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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 11:51 am
 


Yes, but...

Then hens laying all of those eggs had their brothers killed not long after they were born...

http://blogs.discovery.com/animal_news/ ... alive.html


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 12:02 pm
 


it's depressing how much i fully agree with vegan ideology but simply do not follow it in the slightest. perhaps when i'm older.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 12:07 pm
 


I find bison meat is a real treat. It's red meat like beef, but more lean. And very tasty. Unfortunately it's also more expensive.

I saw a documentary called "Guns, Germs, and Steel". One major point is civilization is successful when it uses food sources that evolved for that environment, not food imported from a different climate. The show gave an example that attempts to grow wheat in Africa were a failure, for a few reasons, sorghum is a local grain that works. So I looked at Manitoba. Bison and elk are native, so should make great meat. And there are 2 varieties of bison: prairie and forest. Forest bison are even larger, and eat plants native to boreal forest. You can't grow much on the east side of Lake Winnipeg, because it's boreal forest growing directly on Canada shield. Soil is just inches thick before you get bedrock, with patches of bedrock exposed on the surface. Not much grows there. But you could ranch forest bison. And elk eat plants that grow in the northern part of the Interlake (between Lake Winnipeg and Lake Manitoba/Lake Winnipegosis/Cedar Lake). So you could pasture elk on land not suitable for traditional crops. Pasturing means the animals will harvest the plants themselves, no need for a harvester. But for some reason farmers are raising prairie bison and elk on land in southern Manitoba, and feeding them grain. That raises the cost. Manitobans are cheap, if you provide red meat at a lower price per pound than beef, they'll buy that. At a higher price, you have a very limited market. Oh well.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 12:48 pm
 


Cattle have been bred to pack on weight. Bison and Elk eat a lot of food but stay lean, because they have evolved that way.

That is why it costs more to eat Elk and Bison per lb than beef.

Dad raised Elk for awhile. Not for meat, for the antler velvet. Raising them for meat is not profitable. At all.

They eat too much and put on too little weight. You can graze the same land with beef and produce a lot more meat.


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 1:04 pm
 


The Sierra Club complained about raising elk. They didn't want anything they consider to be "wildlife" to be raised for meat. They said young elk put on 100 pounds in 100 days. My thinking was "which side are you arguing?" That sounds like a good reason to raise them.

But my suggestion was to raise these animals on land not suitable for traditional agriculture. Elk in the northern Interlake, and even round Flin Flon. Forest bison on the east side of Lake Winnipeg. Not prairie bison, I said forest bison. Again on land not suitable for anything else. That should make the land very cheap. Cheap land should make pasturing affordable. One goal with pasturing is to eliminate the need to buy feed (fodder). I read that raising elk would require planting some annuals in the pasture field, but most plants that elk eat are perennial and native to the area so don't need seeding. That drastically reduces feed cost.

Did your Dad provide feed, or pasture?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2015 1:26 pm
 


Pasture, supplemented with feed once in awhile.

The expensive part of your plan would be fencing the area in. We built some very tall, very strong fence for those critters.

You would have huge tracts of land in the areas you are talking about. That's a lot of very expensive fence.


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