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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 10:53 am
 


BeaverFever wrote:
In Ontario, the "healthcare premium" isn't really a premium though. It doesn't cover the costs of healthcare, the amount of "premium" charged by it isn't in any way determined by the cost of healthcare, and the revenue isn't even specifically earmarked for healthcare, its just general revenue.

Ten years ago I did a calculation. I looked up how much Manitoba spends on healthcare. Manitoba already has a payroll tax, but no healthcare premium. In 1966 when the national healthcare system was created, Manitoba chose to create a 5% PST instead. At the time it was only charged to manufactured goods, and steel toe work boots were exempt because they were seen as a requirement to get a job. And assurance was funds would only go to healthcare. Now PST goes to general revenue, and the government didn't even try to pretend any of it would go to healthcare. The last PST hike paid for an increase in the Premier's salary, increase provincial cabinet minister salaries, increase MLA salaries, increase salaries of senior bureaucrats including judges, and an exemption for seniors from paying school tax. The school tax thing was really about cottages. A couple from a seniors group went to all provincial parties to do that. The rest of us have difficulty making ends meet with one house, many have an apartment, and these guys don't want to pay taxes on their second house. :evil:

I did a calculation. Rather than get rid of PST, I want to get rid of provincial personal income tax. Adjust the payroll tax to match Ontario's, and dedicate 100% of revenue to healthcare; so that becomes the employer's portion. That would adjust payroll tax a little, some employers would pay a little more, some a little less, but on average it would increase by 4%. That isn't 4% of their payroll, it's 4% of what they pay now. Replace Manitoba personal income tax with a healthcare premium, and make it exactly the same as Ontario's. Again ensure 100% of this goes to healthcare, not to general revenue. This would pay 90% of Manitoba's cost for healthcare, the rest would have to come from general revenue. And that was before the federal 6% annual increases in healthcare funding expired.

If copying Ontario's system gets that close to paying for healthcare, why would it be different in Ontario itself?


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 03, 2017 3:34 pm
 


BeaverFever wrote:
The "average taxpayer" is not under increased strain. Full stop. Current Tax bracket rates are lower, not higher, than in recent decades.


What numbers are you looking at that you've come to a different conclusion than everyone else?

I know you're a big fan of the Liberal agenda, but dude....the "nothing to see here" mantra doesn't work for the Trump nonsense and it doesn't work for your deflection either.

BeaverFever wrote:
The only fat grabbing fingers are those that belong to pro-pollution, anti-regulation "investor class" of executives and major shareholders, who derive all or most of their wealth from investing instead of employment income, and who rely on dupes like you to advance their agenda of turning the rest of society into their serfs


Nonsense.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 7:54 am
 


the Fever is high with Beaver. I have documented many times how my tax bill is increasing yearly but according to him, it is flat or decreasing. He does math differently than the rest of the known universe. Plus he doesn't like to talk about things like property tax likely because he is living in his mothers basement so he doesn't care about taxes like that. So telling him my property tax bill has more than doubled in less than a decade does not computed in his fever induced cranium.

Then he refuses to address all the additional taxes, he thinks it stops at Fed and Provincial income tax. He fails to look at his wonderful life saving carbon tax, or gas tax or PST's etc etc. In his world taxes are going down when clearly as I have demonstrated time and time again, they are not.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 8:32 am
 


uwish wrote:
the Fever is high with Beaver. I have documented many times how my tax bill is increasing yearly but according to him, it is flat or decreasing. He does math differently than the rest of the known universe. Plus he doesn't like to talk about things like property tax likely because he is living in his mothers basement so he doesn't care about taxes like that. So telling him my property tax bill has more than doubled in less than a decade does not computed in his fever induced cranium.

Then he refuses to address all the additional taxes, he thinks it stops at Fed and Provincial income tax. He fails to look at his wonderful life saving carbon tax, or gas tax or PST's etc etc. In his world taxes are going down when clearly as I have demonstrated time and time again, they are not.



would +5 if I could.

Just remember, according to him you are rich rich rich, so you can / should / obliged /
we will force you to pay more.. more and more.. and then some more.

Gotta pay for those programs, and he won't be paying for them. :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 9:10 am
 


In 1998, a taxpayer paid 17% federal tax on any income up to $29,590, 26% on income between that and $59,180 and 29% on anything above that, which was the top marginal rate.

