CKA Forums
Login 
canadian forums
bottom
 
 
Canadian Forums

Author Topic Options
Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 13911

Warnings: (40%)
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 1:26 pm
 


It never ceases to amaze me how resilient the 'self-hating Canadian' phenomenon can be. And yes, if you hate the Canadian Football League, you are most likely a Canadian as most football fans south of the border are either indifferent or appreciative of our uniquely Canadian game. Further, you are most likely from Ontario as western Canadians tend to have strong support for our league. Only in this province can one expect to encounter ridicule and open hostility when ever the world's oldest professional sports league is mentioned.

The official reason for this contempt centres around the supposed 'logic' that since NFL salaries are significantly higher, CFL players are unskilled and unworthy of attention. While I will address the flaws of this logic later, it is interesting to note that most of these critics will still happily watch Junior hockey and NCAA sports without any concern that these players are less skilled than their professional counterparts.

I get it...because the CFL is an exclusively Canadian League, it doesn't register on the American radar and therefore doesn't get mention in our pop culture, which is almost entirely American-made. There are no Hollywood celebrities at our games and our players do not get cameos in the latest pop music videos on MTV. America has no reason to give the CFL any recognition and therefore, some wrongly assume that the CFL must "suck" as they require validation from the United States and their favourite celebs.

But let's get back to those American fans of the CFL. Forget what you hear about baseball, in the US, football is the real national sport that is followed and loved the way hockey is here in Canada. In most US communities, there are competitive contact football leagues starting as young as age 6 and many public schools have extensively funded football programs complete with full stadium seating and dedicated team buses. Most Americans have a far deeper understanding and relationship with the sport and while many naturally enjoy the NFL, those who have seen the CFL praise the unique quality of the Canadian game, with its wide-open plays, faster pace, more unpredictable outcomes and breath-taking passing action. When the NFL network began airing CFL games this season, the network website's message board was filled with Americans praising the Canadian league and the fact that they had found an exciting new "summer league" to watch. Some even commented that the NFL was "too commercial" and they had long preferred the "real" football played north of the border.

Another point celebrated by the American fans was the fact the CFL gave them opportunity to see some of their favourite College players from past years. Far from "sucking", half of the CFL's players, and most of their skilled players, are imports from the American football system. Many of those US imports have considerable honours such as Heisman Trophies and various other NCAA/Big Ten awards, such as MVP, league leader, etc. Many CFL players started their pro careers as top-round NFL draft picks and many continue to move back and forth between the NFL and CFL teams, looking for their chance to land that multimillion dollar NFL contract. So clearly the level of skill is high enough for many to contend for the "big time" league and certainly not deserving of derision from some Canadian who has probably never played full contact football in his life.

But there's more to the skill and talent debate than the claim that CFL players are "almost as good as" NFL players. In fact, the Canadian and US scouts do not always seek the same attributes for a particular position. The games are different enough that a player can be successful in one league but not the other. This had been difficult to prove in the past, but Ricky Williams' recent foray into the CFL gives us clear evidence of this fact. Williams was a rising star in the NFL and was suspended for 2 years due to marijuana use, even though he was a strong performer as Running Back for the Miami Dolphins. During his suspension, he came north to play for the Toronto Argonauts. Speculation was rife that Williams would "own" the CFL and be unstoppable, but Williams was unable to adapt to the Canadian style of play and his time in the CFL was relatively unremarkable, except that he broke is arm in a game against the Saskatchewan Roughriders. Despite being a fast runner, Ricky's problem in the Canadian game was that he could not outmaneuver the defenders covering him. Ricky returned to the NFL and the Dolphins after 1 season in Canada and is once again a big success in the NFL where his skills are useful.

In the CFL, agility - the ability to rapidly change direction and run left-right as well as forward- is crucial for success on the larger and more square field the more "wide open" plays run on a field of such proportions. The NFL's smaller, more crowded field emphasizes player size, power and "North-south" running. The ability to knock down a defender and break a tackle is more important in the NFL, while the ability to evade defenders and find open field is more important in the CFL. With only 3 downs and 110 yards, crushing up the middle for 3 or 4 yards is not valued as much being able to get open and make the 1st down. The bottom line, if you have hands made out of glue and can run like the wind, it does not mean you are 'untalented' if you are also 5'10 and 180 pounds and too small for the NFL style of play. CFL players are more likely to come from this set: smaller, highly mobile, with a tendency to emphasize physical endurance instead of explosive power. Williams did not fit this mold and could not develop the skills necessary to overcome the CFL defenders who did.

