian exiles have been happening': Chilling interview by friend of late oligarch Boris Berezovsky is revealed as he is 'found dead at his London home'

A Russian businessman and close friend of Boris Berezovsky has reportedly died
Reports from Russia suggest he was found by his family at his home in London
His friend Boris Berezovsky was also found dead in 2013 in apparent suicide
His death comes a week and a day after former Russian spy was attacked


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z59eGgDN6L


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:53 am
 


martin14 wrote:
In the end, this will be about money.


That is what would fit the bill.

It would also tie up a lot of the loose ends, that don't make sense, if we assume this was state sanctioned.

I personally think this is more internal business "negotiations", Russian style.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:32 am
 


peck420 wrote:
I personally think this is more internal business "negotiations", Russian style.


I would tend to agree.
There is a lot of Russian money stolen from before Putin sitting in London.

But I dont see where Putin gets any advantage for it.. except maybe the coming election.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:36 am
 


martin14 wrote:
But I dont see where Putin gets any advantage for it.. except maybe the coming election.


He doesn't need help there. Anyone who could oppose him has either been disqualified through trumped up charges, or just plain shot.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:46 pm
 


Um, this just got exciting. In a bad way.

The UK is now calling the use of nerve agents in the assassination of the Russian spy a qualifying use of a weapon of mass destruction by Russia against the United Kingdom.

In diplomatic terms this is the UK saying that Russia committed an act of war against the UK.

I haven't heard that the UK is invoking Article Five just yet but I would look for there to be some wartime-level sanctions coming down on Russia within the next few weeks. Like ending diplomatic relations, cutting trade ties, revoking passport privileges, etc.

Shit's getting more and more serious all the time lately. :|


Quote:
On March 4th, Russian defector and former British intelligence source Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia were found slumped over on a bench in the city center of Salisbury, clearly in distress. As first responders quickly discovered, the Skripals had been poisoned with a potentially deadly nerve agent.

But the damage was not limited just to them. Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey, one of the first officers to respond to the scene, also fell ill and was hospitalized after being exposed to the nerve agent. Furthermore, hundreds of local residents in the small Southern English town who came into contact with the Skripals or the restaurant and pub that they had been in that day had to decontaminate their belongings to prevent potential poisonings.

After two weeks of investigation, with the Skripals still in critical condition, the British government now firmly believes that the Kremlin is responsible for the attack. This is due in large part to the findings of investigators who have concluded that the Skripals were poisoned with a Soviet-developed nerve agent known as “Novichok.”

On Monday, Prime Minister Theresa May spoke to the British Parliament to publicly demand an explanation from the Russian government for the poisoning [emphasis mine]:

“It is now clear that Mr. Skripal and his daughter were poisoned with a military grade nerve agent of a type developed by Russia. This is part of a group of nerve agents known as “Novichok.” Based on the positive identification of this chemical agent by world leading experts at the Defense Science and Technology Laboratory at Porton Down, our knowledge that Russia has previously produced this agent and would still be capable of doing so, Russia’s record of conducting state-sponsored assassinations, and our assessment that Russia views some defectors as legitimate targets for assassinations, the government has concluded that it is highly likely that Russia was responsible for the act against Sergei and Yulia Skripal.

“Mr. Speaker, there are therefore only two plausible explanations for what happened in Salisbury on the 4th of March. Either this was a direct act by the Russian state against our country, or the Russian government lost control of its potentially catastrophically damaging nerve agent and allowed it to get into the hands of others.

“This afternoon, my right honorable friend the foreign secretary has summoned the Russian ambassador to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and asked him to explain which of these two possibilities it is, and therefore to account for how this Russian-produced nerve agent could have been deployed in Salisbury against Mr. Skripal and his daughter.

"My right honorable friend has stated to the ambassador that the Russian Federation must immediately provide full and complete disclosure of the Novichok program to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, and he has requested the Russian government’s response by the end of tomorrow.”

