CKA Forums
Login 
canadian forums
bottom
 
 
Canadian Forums

Author Topic Options
Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 10993
PostPosted: Mon Dec 04, 2017 12:50 pm
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Quote:
After 37 years, Voyager 1 has fired up its trajectory thrusters

At present, the Voyager 1 spacecraft is 21 billion kilometers from Earth, or about 141 times the distance between the Earth and Sun. It has, in fact, moved beyond our Solar System into interstellar space. However, we can still communicate with Voyager across that distance.

This week, the scientists and engineers on the Voyager team did something very special. They commanded the spacecraft to fire a set of four trajectory thrusters for the first time in 37 years to determine their ability to orient the spacecraft using 10-millisecond pulses.

After sending the commands on Tuesday, it took 19 hours and 35 minutes for the signal to reach Voyager. Then, the Earth-bound spacecraft team had to wait another 19 hours and 35 minutes to see if the spacecraft responded. It did. After nearly four decades of dormancy, the Aerojet Rocketdyne manufactured thrusters fired perfectly.

Image


https://arstechnica.com/science/2017/12 ... thrusters/


But you drop your iPhone from 1M high, and it's all over!

That's fantastic!


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:12 am
 


Quote:
Exclusive: NASA has begun plans for a 2069 interstellar mission

IF A small, scrappy group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, get their way, the 100th anniversary of Apollo 11 – the first crewed moon landing – will see a spacecraft launched to a nearby exoplanet to look for life.

The project is so new it doesn’t have a name – and most of the technology it needs doesn’t exist yet. But there’s plenty of time to work out the kinks before 2069.

“It’s very nebulous,” says Anthony Freeman at JPL, who presented the mission concept at the 2017 American Geophysical Union conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, on 12 December.



https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg ... r-mission/


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:14 am
 


Quote:
'Weird' interstellar asteroid yields no alien signals, resembles worlds beyond Neptune

Shocked astronomers had never seen anything like it: a bizarrely shaped rock ejected from another stellar system, just passing through ours.

So strange was the discovery back in October, astronomers around the world turned their telescopes toward the cigar-shaped asteroid in the hope of uncovering its mysteries — including even listening for signs of alien life.

Breakthrough Listen, one arm of an international project dedicated to searching for signs of intelligent life in the universe, started eavesdropping earlier this month using a telescope in West Virginia. But the group says it has found no evidence of artificial signals coming from the rock known as 1I/2017 U1 'Oumuamua, which means "messenger from afar who arrived here first" in Hawaiian.

The organization says it continues to listen across other radio frequencies and analyze the collected data.
Other stars, other worlds

Michele Bannister of Queen's University Belfast says the chance to study something that came from another solar system can provide scientists with crucial information to test their theory of planetary evolution.

"We can do stuff here that we simply can never do in detail for other systems. And then a piece of one comes visiting!" said Bannister, the lead author of a new study about 'Oumuamua that was accepted for publication in the journal Earth and Planetary Astrophysics.

"We can actually connect the theory to the reality."

'Oumuamua, which is about 400 metres long and 40 metres wide, raises many questions Bannister would love to answer.

"I would like to know what its home star system looked like," she said. "I want another one. I want to know this object isn't unusual. Is it statistically a reasonable example of what we expect to see wandering the cosmos?"

Image
Quote:
This is 'Oumuamua, circled, as seen by the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope on La Palma, Spain. (A. Fitzsimmons, QUB/Isaac Newton Group, La Palma.)



She says with more and more telescopes dedicated to sky surveys, the chances of discovering more rocks drifting from other solar systems are increasing.

"That's something that I'm really looking forward to: the launch of the new field of interstellar asteroid research," she said. "['Oumuamua is] going to have friends."
'Weird' rock

Astronomers have discovered 'Oumuamua resembles worlds in our outer solar system, beyond the orbit of Neptune, which helps shed some light on planetary formation.

'Oumuamua, for example, has a significant carbon content. Astronomers believe that carbon-rich material, together with cosmic ray bombardment, should colour an object like an asteroid bright red.

But this didn't happen with 'Oumuamua.

"This object has been travelling between stars for millions, perhaps billions of years, so it would have had a lot of cosmic bombardment," Bannister said. "So [you'd expect] maybe it would be ultra-red. But it's not."

Instead, the colour is a more neutral red, similar to what you'd find on objects in the Kuiper Belt — the outer region of our solar system, home to icy worlds — such as Pluto and its largest moon Charon.