Today the bottom tax bracket is 15% and covers income up to $45,916. The next bracket is 20.5% and covers all the way up to almost $92k. ONLY THEN it goes up to the 26% for incomes between $92k and $142k, which you'll note that was the tax rate previously charged to people making as little as $30k.

Above $142k and below $203k you have 29% tax rate, the rate that previously applied to anyone making more than $59k. People in this income band are paying the same rate as before but already we're talking about the wealthiest 5% of society here, not "average Canadians". Above $203k taxes are 4% higher than historical but already we're talking about the wealthiest 2%.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Income_taxes_in_Canada

Of course the recent NDP government in Alberta may indicate a reversal of the tax cut trend, and depending on ones interpretation, recent things like CPP enhancement carbon tax schemes, may be indicators as well. However these are all very recent events not indicative of the overall historical trend.

Median after tax income actually trends upward because it also includes income transferred back from the government, such as CPP, EI payments, child tax benefit, etc.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 9:53 am
 


BeaverFever wrote:
In 1998, a taxpayer paid 17% federal tax on any income up to $29,590, 26% on income between that and $59,180 and 29% on anything above that, which was the top marginal rate.

Today the bottom tax bracket is 15% and covers income up to $45,916. The next bracket is 20.5% and covers all the way up to almost $92k. ONLY THEN it goes up to the 26% for incomes between $92k and $142k, which you'll note that was the tax rate previously charged to people making as little as $30k.

Above $142k and below $203k you have 29% tax rate, the rate that previously applied to anyone making more than $59k. People in this income band are paying the same rate as before but already we're talking about the wealthiest 5% of society here, not "average Canadians". Above $203k taxes are 4% higher than historical but already we're talking about the wealthiest 2%.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Income_taxes_in_Canada

Of course the recent NDP government in Alberta may indicate a reversal of the tax cut trend, and depending on ones interpretation, recent things like CPP enhancement carbon tax schemes, may be indicators as well. However these are all very recent events not indicative of the overall historical trend.

Median after tax income actually trends upward because it also includes income transferred back from the government, such as CPP, EI payments, child tax benefit, etc.



You are aware there are far more taxes than income, right?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 10:03 am
 


martin14 wrote:
uwish wrote:
the Fever is high with Beaver. I have documented many times how my tax bill is increasing yearly but according to him, it is flat or decreasing. He does math differently than the rest of the known universe. Plus he doesn't like to talk about things like property tax likely because he is living in his mothers basement so he doesn't care about taxes like that. So telling him my property tax bill has more than doubled in less than a decade does not computed in his fever induced cranium.

Then he refuses to address all the additional taxes, he thinks it stops at Fed and Provincial income tax. He fails to look at his wonderful life saving carbon tax, or gas tax or PST's etc etc. In his world taxes are going down when clearly as I have demonstrated time and time again, they are not.



would +5 if I could.



I just did. [B-o]


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 11:41 am
 


uwish wrote:
the Fever is high with Beaver. I have documented many times how my tax bill is increasing yearly but according to him, it is flat or decreasing. He does math differently than the rest of the known universe. Plus he doesn't like to talk about things like property tax likely because he is living in his mothers basement so he doesn't care about taxes like that. So telling him my property tax bill has more than doubled in less than a decade does not computed in his fever induced cranium.

Then he refuses to address all the additional taxes, he thinks it stops at Fed and Provincial income tax. He fails to look at his wonderful life saving carbon tax, or gas tax or PST's etc etc. In his world taxes are going down when clearly as I have demonstrated time and time again, they are not.



Well now who has the hostile tone now? When you don't have the facts for the argument you resort to personal attacks. Sign of a sore loser.

And we've already established that you're in the wealthiest 2% of society so you're not the typical middle class Canadian, haven't we? Let me go get a violin to play over your outrageous 4% income tax increase. What more can we lowly middle class serfs do to make you more comfortable?

Secondly property tax varies from one municipality to another so I can't comment specifically but in theory I would agree it generally goes up over time. It's also unique because it's not a tax on income or consumption but a tax on wealth - assets you have, not simply the assets you acquire or spend. I own two properties, a house and a cottage so I'm well aware, although the rates for neither property has increased for me personally since I acquired them.

The GST has gone down two percentage points since inception.

Federal excise taxes on fuel, which only apply to gasoline and diesel have not increased since their inception in 1995 and 1987, respectively. The provincial fuel tax in Ontario hasn't changed since 1992. I haven't looked it up province by province but with the exception of Alberta and possibly other very recent events I expect it's largely the same story.