The Williams experience also tells us something else about CFL. Williams himself noted in an interview that talent in the CFL and NFL is "pretty comparable" at most positions, considering the differences in the skill sets described above. Williams also praised the fact that CFL players are "all around players" while NFL teams, with much larger rosters, have more highly specialized players. As Williams told USA Today, "(In Canada), I can play offense, defense, special teams. I can do everything. I can block, play tight end, running back, receiver — even play the line. The NFL is so structured — 'You do this.' Here I can do so much." As one example of Williams' point, NFL teams have one kicker for place-kicks and another kicker for punts; in the CFL, there is generally one kicker for both and players such as Williams are expected to not only run the ball, but have more developed blocking, passing and receiving skills as well. NFL teams are more likely to have multiple players at the same position, each with a unique specialized skill set, which they alternate depending on the skills wanted for a particular play. Even though most CFL players surely dream of the salaries and fame that come with the NFL, most who have played in both leagues openly admit that the Canadian game is more enjoyable to play and to watch.

The CFL has also long been a have for Black Quarterbacks, which are still a rarity and source of controversy in the NFL. While there may be many reasons for so few Black NFL QBs (for example, a lack of need to scout Black colleges) it remains true that highly talented Black QBs have long had success north of the border. Until the recent departure of Casey Printers in BC all but two of the starting CFL QBs were Black. Compare that to the NFL, where only 14 of 87 QBs in the league are Black, only 5 of whom are actually starters. Though this is a very small ratio, it has actually provoked conversation of a "black explosion" at the QB position because in previous years, the number was even smaller.

So in conclusion, I've found that most CFL-haters don't know much about football generally and usually are better describes as sports betters rather than sports fans, since their biggest concerns in odds and point spreads. Most CFL-haters can't even explain why they root for one NFL team over another; usually its whatever team was winning when the first took interest in the sport. CFL-haters should really give an honest, open attempt to understand the Canadian league and enjoy a game that is far more entertaining than the product south of the border.


Offline
CKA Super Elite
CKA Super Elite
 Edmonton Oilers
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 5242
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 1:33 pm
 


Also, the gov't should make the day after Grey Cup a stat holiday.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 11400
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 4:28 am
 


I'm not a "Football" fan, although I enjoyed playing it(Touch and Tackle)as a kid with some friends. The NFL certainly has the more talented Players, but the CFL has the better Rules and Game overall IMO. The CFL requires Teams to take more risk and make better Plays in order to succeed.


Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
Profile
Posts: 32562
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:16 am
 


Don't think I've ever heard anyone say they "hate" the CFL. They are slightly different games but the hype and pizzazz around an NFL game is certainly higher, so if you include all that it may seem like a better game. The CFL game is more mobile because of the field size and they have to make more happen with less downs, which I think leads to more action. The last two minute of a NFL game is like watching paint dry and it will go on forever. CFL lineman need to have more lateral mobility and are usually a bit lighter than their NFL counterpart. I was on the sidelines when the Dexter Manley played in the CFL and he looked a bit out of place. This was at the end of his career but he was by no means washed up. I would give the NFL a slight leg up as far as receivers go. Not that they are faster or turn sharper but they probably catch the ball with a slightly higher percentage. All in all though, if you're sitting on the couch watching the CFL game is more entertaining and not so drawn out.


Offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 9953
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:42 am
 


The CFL is a way better game than the NFL. I haven't forced myself to watch an NFL game in years, I don't enjoy them, so whats the point.

I don't think too many people hate the CFL, but many are caught up in the hype and glitz of the NFL. It is splashed across our own media more than our own game is and that is sad. (But then again our "Sports" channels broadcast poker on them more than any Canadian sports, so that says it all about that... :roll: )

I'd watch CFL pre-season over the Super Bowl any day of the week.

The CFL needs a few more teams, and not south of the border. Put one in the maritimes and maybe one around the lake head somewhere. Maybe one in Grande Prairie, they could call them the Storm too.... :lol: :twisted:


Offline
Forum Super Elite
Forum Super Elite
 Toronto Maple Leafs
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 2403
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:54 am
 


Well I never met anyone who has stated they hate the CFL. Plus you won't find more rabid (literally) CFL fans than Hamiltardians. So you assertion that CFL haters must be from Ontario is garbage. The NFL does a waaaay better job selling their game at home and abroad than the CFL does at hoime. Some days I think the CFL is happy to just rely on the group of hard core fans and hope they can passively convince fence sitters to come to a game every now and then. Granted the NFL doesn't care if the publicity that their sport garners is good or bad, as long as people are talking about the NFL. I'm not saying the CFL should be trying to convince the teams to sign convicted felons or signing players banned in the U.S. just so they can make page 3 of the National Post, but the CFL does need something to raise it's profile. I think back to the days when the Argos had John Candy and Wayne Gretzky as owners (Bruce McNall as well but he wasn't THAT big a deal) and were able to torpedo the NFL by signing "Rocket" Ismail (sp?). The game might not have really been better but boy was everyone talking about, and excited about, the Argos. I'm sure that buzz was carried to whatever city they went to. You just don't see that these days. For the CFL the product is not just the game itself but the people that play it. While the people today may resonate in the individual cities they play in they don't exactly draw people in other CFL cities (you can't say the same about Michael Vick or Brett Favre).


