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PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 6:22 am
 


Sunnyways wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
I'm all for evidence based decisions, and that is one. There is no real reason to keep Cannibus illegal, while things like Tobacco, Alcohol and even fentanyl are legal.


Fentanyl is a highly effective anesthetic but it is also a controlled substance.


Not in China, which is why it keeps being smuggled in to Canada.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 10:11 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Sunnyways wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
I'm all for evidence based decisions, and that is one. There is no real reason to keep Cannibus illegal, while things like Tobacco, Alcohol and even fentanyl are legal.


Fentanyl is a highly effective anesthetic but it is also a controlled substance.


Not in China, which is why it keeps being smuggled in to Canada.


Two approaches. 1. Ask the Chinese to shut down the factories making this stuff. 2. Search more of the small packages coming in from China.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2017 11:35 am
 


I am sick and tired of nations cowing down to the United States. Donald Trump is an idiot and anyone who supports him must like the Kool-Aid. He wants to kill NAFTA. Fine. Let him do it. Canada and Mexico can negotiate a bi-lateral agreement and charge huge tariffs on everything that is imported from the states. They make shit anyway. Trump's idea of creating jobs is destroying jobs but the 'Trumpette's love him so. Go ahead Make America Great again but no other country will want to deal with you. Build all the shit you want and mine all the coal you want but no one will buy it. I think the US regressed 60 years when they elected the Great Pumpkin


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 11:39 am
 


Scuttlebutt on the radio is that the non-starter demands from the US, like increased access to bid on government contracts by US firms, but US Governments protected by the "Buy America" policy - are not only serious, but the starting point for negotiations.

So, kiss NAFTA goodbye! :(


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 11:52 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Scuttlebutt on the radio is that the non-starter demands from the US, like increased access to bid on government contracts by US firms, but US Governments protected by the "Buy America" policy - are not only serious, but the starting point for negotiations.

So, kiss NAFTA goodbye! :(


I've long maintained that the unreasonable negotiating points were simply justification for killing NAFTA, which was Trump's original promise as I recall.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:00 pm
 


BartSimpson wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
Scuttlebutt on the radio is that the non-starter demands from the US, like increased access to bid on government contracts by US firms, but US Governments protected by the "Buy America" policy - are not only serious, but the starting point for negotiations.

So, kiss NAFTA goodbye! :(


I've long maintained that the unreasonable negotiating points were simply justification for killing NAFTA, which was Trump's original promise as I recall.


You did. And I also maintained it will come back to burn Trump. It's a dick move, and the world is watching.

Quote:
In particular, Canada and Mexico now have a new way to push back against U.S. demands that more auto components be built in the United States. Under current NAFTA rules, 62.5 percent of vehicle parts for cars sold under the pact have to come from one of the three countries in the trade pact. The Trump administration, which blames NAFTA for U.S. job losses, wants to rewrite the deal so that fully half of all automotive components come from the United States alone, to the disadvantage of Canada and Mexico. (Even the U.S. auto industry opposes Trump’s plan because it would upend existing supply chains.)

The revived TPP includes less restrictive — not more restrictive — rules on where automotive components can be made. Since both Canada and Mexico are in that pact, they’d be hard-pressed to adopt different rules just to deal with the United States.


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For Canada, long reliant on trade with the United States, the new American-free TPP is a lot more appealing than the old one. For the first time ever, according to Canada’s Angus Reid Institute, a majority of Canadians support the new pact, and twice as many want expanded trade with Asia versus more trade with the United States.


Quote:
But by laying out hard-to-meet demands and threatening to let even a renegotiated NAFTA lapse after just a few years, the Trump administration is making potential trade partners in Asia wary. The White House has assumed that America’s economic heft means it can browbeat trade partners into acceding to its demands, said Claude Barfield of the American Enterprise Institute.

“One of the things that will really undercut the Trump administration is the demands that they have made in NAFTA, beyond the normal demands,” he said. “If you’re Vietnam, you’d think twice” before entering talks with the United States, he said.

Neither Japan nor Vietnam, both TPP members, has expressed any interest in sitting down with the United States to hammer out bilateral frameworks. Last week, Japan’s finance minister explicitly rejected the idea of a bilateral agreement. The Trump administration is expected to make an announcement on Wednesday regarding outcomes of the president’s recent trip.


http://foreignpolicy.com/2017/11/14/the ... co-canada/


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 14, 2017 2:20 pm
 


You know, the point of sovereignty is that you get to set your own rules.

If the rest of the world ends up isolating the US on trade then that becomes reciprocal and it'll eventually reach to diplomatic and military efforts.

And maybe that's part of Trump's plan, too.

He's a complex individual who thinks three moves ahead of everyone else. Yes, I know that will trigger some snowflakes but the fact remains that he's outmaneuvered all of his political opponents so far. Stupid people can't do such things.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 7:07 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
You know, the point of sovereignty is that you get to set your own rules.

If the rest of the world ends up isolating the US on trade then that becomes reciprocal and it'll eventually reach to diplomatic and military efforts.

And maybe that's part of Trump's plan, too.


Precisely. And we aren't going to sign a deal that is bad for us, any more than you are. The difference being, we are willing to compromise; to walk away from the table feeling we didn't get everything we wanted in order that everyone comes away a winner. Trump has sent 'negotiators' in to get exactly what he wants, and to use that position to walk away from the table calling it a failure when those unattainable goals aren't reached. No one else will sign one-on-one trade deals with the US if that is to be the Trump Administration's policy - and perhaps even with Trump's successor if the bad taste is still there afterwards.

