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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 4:32 pm
 


Majority Supports Study to Evaluate Taxation and Regulation of Marijuana
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Vancouver, BC [April 18, 2013] — A new Angus Reid poll released today shows that British Columbians overwhelmingly support the province undertaking a pilot study to evaluate the taxation and regulation of adult cannabis use.

The survey, conducted between April 8 and 9, found that 73 per cent of British Columbians support a B.C. research trial conducted by local experts and health scientists to evaluate whether the taxation and strict regulation of adult marijuana use could reduce profits to organized crime and better prevent youth access to the drug.

Furthermore, 44 per cent of British Columbians say their perception of a provincial political party would improve if they supported a trial of this nature, compared to 33 per cent who say their opinion would be unchanged and just 12 per cent who said their opinion would worsen.

“These results clearly indicate British Columbians, regardless of their political affiliation, would welcome researching a new approach to marijuana policy involving the taxation and regulation of adult use,” said Mario Canseco, Vice President, Angus Reid Public Opinion. “Consistently our polling results are showing the public is demanding a new approach and turning away from strategies like mandatory minimum sentences for marijuana offenses.”

Stop the Violence BC (STVBC) has issued an Election 2013 questionnaire to B.C.’s four major political parties in advance of the May 14th election asking whether they would support a research trial of cannabis regulation.

“British Columbians clearly want their politicians to show leadership on marijuana policy reform,” said Geoff Plant, who served as B.C. attorney general from 2001 to 2005 under the BC Liberals. “With the province facing an election in a few weeks, now is the time for all political parties to let the public know whether they will support the proposed research trial of cannabis taxation and regulation.”

An Angus Reid poll from November 2012 showed 75 per cent support for the taxation and regulation of marijuana, and voters in both Washington State and Colorado recently passed initiatives to tax and regulate the adult use of marijuana.

“What we’ve witnessed in Washington State is the public no longer tolerating poorly conceived laws and rejecting marijuana prohibition as an enormous failure in the United States,” said John McKay, the former U.S. attorney for the Western District of Washington State. “British Columbia has an opportunity to join Washington State and show the world, criminal prohibition is a costly failure and public health and safety will be better served by legalization, strict regulation and capturing, through taxation, the profits we’ve handed over to the drug cartels and thugs for decades.”

STVBC is advocating for a research group to develop and coordinate an ethically approved research trial to assess the impacts of a government-sanctioned cannabis retail establishment for adult recreational cannabis users. Such a trial could legally operate under a Section 56 exemption of the federal Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and would assess impacts on users and the local community as well as estimate operation costs and potential tax revenue. The federal government has recently provided Section 56 exemptions to assess the impacts of heroin prescription in the Downtown Eastside as well as a trial of prescription MDMA (ecstasy) for post-traumatic stress disorder.

“Our politicians have been out of step with public opinion on this issue for too long,” said Ujjal Dosanjh, former New Democratic premier of B.C. “With the support of nearly three-quarters of British Columbians on the one hand, and prohibition-related violence and criminal activity across B.C. on the other, our provincial leaders have to support researching alternatives.”

The proposed research trial is presently being designed, and initial proposals suggest it could operate with the objectives of improving community health and safety by: reducing unsafe and illegal grow ops through sanctioned safe cannabis producers, redirecting organized crime profits to fund addiction treatment and other underfunded health and social programs, and assess for potential negative consequences for trial participants and the local community.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 4:46 pm
 


Nothing like some research to finaly shut the pot heads up. If the study finds it not to be all rainbows and extra tax money will the pot supporters STFU and leave everyone else alone and start following the law again?

Yeah didn't think so.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:15 pm
 


Xort wrote:
Nothing like some research to finaly shut the pot heads up. If the study finds it not to be all rainbows and extra tax money will the pot supporters STFU and leave everyone else alone and start following the law again?

Yeah didn't think so.


Easiest answer is for you to go punch all of the potheads in the face. That'll smarten them up. :lol:





PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:21 pm
 


ROTFL



The regulation supporters might stfu if the prohibitionists showed some evidence, somewhere, in any significance that prohibition works. But they haven't been able to do that for 40 years even as evidence mounted to the contrary. So we'll continue to chip away at it until its gone.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:27 pm
 


Xort wrote:
Nothing like some research to finaly shut the pot heads up. If the study finds it not to be all rainbows and extra tax money will the pot supporters STFU and leave everyone else alone and start following the law again?

Yeah didn't think so.

Why do you care if others smoke pot? How does it affect you in way?


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:32 pm
 


Lemmy wrote:
Xort wrote:
Nothing like some research to finaly shut the pot heads up. If the study finds it not to be all rainbows and extra tax money will the pot supporters STFU and leave everyone else alone and start following the law again?

Yeah didn't think so.

Why do you care if others smoke pot? How does it affect you in way?


He doesn't like the smell. Punching.them all in the face will eliminate it.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:48 pm
 


I hope I'm the pothead he chooses to punch. The only thing that'd eliminated, however, would be his ability to chew.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:53 pm
 


Lemmy wrote:
I hope I'm the pothead he chooses to punch. The only thing that'd eliminated, however, would be his ability to chew.


He's a combat vet. He might get all tank gunner on you. Best be wary! :lol:

And he's a really good shot in a firefight!





PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 5:54 pm
 


Lemmy wrote:
I hope I'm the pothead he chooses to punch. The only thing that'd eliminated, however, would be his ability to chew.


I'd let the lawyers do the fighting. I've never punched anybody in the face, and I don't plan to start now.





PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 6:01 pm
 


Stop the Violence attempts to smoke out politicians on marijuana issue
Quote:
APRIL 18, 2013
It's not the "did you inhale" question many politicians have been asked, but a lobby group will be questioning want-to-be politicians on their position over a regulated marijuana market in British Columbia.

Stop the Violence BC — a coalition of police, doctors, lawyers, politicians and academics — argues a regulated and taxed marijuana market could choke the flow of funds going to organized crime, reduce the proliferation of illegal grow-ops in B.C. and fund drug awareness and harm prevention campaigns.

The group proposes a research trial that would test the impact of a regulated marijuana market in British Columbia.

Dr. Evan Wood, who founded the Stop the Violence BC coalition, said the trial would fit under an exemption in the federal drug law — the same exemption that Insite, the supervised drug injection site in B.C., already operate under.

"This would be something that is fully compliant with the international treaties that Canada is signatory to and fully compliant to our federal drug laws," Wood said.

Wood said B.C. politicians have hid behind the argument that marijuana is a federally controlled substance and criminal law falls under federal jurisdiction.

Shirley Bond, the Liberal attorney general who is running for re-election, said her party has been clear about its position on the legal aspects of cannabis control.

"We've said clearly that any significant change to how we manage this from a law enforcement perspective in British Columbia needs to be led by the federal government."

Bond said, however, a Liberal government would welcome coalition members to "bring their proposal and give us the opportunity to look at what it says."

Former Liberal attorney general Geoff Plant said he is heartened to hear that Bond is at least open to hearing his argument.

"That's not slamming the door," said Plant, who is among five attorneys general who are members of the Stop the Violence BC coalition.

"I think it is appropriate for any provincial government to pick and choose the federal issues it wants to take on," said Plant, adding that this issue is one that needs to get a lot more traction if the federal law is ever to be challenged.

"I'm not asking any candidate for the legislature today to support legalization, though I hope one day they will," said Plant.

"I'm only asking whether they would go out of their way (to prevent) an important piece of research that will help us all learn what we need to know," he said.

"You would be hard pressed to find a better example of a law whose unintended consequences are more perniciously contrary to its intended effect than this one," he said, adding that cannabis prohibition has provided "the economic incentive for an enormous underground economy and routinely kills people on our streets."

The NDP have expressed their support for decriminalizing marijuana but have also hid behind the argument that the matter is a federal one and out of their jurisdiction.

"It doesn't appear that the federal government has any interest in decriminalization," NDP justice critic Leonard Krog said in an interview last year.

Last year, mayors from eight B.C. communities added their voice to the coalition's call for a regulated and taxed marijuana market, and academics recently pegged the value of the B.C. pot industry at between $443 million and $564 million a year.

A 2012 study, conducted by the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University researchers who are members of the coalition, said there are more 366,000 pot users in B.C.


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366,000 punches to the face is a lot for one guy to manage. And that's just in BC.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 6:49 pm
 


Legalize it.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 7:52 pm
 


It won't change my perception of the Provincial political parties if they do or do not support this proposed research project. There are more important issues to me that will determine who I vote for.

Besides, what's the point in going through all that effort and cost (btw... who will be paying for this?) just to end up reaching the conclusion that they already believe to be true?

Regardless of yet another survey or yet another study, legalization of pot is still a Federal issue, not a Provincial one. In the next Federal election in 2015 we should just have this as a damn referendum question, let the country vote yes or no and be done with it.


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 18, 2013 8:02 pm
 


That's a rational statement, Strutz, but the problem is that this isn't an issue to be decided upon by majority rule. It's about INDIVIDUAL rights. If something is your right, the majority doesn't get to take that right away from you. That's a fundamental purpose of the Charter: to protect the individual from the group.

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice.





PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 6:47 am
 


Strutz wrote:
Regardless of yet another survey or yet another study, legalization of pot is still a Federal issue, not a Provincial one. In the next Federal election in 2015 we should just have this as a damn referendum question, let the country vote yes or no and be done with it.


Quote:
Dr. Evan Wood, who founded the Stop the Violence BC coalition, said the trial would fit under an exemption in the federal drug law — the same exemption that Insite, the supervised drug injection site in B.C., already operate under.

"This would be something that is fully compliant with the international treaties that Canada is signatory to and fully compliant to our federal drug laws," Wood said.


Insite is an example of how the provinces forced the issue. The federal government fought them, and lost.

The provinces forced the end of alcohol prohibition.

It's the provinces who need to bring Ottawa around on this issue.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 19, 2013 6:58 am
 


Lemmy wrote:
That's a rational statement, Strutz, but the problem is that this isn't an issue to be decided upon by majority rule. It's about INDIVIDUAL rights. If something is your right, the majority doesn't get to take that right away from you. That's a fundamental purpose of the Charter: to protect the individual from the group.

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice.


Now you get into the murky waters of what constitutes a right. Smoking pot is a right within the charter?

How so and what are the firings arcs for individual rights?


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