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Toronto Maple Leafs
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 14114

Warnings: (20%)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 12:01 pm
 


I'm not a major football fan but I'll watch a CFL game LONG before I watch an NFL game. I actually hate the NFL. Wussy touchbacks, ball nicely line-up with the goal posts for field goals, and what the FUCK is with the last 2 minutes of an NFL game? It should not take as long as the friggin entire quarter. They should be forced to play the ball, not just sit on it cuz they have the lead.
Hell, I've seen 3 TDs scored in the final 2 minutes of a CFL game. Now THAT'S exciting!


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 20829
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 12:09 pm
 


I prefer the CFL game, but as several people have said, I think it's the glitz/glamour of the NFL that draws many Canadian fans. Personally, I find it hard to cheer for a team I will never see play a live game. I don't agree that Ontarians are CFL haters, just a vocal minority in Toronto, who desperately want the CFL to die so they can have an NFL team.

I think the best game would be CFL rules with NFL players, but the CFL game is already pretty good anyways.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
Profile
Posts: 12434
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 12:47 pm
 


Football is all about gambling. CFL = 8 teams = 4 games per week to bet on. NFL = 30 teams = 15 games to bet on. Plus, the NFL has a non-stop media barrage of prognosticators to aid gamblers in their obsession. The NFL is a mesmerizing flash of glitz and bells and whistles, just like a casino room. Look out, Flintstone, you're in their sights:



Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 20991
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 2:57 pm
 


I tell you why I hate it. It's because of whatt he "F" stands for. Football. Maybe ten times a game a guy'll come out and kick the ball. The rest is all carrying the ball in your arms and throwing it.

Now the game they call soccer in North America is called football just about everywhere else. Why? Becasue they actually use their feet and a ball to play the game...thus "football." Anyways, the soccer league in my neighbourhood recently renamed itself the "North Shore Football Club" much tothe dismay of many American/Canadian footbal fans. Good on 'em I say. Get a new name that actually reflects what's happening. Gridiron? Pigskin? :lol:


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 11400
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 5:30 pm
 


Zipperfish wrote:
I tell you why I hate it. It's because of whatt he "F" stands for. Football. Maybe ten times a game a guy'll come out and kick the ball. The rest is all carrying the ball in your arms and throwing it.

Now the game they call soccer in North America is called football just about everywhere else. Why? Becasue they actually use their feet and a ball to play the game...thus "football." Anyways, the soccer league in my neighbourhood recently renamed itself the "North Shore Football Club" much tothe dismay of many American/Canadian footbal fans. Good on 'em I say. Get a new name that actually reflects what's happening. Gridiron? Pigskin? :lol:


lol, ya. This is why I "" the word these days. It makes no sense to call it that.


Offline
Forum Addict
Forum Addict
 Calgary Flames
Profile
Posts: 956
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:11 pm
 


I've personally drawn the light the CFL draws in comparison to the NFL to be much the same how rugby or European Football is portrayed in American media. As in, it isn't. Much like hockey doesn't receive the attention it is due south of the border, I feel Football doesn't get a lot of the attention it could get from north of the border, either. It's simply a case of national pride -- when you have a nation which gambles, buys a ton of football goods, watches a ton of games, and has school systems from the elementary to post-secondary which revolve in part around the game, you are going to end up expecting it to be a far bigger deal and make other leagues pale in comparison, just because of the mammoth, monumental income and sheer business machine it is south of there. If the CFL could draw in billions of dollars over the few hours one game plays, I'm sure that the CFL would get more attention, but because Canadians view the NHL has more of our national game, it's going to end up playing a back seat role.

Just like American Football, Hockey, and Basketball play a back seat role in Europe, and, ironically, that is one of the complaints I frequently here from fans of those sports in those nations, that people simply don't get into them as much as the Canadians or Americans do and end up just watching European Football, or Rugby, or Cricket instead. If people were as hell bent on table tennis in Africa as they were in East Asia, I'm sure we'd see it becoming a lot more important down in Africa too.