May went on to link the attempted assassination of the Skripals with Russia’s aggressive foreign policy under President Putin, including its 2014 annexation of Crimea and subsequent support for rebels in Eastern Ukraine and the 2006 assassination of former FSB agent Alexander Litvinenko in London. Vowing that harsh measures would be imposed on Russia for failing to cooperate with British authorities investigating the poisoning, May closed her remarks by re-iterating the point that her government sees the poisoning as an attack not just against the Skripals, but the United Kingdom as a whole [emphasis mine]:

“On Wednesday, we will consider in detail the response from the Russian state. Should there be no credible response, we will conclude that this action amounts to an unlawful use of force by the Russian state against the United Kingdom. And I will come back to this House and set out the full range of measures that we will take in response. Mr. Speaker, this attempted murder using a weapons-grade nerve agent in a British town was not just a crime against the Skripals. It was an indiscriminate and reckless act against the United Kingdom, putting the lives of innocent civilians at risk, and we will not tolerate such a brazen attempt to murder innocent civilians on our soil.”

On Tuesday, British foreign secretary Boris Johnson confirmed May’s ultimatum and stressed his appreciation for those that have spoken out against Russia in light of the attempted assassination, including now-outgoing U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson:

“What we’re doing today is giving Russia until midnight tonight to explain how it came to be that Novichok was used on the streets of Wiltshire. If they can come up with a convincing explanation, and obviously we will want to see full disclosure of that to the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons in The Hague. If not, then clearly we will want to be announcing the UK response, and that will come tomorrow.

“In the meantime, what we’ve been doing is talking to friends and partners, explaining what we see as the high likelihood of Russian state agency. And I’ve been very encouraged so far by the strength of the support that we are getting, I think in particular from President Macron of France, from -- I just talked to Sigmar Gabriel, my German counterpart, and from Washington, where Rex Tillerson last night made it absolutely clear that he sees this as part of a pattern of disruptive behavior, and increasingly disruptive behavior, malign behavior by Russia.

"The reckless use of chemical weapons -- a support for the reckless use of chemical weapons that stretches from Syria now to the streets of Salisbury. And I’ve been encouraged by the willingness of our friends to show support and solidarity.”

The UK government’s demands for cooperation in their poisoning probe are unlikely to be complied with. The Russian Foreign Ministry denied that Moscow had any involvement in the poisoning and has also demanded that the British government hand over samples of the nerve agent used in the attack to Russia for its own examination.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov has insisted that the accusations from the British government must be evaluated by proper international authorities under the terms of the 1993 Chemical Weapons Convention, which prohibits “the development, production, acquisition, stockpiling, retention, transfer or use of chemical weapons” by signing countries, including Russia.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:52 pm
 


Interesting take on exactly who this Russian spy is:

Quote:
The Russian ex-spy was a close associate of Christopher Steele, and was likely the “source” of the “dossier”. So who’s more likely to put a hit on him? The Russians -after- he was arrested in Russia, imprisoned for treason, served his sentence and was released and living openly under his own name, in the UK for 8 years? OR, the Brennan/Comey intel community/Hillary crew who knows he was the author of the fake dossier and doesn’t want him talking to anyone? (especially since he is a double agent, so the Clinton/Steele crew trusting him to stay loyal is a non-starter)


Maybe the Clintons had this guy killed in such a way that the Russians got blamed for it?

Makes sense because if the Russians wanted the guy dead they could have just killed him instead of letting him go eight years ago. :?:


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:55 pm
 


There are some reports that part of the "reason" for firing Rex Tillerson was because he was hesitant to tell the Brits to back off on accusing Putin of ordering the assassination. If true this means that Trump is actively trying to handcuff any action at all against Russia for any of their activities, which he's already shown himself willing to do by refusing to sign off on the congressionally-approved new sanctions against Russia for their attacks on Ukraine.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 2:08 pm
 


Trump got his orders from Putin.


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2018 3:25 pm
 


Thanos wrote:
There are some reports that part of the "reason" for firing Rex Tillerson was because he was hesitant to tell the Brits to back off on accusing Putin of ordering the assassination. If true this means that Trump is actively trying to handcuff any action at all against Russia for any of their activities, which he's already shown himself willing to do by refusing to sign off on the congressionally-approved new sanctions against Russia for their attacks on Ukraine.



'Don't threaten a nuclear power': Russia's extraordinary warning to Theresa May as her midnight deadline over nerve agent attack on spy looms and Trump says that America is 'with UK all the way'

Theresa May secured the support of Donald Trump for her response to Salisbury
She already had the backing of France and Germany to stand up to Moscow
The Kremlin hit back today with dark warnings not to threaten a nuclear power
Moscow said it would retaliate if May delivers on threatened 'punitive' response


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z59fd3ysvx


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