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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2014 9:21 pm
 


http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/23andme ... -1.2785522

So what does the future hold for easily accessible genetic testing ? Employment contracts, Life Insurance agreements, maybe posting your results on dating sites in search of the perfect mate or for just selling high quality sperm or eggs?

I ordered the kit from the company's website. It cost 200.00 plus 20.00 shipping.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 04, 2014 5:50 am
 


They're my genes. I can do whatever I want to with them, thank you very much. It's about the ethics of freedom.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 12:56 pm
 


JeanRose770, I suspect you're interested in health related issues? Am I right?


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 1:02 pm
 


BartSimpson BartSimpson:
JeanRose770, I suspect you're interested in health related issues? Am I right?


Spamming e-cigarettes, more likely. That and witch doctors.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 2:09 pm
 


Ooops. She's been treated by Dr. Banhammer! :lol:


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2014 2:35 pm
 


Interesting link here if you wish to read it.

http://stlr.org/2010/03/09/tissue-right ... -a-person/

The Personal Side to the Story

Recently, renewed interest in this cell line has focused on its origin rather than its results. In this case, scientists named HeLa cells after the patient in whom they first found them: Henrietta Lacks. Lacks suffered from a particularly virulent strain of cervical cancer and, after unsuccessful radium treatment, died in 1951 at Johns Hopkins Hospital, Maryland. Without Lacks’ knowledge or consent, her doctor shared a sample of her tumors with a researcher, Dr. George Gey, intent on developing an immortal cell line. With Lacks’ tumor cells, the researcher succeeded in making the line that led to medical advancements and high profits.

This behind-the-back cellular research and development story has recently become the subject of controversy. “Tissue rights” scholars now question whether or not patients should retain any control over cells removed from their body. Currently, cells be bought and sold without the patients’ permission, but tissue rights advocates suggest that these often-unwitting donors deserve a share in the profits their cells eventually reap.

Complicating the issue is the fact that some believe Henrietta Lacks’ story to primarily be a “case of a black woman whose body had been exploited by white scientists.” The contrast between her children and grandchildren’s continued poverty and the vast profits made from commercializing the HeLa cell line heightens the feeling that the scientists responsible cheated Lacks and her family. Also troubling is the fact that researchers continued to collect genetic material for the purposes of HeLa cell development from these family members long after Lacks died, under the guise of routine cancer screening diagnostics.

Legal Complications

Given the current state of the law, the Henrietta Lackses of the world have a hard argument to make if they believe they deserve a share of the profits. In a similar case in the 1980s, researchers removed the spleen of John Moore as part of his leukemia treatment. Recognizing the unique scientific and financial potential of Moore’s particular cancerous cells, his doctor promptly developed a cell line from the extracted lymphocytes, patented the line, and licensed it for hundreds of thousands of dollars. The doctor also gathered samples of Moore’s blood and other tissue on future visits; he told Moore’s that his continued health depended upon such testing but did not reveal that he was keeping the samples to aid in his research. The resulting cell line, Mo, now has a market value of around $3 billion.

Placing a patent on a gene(s) in Canada. This will go to the SCoC as the company has nothing to lose and everything to gain.
http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/u-s-gene- ... -1.2820211


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 10:09 pm
 


If you don't want genetic discrimination do NOT take a a genetic test. And a lot of people are stupid enough to do it willingly with 23 and me. Dumb!


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:30 pm
 


this is a timely story. i just bought my kid (and me) dna tests for christmas. my ex wife's family was pretty big. several kids with several different fathers. i never met her father, and neither did she. her brothers and sisters were all snow white, she looked like she was from the carribean with that permanent tan colored skin. she was from new brunswick. i always thought that her dad was either first nation, or half first nation. the tobique first nation reservation was right where we lived. i am as white as you can get. scottish on my fathers side. my grandfather on my mothers side immigrated from sweden as a child. i have his genes, the blond hair and blue eyes. my daughter has that permanent tan look like her mother. she is always accusing me of kidnapping her as a baby. people are always speaking spanish to her when we are in the tropics. no one ever does that to me. it will be interesting to see what they come up with for results.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 3:02 am
 


rickc rickc:
this is a timely story.


Actually rick, if you check the dates of the previous posts you will see this is a 3 year old necro...... :wink:


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 7:52 am
 


rickc rickc:
this is a timely story. i just bought my kid (and me) dna tests for christmas. my ex wife's family was pretty big. several kids with several different fathers. i never met her father, and neither did she. her brothers and sisters were all snow white, she looked like she was from the carribean with that permanent tan colored skin. she was from new brunswick. i always thought that her dad was either first nation, or half first nation. the tobique first nation reservation was right where we lived. i am as white as you can get. scottish on my fathers side. my grandfather on my mothers side immigrated from sweden as a child. i have his genes, the blond hair and blue eyes. my daughter has that permanent tan look like her mother. she is always accusing me of kidnapping her as a baby. people are always speaking spanish to her when we are in the tropics. no one ever does that to me. it will be interesting to see what they come up with for results.



What test did you buy? I did the National Geographic test, which was interesting but not really revelatory


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 17, 2017 8:15 am
 


Ancestry DNA


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