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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:56 pm
 


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Time to find the old hardhat I used for the Skylab re-entry in '79. :lol:

$1:
By next weekend, a U.S. satellite the size of a bus will return to Earth – destination unknown.

U.S. space officials have been monitoring the decommissioned satellite closely and have calculated that 26 pieces, one weighing 159 kilograms, will survive re-entry at a speed of 29,000 km/h and hit the Earth within a day or two of Friday. While they can't predict where the space junk will land, they do know for certain it will not hit Antarctica.

The chances of being hit by a piece of the disintegrating satellite are 1 in 3,200, which is greater than the odds of being hit by lightning. The odds are low because most of the planet is covered by water.

NASA officials say there has only been one case of a person being hit by space debris. In 1997, Oklahoma resident Lottie Williams was hit in the shoulder by a piece of metal the size of her hand while she was walking in a park in Tulsa. She was not injured.

Carried into orbit by the space shuttle Discovery 20 years ago, the 5.4-tonne Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite was used to study chemical components of the atmosphere and various light transmitted by the sun. The satellite was switched off in 2005.



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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 8:12 pm
 


Time to get my cast iron umbrella out. :D


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 19, 2011 8:24 pm
 


$1:
U.S. space officials have been monitoring the decommissioned satellite closely and have calculated that 26 pieces, one weighing 159 kilograms, will survive re-entry at a speed of 29,000 km/h and hit the Earth within a day or two of Friday. While they can't predict where the space junk will land, they do know for certain it will not hit Antarctica.


Anybody else find it funny that while they can predict how many pieces the spacecraft will break into (and how much those pieces weigh), the closest they can get to a location is "not Antarctica"?


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 3:45 pm
 


raydan raydan:
Time to get my cast iron umbrella out. :D



Wile E. raydan.......genius


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ROTFL ROTFL ROTFL


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 3:48 pm
 


Hyack Hyack:
Image

Time to find the old hardhat I used for the Skylab re-entry in '79. :lol:

$1:
By next weekend, a U.S. satellite the size of a bus will return to Earth – destination unknown.

U.S. space officials have been monitoring the decommissioned satellite closely and have calculated that 26 pieces, one weighing 159 kilograms, will survive re-entry at a speed of 29,000 km/h and hit the Earth within a day or two of Friday. While they can't predict where the space junk will land, they do know for certain it will not hit Antarctica.

The chances of being hit by a piece of the disintegrating satellite are 1 in 3,200, which is greater than the odds of being hit by lightning. The odds are low because most of the planet is covered by water.

NASA officials say there has only been one case of a person being hit by space debris. In 1997, Oklahoma resident Lottie Williams was hit in the shoulder by a piece of metal the size of her hand while she was walking in a park in Tulsa. She was not injured.

Carried into orbit by the space shuttle Discovery 20 years ago, the 5.4-tonne Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite was used to study chemical components of the atmosphere and various light transmitted by the sun. The satellite was switched off in 2005.



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Once again NASA allows me to rev up my ebay account.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 4:02 pm
 


Better be quick about it, NASA now says it could be coming down sometime between Thursday and Saturday between 57 degrees North and 57 degrees South lat.

$1:
The Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), which was decommissioned in 2005, is expected to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere on Sept. 23, plus or minus a day, NASA reported Monday afternoon.

NASA expects any surviving components to land between 57 north degrees latitude – about 300 kilometres south of the boundary between the territories and the provinces — and 57 degrees south latitude. The debris is expected to be scattered across an area about 800 kilometres long, but NASA said the location of that zone is "impossible to pinpoint."



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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 4:40 pm
 


That would make a hell of a headstone! :P
"Hit by spacejunk" :)


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:28 pm
 


I heard that odds of "buying the farm" on this one is 1:3,200 and is deemed not very likely yet the government agencies will pollute the media with 6-49 jackpots where the odds of winning with a ticket are 1:13,983,816. Or in other words, you are more likely to get boinked by this pile of junk than winning the big one in 6-49 by a factor of about 4,370 times.