Carbon taxes and Albertas new NDP tax regime are very new as addressed above and in my earlier post.

But the biggest point that you're missing here when it comes to property taxes, sales taxes and wondering why I focus on income tax is that by definition its almost impossible to spend more on tax than purchases without including income tax. For example the sales tax you pay on a car is not more than the price of the car, it's a small percentage of the price of the car. Income tax is the majority of the tax you pay. And the amount of sales tax or property tax you pay depends on your personal spending habits. Someone who doesn't save any money and has a large house and expensive spending habits pays more tax than if they saved more and lived more modestly so factoring those taxes into the calculation can be problematic


But it would seem that:

Quote:

Overall, the average Canadian’s benefit from all public services in Canada was $16,592 in 2009. Over half of this (56%) comes from expenditures on health care, education, and income transfers. Indeed, more than two- thirds of Canadians receive a benefit from public services that is greater than 50% of their average incomes.9

...In 2006, median income households received $41,000 worth of public services, an amount equivalent to about 63% of their total income.11

... Even those living in households in the $80,000 to $90,000 range — just below the richest 20% — received benefits from public services equivalent to about half of their total household income.12

https://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsr ... ians-study


Quote:
31%

That’s how much of Canada’s economy is made up of income, sales, corporate, property and other taxes we pay to all levels of government. (Source)

$38 billion

That’s how much less Canadians now pay in individual income tax compared to 2000. (Source)

$19 billion

That’s how much less Canadians pay now in sales taxes compared to 2000. Since the Harper government cut the GST by two points in 2007, the average annual revenue loss to the treasury is about $12 billion. (Source 1, 2)

$18 billion

That’s how much less corporations pay now in Canadian taxes compared to 2000. (Source)


https://www.policyalternatives.ca/publi ... xing-times

Source links are the Vancouver Sun but links are now dead, I'll try to find later.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 11:43 am
 


martin14 wrote:
uwish wrote:
the Fever is high with Beaver. I have documented many times how my tax bill is increasing yearly but according to him, it is flat or decreasing. He does math differently than the rest of the known universe. Plus he doesn't like to talk about things like property tax likely because he is living in his mothers basement so he doesn't care about taxes like that. So telling him my property tax bill has more than doubled in less than a decade does not computed in his fever induced cranium.

Then he refuses to address all the additional taxes, he thinks it stops at Fed and Provincial income tax. He fails to look at his wonderful life saving carbon tax, or gas tax or PST's etc etc. In his world taxes are going down when clearly as I have demonstrated time and time again, they are not.



would +5 if I could.

Just remember, according to him you are rich rich rich, so you can / should / obliged /
we will force you to pay more.. more and more.. and then some more.

Gotta pay for those programs, and he won't be paying for them. :lol:



I probably pay a lot more tax than you. I wouldn't get worked up if my taxes went up either.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 12:04 pm
 


BeaverFever wrote:

Secondly property tax varies from one municipality to another so I can't comment specifically but in theory I would agree it generally goes up over time.


Not "generally". Property taxes always go up over time.

BeaverFever wrote:
It's also unique because it's not a tax on income or consumption but a tax on wealth - assets you have, not simply the assets you acquire or spend.


Wrong.

You're forgetting about renters. When property taxes increase, everyone pays. Tenants included.

BeaverFever wrote:
Income tax is the majority of the tax you pay. And the amount of sales tax or property tax you pay depends on your personal spending habits. Someone who doesn't save any money and has a large house and expensive spending habits pays more tax than if they saved more and lived more modestly so factoring those taxes into the calculation can be problematic
Quote:

That's false too. Income taxes account for 13% while the remainder of taxes accounts for 29%.

As per the OP:

Quote:
In 2015, the average Canadian family earned an income of $80,593 and paid total taxes equaling $34,154 (42.4%).

In 1961, the average family had an income of $5,000 and paid a total tax bill of $1,675 (33.5%).


Last edited by Coach85 on Tue Sep 05, 2017 12:36 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 12:20 pm
 


martin14 wrote:
uwish wrote:
the Fever is high with Beaver.

Just remember, according to him you are rich rich rich, so you can / should / obliged /
we will force you to pay more.. more and more.. and then some more.

Gotta pay for those programs, and he won't be paying for them. :lol:


BeaverFever wrote:
Sign of a sore loser.
And we've already established that you're in the wealthiest 2% of society so you're not the typical middle class Canadian, haven't we? Let me go get a violin to play over your outrageous 4% income tax increase. What more can we lowly middle class serfs do to make you more comfortable?