If it's considered more of a regional or national sport, then the merchandising, player movement, and attractiveness of the sport will go up. The more it's considered a national past time or of personal import the more time people put into it, and there's incentives for the people in those nations to respond to that. With the ruckus that is caused down in the States about the game, people simply end up assuming that it's going to be better because more energy is put into it and more people go to the games down there. More people play the sport as well, and it's very much trumped up in the public opinion of folks. People want to be carried away by the pride which is already there rather than trying to start the bandwagon moving on their own. With all these benefits, there's going to be higher wages as ways to promote competition to get the best of the best playing the sport, and people will believe that for that reason, those players are going to be better. Like some people feel college games are better, the same thing happens with the CFL compared to the NFL. Maybe they are better. Maybe some hockey leagues are better in some regards than the NHL (hey, when it was all goon all the time I stopped watching the NHL for a while). I don't think it's going to slow general public perception, though.

I always found it a mite funny that the Americans were trying to break into the Football league. While it's probably going to have some limited success because of the degree of immigrants in America who were fans in their own countries, and the fervor spread by these people to neighbours and relatives, it'll always be viewed as a European and South American dominated sport and I think that's to be expected, no matter how much people would wish it otherwise, without a significant period of time and a very real shift in the world to make that happen.

I think the CFL is an excellent league, and I go to the odd game myself (Calgary Stampeders, so I'm not giving any Edmontonians my address while I live here. :lol:), so I certainly don't think they chimp on the skill. I actually once went to my bank and met one of the guys who was on the Stampeders team working there, and he actually ended up doing some stuff with my account for me, it was awesome. I do wish it got more attention in the public eye, but for Calgary, even with the large American and British import population, the Calgary Flames are still the number one team, and I don't think that's going to change any time soon.

I mean, how often does a Canadian team win the Cup in hockey? Rarely. But we still all go nuts for hockey. I think that says a lot right there. Besides, we all know that all the American teams are really Canadian, anyways. :D


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 13911

Warnings: (40%)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:55 pm
 


Well, I know Hamilton has some of the most loyal fans in the league, second only to the Riders (I'm just sayin!)

But everywhere else I go in Ontario, I hear that the CFL is small time Especially in Toronto, where everyone wants to be a "world class" city with "world class" sports leagues i.e. one of everything New York has.

Do you guys think that even if the CFL brought in billions, it could really get the same social status in Canada as the NFL currently has, without having any American teams?

I also still wonder about the "more talent" assumption of the NFL as a general statement. Clearly, if a player could be excellent in both leagues, they would be in the NFL. But what % of NFL players are really capable of that? 10%? Its not just about skill with hands and feet, its also about having the right size and proportions for the league. I think many, if not most, NFL players are just too large to be successful in the CFL in the same position and may not be able to learn and adapt to a more suitable position. A NFL Running Back can not necessarily become a CFL Middle Linebacker just because he's the right size.


Offline
CKA Elite
CKA Elite
 Calgary Flames
Profile
Posts: 3620
PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 11:40 am
 


One thing I noticed, how much time the QB's have compared to each other in CFL/NFL, those NFL guys have all the time in the world to make their pass with little danger of getting sacked, the CFL on the other hand it's make the play now or get plastered (unless your O line can hold them)
I enjoy both leagues, CFL more though.

Think they should take the winning Grey Cup team vs the winning Superbowl team and have a North American championship with Canadian rules?


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 13425
PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2010 12:11 pm
 


People hate the CFL because they're psuedo football fans who haven't been able to think for themselves since the 1980's when they fell for the bullshit mystique created by the NFL about how great the NFL is and how the Lombardi Trophy Winners are "World Champions".

Because of the illusion created by Steve Sabol and the NFL film people about how great the NFL is, they seem willing to overlook the facts that the NFL is a bloated slow monotonous league with to many teams, little or no parity and what some consider highly overpaid atheletes, while the CFL is an older league with a much longer and more storied history with more parity and a much quicker and more exciting on field product.

In fact, if they were older they'd remember when the NFL was a struggling franchises back in the 50's and 60's overshadowed by both the College game and the CFL. Hell back in the 60's we paid our players more than the NFL did and consequently got most of the good talent, but hey money talks doesn't it.

The only reason the NFL is where it is today is because of the propaganda minister Steve Sabol, NFL films and the amalgamation with the AFL because they got the marketing genius' of people like Al Davis and Lamar hunt who helped them immeasurably in selling their over hyped product to people who think that because it's bigger and costs more money it must be better.


Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 15 posts ] 



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest




 
     
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner.
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © Canadaka.net. Powered by © phpBB.