If Trumps plan is to shrink the economic and diplomatic power of the US, then he might just achieve it. And I hope he gets all the blame credit as well.

In the meantime, we've been broadening our trade options, and with a deal with Europe and soon the Pacific Rim, we'd rather be in NAFTA as well. NAFTA has been beneficial to all 3 countries, and we'd like to maintain that good relationship. But if not, well, we're just not that into you anymore and have already started seeing other countries. ;)


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 9:04 am
 


So, proof that Canada will not back down on removing Section 19 arbitration from NAFTA, or one final trial that we have always won at?

Canada to seek NAFTA dispute resolution panel on U.S. softwood lumber duties


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:27 pm
 


A timely article!

Quote:
President Trump keeps touting the 3 percent U.S. GDP growth of the last two quarters and “record” stock prices, and the economy is his best talking point. But he might want to take a look at the latest Journal survey of economists about the impact of a U.S. withdrawal from the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Not a single economist said that the withdrawal Mr. Trump has threatened would help the economy. Some 82 percent said the economy would grow more slowly for the next two years than it would otherwise, and 7 percent predicted a recession. That underestimates the risks of recession in our view, given the political shock from such a reckless act by a U.S. President and the damage that would ensue to North American and even global supply chains.

Mr. Trump is doing well overall on economic policy, with deregulation and support for tax reform. But his Achilles’ heel is his protectionist trade agenda and his lack of knowledge about the international economy.


Quote:
In the years since NAFTA was enacted, U.S. manufacturing has grown, trade has grown, exports have grown, employment has grown, wages have grown, the services industry has absolutely boomed, and consumer prices for many North American–traded goods have gone down. Why mess with a good thing?

Criticisms of NAFTA tend to be either very vague or dramatically sweeping. But the economic data do not support the populist indictment of free trade and free-trade pacts.

The overwhelming consensus among economists is that NAFTA has had a negligible to modestly positive impact on U.S. employment and wages, and a modest to substantial effect on GDP growth — adding as much as 0.5 percent annually by some estimates.


If Trump Scraps NAFTA, We’re All Going to Be Much Poorer


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 12:57 pm
 


Quote:
He's a complex individual who thinks three moves ahead of everyone else

Three thumbstrokes behind when he tweets at 3 AM...

Killing NAFTA is about the stupidest move anyone could make. But hell, I don't see the outrage against TPP and the EU trade talks here since the Annoying Orange took over...


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 1:05 pm
 


herbie wrote:
I don't see the outrage against TPP and the EU trade talks here since the Annoying Orange took over...


Because the bits the US business wanted WRT things like copyright and intellectual property have been removed from TPP, and were never in CETA.

Like I wrote, we are seeing other countries now, and that weakens the economic hold the US has over Canada and Mexico.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 2:00 pm
 


DrCaleb wrote:


The same people said he wouldn't win a primary. Then they said he'd lose to Hillary.

Given their track record if we leave NAFTA we won't know where to put all the money we end up with. :wink:


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:03 am
 


Quote:
David Orchard – How the Americans could save us from ourselves on free trade

Posted 24 January 2018 by NNL Staff in Editorial

By David Orchard

In 1854, the Canadian colonies entered a free trade agreement with the United States. In 1866, the Americans cancelled it, believing that the Canadian colonies had become so dependent on the U.S. economically that they would ask, or beg, for entry into the American Union.

Instead, the Canadians decided to take the bold step of independence. They negotiated a union of the Canadian colonies and began building a Canadian-owned and controlled economy, including the world’s longest railway.

Canada’s next major free trade agreement with the U.S. was in 1988 (FTA), later expanded to include Mexico in 1994 (NAFTA). Under their terms, much of Canada’s economy has been bought up by American owners — everything from Hudson’s Bay Company to Tim Hortons and Stelco. Whole industries have been taken over by U.S. investors, including both our national railways. U.S. corporations have the right to sue Canada for any law or regulation that causes them loss or damage and which they feel contravenes the spirit of NAFTA. (Canada has been sued three dozen times and paid out more than $200 million in NAFTA penalties.)

However, the U.S. government may again save us from ourselves.

The U.S. is demanding even greater concessions from Canada in a “renegotiation” of NAFTA, including sweeping rights to buy up what is left of Canada’s economy. It has stated that it is ready to trigger the six-month cancellation clause of NAFTA. In response, the Canadian government has spent millions trying to convince it not to do so.

As in 1866, Canada has a choice: to integrate itself even further into the U.S. economy, giving up the dream of Canadian independence, or it can do what it did in 1866: step forward and build a Canadian-owned, world-class economy. It can stop pleading with the U.S. to keep NAFTA and emerge as a significant competitor to our neighbour, not its colony.

. . .



http://www.netnewsledger.com/2018/01/24 ... ree-trade/


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 24, 2018 9:36 am
 


Any of the negotiators in Canada or Mexico who thinks they're going to come off smelling sweet after dealing with a PoS like Trump is deluded. This fucker thinks he's the master of the deal after going bankrupt countless times. he couldn't run a casino for Christ's sake. The only ones he's fooling are a bunch of mouthbreathers.


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