Well thank you for validating my post.

Always good to know I was right. :lol: :lol:


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 12:57 pm
 


BeaverFever wrote:
uwish wrote:
the Fever is high with Beaver. I have documented many times how my tax bill is increasing yearly but according to him, it is flat or decreasing. He does math differently than the rest of the known universe. Plus he doesn't like to talk about things like property tax likely because he is living in his mothers basement so he doesn't care about taxes like that. So telling him my property tax bill has more than doubled in less than a decade does not computed in his fever induced cranium.

Then he refuses to address all the additional taxes, he thinks it stops at Fed and Provincial income tax. He fails to look at his wonderful life saving carbon tax, or gas tax or PST's etc etc. In his world taxes are going down when clearly as I have demonstrated time and time again, they are not.



Well now who has the hostile tone now? When you don't have the facts for the argument you resort to personal attacks. Sign of a sore loser.

And we've already established that you're in the wealthiest 2% of society so you're not the typical middle class Canadian, haven't we? Let me go get a violin to play over your outrageous 4% income tax increase. What more can we lowly middle class serfs do to make you more comfortable?

Secondly property tax varies from one municipality to another so I can't comment specifically but in theory I would agree it generally goes up over time. It's also unique because it's not a tax on income or consumption but a tax on wealth - assets you have, not simply the assets you acquire or spend. I own two properties, a house and a cottage so I'm well aware, although the rates for neither property has increased for me personally since I acquired them.

The GST has gone down two percentage points since inception.

Federal excise taxes on fuel, which only apply to gasoline and diesel have not increased since their inception in 1995 and 1987, respectively. The provincial fuel tax in Ontario hasn't changed since 1992. I haven't looked it up province by province but with the exception of Alberta and possibly other very recent events I expect it's largely the same story.

Carbon taxes and Albertas new NDP tax regime are very new as addressed above and in my earlier post.

But the biggest point that you're missing here when it comes to property taxes, sales taxes and wondering why I focus on income tax is that by definition its almost impossible to spend more on tax than purchases without including income tax. For example the sales tax you pay on a car is not more than the price of the car, it's a small percentage of the price of the car. Income tax is the majority of the tax you pay. And the amount of sales tax or property tax you pay depends on your personal spending habits. Someone who doesn't save any money and has a large house and expensive spending habits pays more tax than if they saved more and lived more modestly so factoring those taxes into the calculation can be problematic



Personal attack? I have no idea what you even look like, please quote where my attack was personal? I clearly outlined what you always choose to leave out of your little tax discussion. And yes, I do agree that is isn't easy to go through every province because their tax structures are slightly different. But, one of the reasons I chose Alberta is because it is the LOWEST tax jurisdiction in the country, not just the fact I live here, that doesn't change the fact that the average Albertan's Provincial income tax increase by >7%

2016 Alberta property tax increased almost 30% this year over previous years, but again you don't like to talk about that.

And yes, federal tax rates did increase overall for me, they dropped in one portion then rose almost twice as much in another. The net is an increase in tax.

You can say you don't feel sorry for me and I am not asking you to, but you don't work for a poor person do you? There is an overwhelming high degree of certainty that you work for someone who you would consider 'wealthier' than you are. So this poor 4% increase in personal income tax (not including the increases in other tax rates outlined) means less money to hire people like you (if I was a small business for example).

It's that attitude that drives investment away by outwardly penalizing those who are more financially successful than say you. I don't make my money from investments at least not any significant amount, I am a salaried employee. If you live in Ont then your property tax has gone up, and to claim it hasn't is BS and I am calling you out on it. Unless you only bought them within the past 2 years, it has gone up every year since at least 2008.

https://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/cont ... d60f89RCRD

Now that is just the city portion, the provincial portion on average is higher. So to claim they have not gone up is a complete falsehood unless you have only owned them for a year!

I pay 2.5 times the tax as you and I sure don't use 2.5 x the services do I? how can I as only one person.

Arguing again that 'federal tax' on fuel hasn't changed is another omission, I don't care if the federal excise tax hasn't changed, my provincial one sure has! and not in the way you claim (down). So you can sit there and say taxes have not increased, but they have. I find it quite comical that you sit in Ont, that has one of the highest, and regressive tax systems in Canada (other than the east)and you claim your taxes have not gone up. Either you make less than the basic exemption amount (which is entirely within the realm of possibilities here) or you are completely incompetent (also not out of the realm of possibilities).