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 20, 2011 6:46 pm
 


The odds of the debris hitting somebody are 1:3,200. The odds of it being YOU are errrrr..... astronomical! Since nobody has ever been hit by space debris, can they even put odds on it? Your best bet is to go out and buy your 649 ticket.....you have better odds of winning than of dying.

**edit**

$1:
NASA says the odds of a person being hit by part of the disintegrating satellite are one in 3,200. That means the odds of you, the reader, being personally hit by space junk is actually one in 21 trillion.



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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 11:38 am
 


saturn_656 saturn_656:
$1:
U.S. space officials have been monitoring the decommissioned satellite closely and have calculated that 26 pieces, one weighing 159 kilograms, will survive re-entry at a speed of 29,000 km/h and hit the Earth within a day or two of Friday. While they can't predict where the space junk will land, they do know for certain it will not hit Antarctica.


Anybody else find it funny that while they can predict how many pieces the spacecraft will break into (and how much those pieces weigh), the closest they can get to a location is "not Antarctica"?


No. Because that's how orbital mechanics work. If the satellite had an orbit that took it beween 60 N and 60 S, then it will not be possible to hit Antarctica on re-entry. But most other land masses are not so lucky. To know where it will hit, they have to know when it will re-enter, and that isn't known.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 12:16 pm
 


This is a bit ignorant, but given that 70% of Earth's surface is ocean, isn't likely that it'll splash down in the ocean somewhere?


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 1:29 pm
 


bootlegga bootlegga:
This is a bit ignorant, but given that 70% of Earth's surface is ocean, isn't likely that it'll splash down in the ocean somewhere?


Yup. (Not that it's ignorant, that it's likely for a water splashdown)

Your odds are something like 72 times more likely to win the lottery than be hit by debris from this, but people will still worry about it while buying lotto tickets.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 1:47 pm
 


DrCaleb DrCaleb:
bootlegga bootlegga:
This is a bit ignorant, but given that 70% of Earth's surface is ocean, isn't likely that it'll splash down in the ocean somewhere?


Yup. (Not that it's ignorant, that it's likely for a water splashdown)

Your odds are something like 72 times more likely to win the lottery than be hit by debris from this, but people will still worry about it while buying lotto tickets.


:lol:

I actually buy lotto tickets once and a while - my thinking is, if you're going to dream, dream big!


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 21, 2011 3:59 pm
 


DrCaleb DrCaleb:
bootlegga bootlegga:
This is a bit ignorant, but given that 70% of Earth's surface is ocean, isn't likely that it'll splash down in the ocean somewhere?


Yup. (Not that it's ignorant, that it's likely for a water splashdown)

Your odds are something like 72 times more likely to win the lottery than be hit by debris from this, but people will still worry about it while buying lotto tickets.


NASA says the odds of a person being hit by part of the disintegrating satellite are one in 3,200. That means the odds of you, the reader, being personally hit by space junk is actually one in 21 trillion.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2011 10:29 am
 


Hyack Hyack:
DrCaleb DrCaleb:
bootlegga bootlegga:
This is a bit ignorant, but given that 70% of Earth's surface is ocean, isn't likely that it'll splash down in the ocean somewhere?


Yup. (Not that it's ignorant, that it's likely for a water splashdown)

Your odds are something like 72 times more likely to win the lottery than be hit by debris from this, but people will still worry about it while buying lotto tickets.


NASA says the odds of a person being hit by part of the disintegrating satellite are one in 3,200. That means the odds of you, the reader, being personally hit by space junk is actually one in 21 trillion.


Whoa, I was an order of magnitude out. :( If probabilty of wining the 649 is 1 in 13 million, so getting hit by orbital debris makes it 1.5 million times less likely you or I will get hit than to win the lottery.


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