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 1:17 pm
 


uwish wrote:
BeaverFever wrote:
uwish wrote:
the Fever is high with Beaver. I have documented many times how my tax bill is increasing yearly but according to him, it is flat or decreasing. He does math differently than the rest of the known universe. Plus he doesn't like to talk about things like property tax likely because he is living in his mothers basement so he doesn't care about taxes like that. So telling him my property tax bill has more than doubled in less than a decade does not computed in his fever induced cranium.

Then he refuses to address all the additional taxes, he thinks it stops at Fed and Provincial income tax. He fails to look at his wonderful life saving carbon tax, or gas tax or PST's etc etc. In his world taxes are going down when clearly as I have demonstrated time and time again, they are not.



Well now who has the hostile tone now? When you don't have the facts for the argument you resort to personal attacks. Sign of a sore loser.

And we've already established that you're in the wealthiest 2% of society so you're not the typical middle class Canadian, haven't we? Let me go get a violin to play over your outrageous 4% income tax increase. What more can we lowly middle class serfs do to make you more comfortable?

Secondly property tax varies from one municipality to another so I can't comment specifically but in theory I would agree it generally goes up over time. It's also unique because it's not a tax on income or consumption but a tax on wealth - assets you have, not simply the assets you acquire or spend. I own two properties, a house and a cottage so I'm well aware, although the rates for neither property has increased for me personally since I acquired them.

The GST has gone down two percentage points since inception.

Federal excise taxes on fuel, which only apply to gasoline and diesel have not increased since their inception in 1995 and 1987, respectively. The provincial fuel tax in Ontario hasn't changed since 1992. I haven't looked it up province by province but with the exception of Alberta and possibly other very recent events I expect it's largely the same story.

Carbon taxes and Albertas new NDP tax regime are very new as addressed above and in my earlier post.

But the biggest point that you're missing here when it comes to property taxes, sales taxes and wondering why I focus on income tax is that by definition its almost impossible to spend more on tax than purchases without including income tax. For example the sales tax you pay on a car is not more than the price of the car, it's a small percentage of the price of the car. Income tax is the majority of the tax you pay. And the amount of sales tax or property tax you pay depends on your personal spending habits. Someone who doesn't save any money and has a large house and expensive spending habits pays more tax than if they saved more and lived more modestly so factoring those taxes into the calculation can be problematic



Personal attack? I have no idea what you even look like, please quote where my attack was personal? I clearly outlined what you always choose to leave out of your little tax discussion. And yes, I do agree that is isn't easy to go through every province because their tax structures are slightly different. But, one of the reasons I chose Alberta is because it is the LOWEST tax jurisdiction in the country, not just the fact I live here, that doesn't change the fact that the average Albertan's Provincial income tax increase by >7%

2016 Alberta property tax increased almost 30% this year over previous years, but again you don't like to talk about that.

And yes, federal tax rates did increase overall for me, they dropped in one portion then rose almost twice as much in another. The net is an increase in tax.

You can say you don't feel sorry for me and I am not asking you to, but you don't work for a poor person do you? There is an overwhelming high degree of certainty that you work for someone who you would consider 'wealthier' than you are. So this poor 4% increase in personal income tax (not including the increases in other tax rates outlined) means less money to hire people like you (if I was a small business for example).

It's that attitude that drives investment away by outwardly penalizing those who are more financially successful than say you. I don't make my money from investments at least not any significant amount, I am a salaried employee. If you live in Ont then your property tax has gone up, and to claim it hasn't is BS and I am calling you out on it. Unless you only bought them within the past 2 years, it has gone up every year since at least 2008.

https://www1.toronto.ca/wps/portal/cont ... d60f89RCRD

Now that is just the city portion, the provincial portion on average is higher. So to claim they have not gone up is a complete falsehood unless you have only owned them for a year!

I pay 2.5 times the tax as you and I sure don't use 2.5 x the services do I? how can I as only one person.

Arguing again that 'federal tax' on fuel hasn't changed is another omission, I don't care if the federal excise tax hasn't changed, my provincial one sure has! and not in the way you claim (down). So you can sit there and say taxes have not increased, but they have. I find it quite comical that you sit in Ont, that has one of the highest, and regressive tax systems in Canada (other than the east)and you claim your taxes have not gone up. Either you make less than the basic exemption amount (which is entirely within the realm of possibilities here) or you are completely incompetent (also not out of the realm of possibilities).


+5 R=UP You have been knocking it out of the park lately! Keep it up!


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 1:24 pm
 


Coach85 wrote:
BeaverFever wrote:

Secondly property tax varies from one municipality to another so I can't comment specifically but in theory I would agree it generally goes up over time.


Not "generally". Property taxes always go up over time.

Oh give me a break! Ok I know you're super eager totty and correct me on something - anything! - but this is just ridiculous nit-picking over word choice. Generally speaking, property tax rates go up over time. You're only trying to restate my same point with more absolute terms to "correct" me but do you have authoritative knowledge on every historical property tax rate ever assessed? No? So the best way to state the point is how I worded it.

Quote:
BeaverFever wrote:
It's also unique because it's not a tax on income or consumption but a tax on wealth - assets you have, not simply the assets you acquire or spend.


Wrong.

You're forgetting about renters. When property taxes increase, everyone pays. Tenants included.


Again with the desperate pointless correction attempts. Yes we are all interconnected the costs if everything are indirectly paid for by everyone else. I might have been a customer of the company you work for, therefore I pay your salary. I mean I can't even tell what larger point you're trying to make here but you clearly missed mine. To he clear:

Renters are not assessed property taxes. Taxes are asssed against the owner of the property and based on the assessed value of the property, not how much money the property earned or how much it spent. Of course the costs of owning the property would be passed on to a renter if that property were rented but that's completely beside the point.

Quote:
BeaverFever wrote:
Income tax is the majority of the tax you pay. And the amount of sales tax or property tax you pay depends on your personal spending habits. Someone who doesn't save any money and has a large house and expensive spending habits pays more tax than if they saved more and lived more modestly so factoring those taxes into the calculation can be problematic


That's false too. Income taxes account for 13% while the remainder of taxes accounts for 29%.

As per the OP:

Quote:
In 2015, the average Canadian family earned an income of $80,593 and paid total taxes equaling $34,154 (42.4%).

In 1961, the average family had an income of $5,000 and paid a total tax bill of $1,675 (33.5%).


I don't follow your math or how it relates to your quote but as per the original rebuttal the OP is flawed for a number of reasons, particularly adding corporate taxes paid by businesses onto their calculations of the household tax bill as if they were paid by families. Note that corporate profits aren't added onto the family income so it's an artificial method meant to overstate the family's tax burden. Also as per the original rebuttal, note that 1961 was the final year in which there was no CPP or medicare so of course they choose that year as the baseline but it's dishonest to shriek that taxes are just going up since then without discussing the enormous benefit and transformation of society that occurred since then. Seniors living in poverty was a major societal problem largely eliminated by the introduction of CPP. I mean Saskatchewan didn't even complete rural electrification until 1966! But my taxes! You can't trade in your Ford Focus for a Ferrari and then use the priice difference to scream that the cost of car ownership is going up. Fraser Institute is dishonest and overtly partisan.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 05, 2017 2:03 pm
 


BeaverFever wrote:
Oh give me a break! Ok I know you're super eager totty and correct me on something - anything! - but this is just ridiculous nit-picking over word choice. Generally speaking, property tax rates go up over time. You're only trying to restate my same point with more absolute terms to "correct" me but do you have authoritative knowledge on every historical property tax rate ever assessed? No? So the best way to state the point is how I worded it.


You followed with your comment that your property taxes, in Ontario, haven't gone up since you've acquired them. Unless you bought your properties over the last year, you're likely being a tad dishonest to us and looking to pass off the major increases by others as inconsequential.


BeaverFever wrote:
Again with the desperate pointless correction attempts. Yes we are all interconnected the costs if everything are indirectly paid for by everyone else. I might have been a customer of the company you work for, therefore I pay your salary. I mean I can't even tell what larger point you're trying to make here but you clearly missed mine.


The larger point is to highlight the things you're trying to downplay. Things like property taxes and how they affect people. Cherry picking one particular item to try to discredit a report that takes into account multiple factors beyond the one you cherry picked is typical 'liberal math'.

You, Kathleen and Charles Sousa must have attended the same math class.

BeaverFever wrote:
Fraser Institute is dishonest and overtly partisan.


While you may not be dishonest, you're overtly partisan yourself. So, to see you disagree against a right-wing establishment isn't a surprise to anyone here.


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