Image
Quote:
The moon Charon is seen here in a mosaic of photographs taken by the New Horizons spacecraft during its approach to the system from July 7-14, 2016. A study found that Pluto is constantly 'spray-painting' Charon's poles red due to its escaping atmosphere and a reaction with solar radiation. (NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute via AP)




http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/oumua ... -1.4454180


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Montreal Canadiens
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 33280
PostPosted: Tue Jan 02, 2018 1:26 pm
 


Lorry-sized asteroid that Nasa only spotted six days ago is set to make a 'close' approach with Earth in HOURS

Asteroid 2017 YD7 will travel past at 1,300,000 miles (2,000,000km) away
Asteroids are 'hazardous' if they come within 4,600,000 miles (7,403,00km)
It is expected to hurtle past at speeds of over 23,500mph (37,800kmh)


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/ ... z533puul4Z



Poor Thanos, a million miles away, and he gets screwed.. again :lol:


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Wed Jan 03, 2018 7:29 pm
 


Quote:
From the Earth, Moon and Beyond

This composite image of the Earth and Moon is made from data captured by OSIRIS-REx's MapCam instrument on Oct. 2, 2017, when the spacecraft was approximately 3 million miles (5 million kilometers) from Earth, about 13 times the distance between the Earth and Moon. (Click here to see the geometry of the shot.) Three images (different color wavelengths) were combined and color-corrected to make the composite, and the Moon was “stretched” (brightened) to make it more easily visible.

Image



https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/from ... and-beyond


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:05 am
 


Quote:
SpaceX releases close up images of Falcon Heavy’s launch pad debut

SpaceX has released the first close-up images and video of the Falcon Heavy rocket at launch complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The rocket was rolled out on December 28, 2017 and raised vertical on the launch pad. It was lowered and returned to its hangar the following day. The Falcon Heavy will return to the launch pad soon for a static test fire of its 27 first stage engines, with its maiden flight planned later in the month

Image



https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/01/03/s ... pad-debut/

For those not steeped in Space trivia, Launch pad 39a was where most of the Apollo missions launched from, including Apollo 11, and most of the Shuttle missions launched from.

Falcon Heavy will be the most powerful launch vehicle, by more than double the current Proton M and Delta V Heavy rockets.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Boston Bruins


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 11964
PostPosted: Thu Jan 04, 2018 7:10 am
 


Nice posts DrC. This is pretty much the only thread I pay attention to on this site. [B-o]


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Calgary Flames
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 26062
PostPosted: Sat Jan 06, 2018 10:48 pm
 


RIP John Young, who walked on the moon and piloted the first shuttle mission. :(

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/obit-john- ... -1.4476412

Image

Quote:
Legendary astronaut John Young, who walked on the moon and later commanded the first space shuttle flight, has died, NASA said Saturday. Young was 87.

The space agency said Young died Friday night at home in Houston following complications from pneumonia.

NASA called Young one of its pioneers — the only agency astronaut to go into space as part of the Gemini, Apollo and space shuttle programs, and the first to fly into space six times. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon.

"Astronaut John Young's storied career spanned three generations of spaceflight," NASA administrator Robert Lightfoot said in an emailed statement. "John was one of that group of early space pioneers whose bravery and commitment sparked our nation's first great achievements in space."

Young was the only spaceman to span NASA's Gemini, Apollo and shuttle programs, and became the first person to rocket away from Earth six times. Counting his takeoff from the moon in 1972 as commander of Apollo 16, his blastoff tally stood at seven, for decades a world record.

He flew twice during the two-man Gemini missions of the mid-1960s, twice to the moon during NASA's Apollo program, and twice more aboard the new space shuttle Columbia in the early 1980s.

His NASA career lasted 42 years, longer than any other astronaut's, and he was revered among his peers for his dogged dedication to keeping crews safe — and his outspokenness in challenging the space agency's status quo.

Chastened by the 1967 Apollo launch pad fire that killed three astronauts, Young spoke up after the 1986 shuttle Challenger launch accident. His hard scrutiny continued well past shuttle Columbia's disintegration during re-entry in 2003.

"Whenever and wherever I found a potential safety issue, I always did my utmost to make some noise about it, by memo or whatever means might best bring attention to it," Young wrote in his 2012 memoir, Forever Young.

He said he wrote a "mountain of memos" between the two shuttle accidents to "hit people over the head." Such practice bordered on heresy at NASA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, who orbited the moon in 1969 as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked its surface, considered Young "the memo-writing champion of the astronaut office." Young kept working at Johnson Space Center in Houston "long after his compatriots had been put out to pasture or discovered other green fields," Collins wrote in the foreword of Forever Young.

Indeed, Young remained an active astronaut into his early 70s, long after all his peers had left, and held on to his role as NASA's conscience until his retirement in 2004.

"You don't want to be politically correct," he said in a 2000 interview with The Associated Press. "You want to be right."

Young was in NASA's second astronaut class, chosen in 1962, along with the likes of Armstrong, Pete Conrad and James Lovell.


Image

Young was mentioned too in the end radio-talk in Rush's immortal song "Countdown".



Losing these giants, from the days when the great old dreams were still real and belonged to all of us instead of just to the wealthiest and greediest, really hurts. They can't ever be replaced, certainly not in the era of increasing dystopia and disintegration that the very worst among of us has unleashed to ruin everything that was good.


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 11:44 am
 


Quote:
High Above Jupiter's Clouds

NASA's Juno spacecraft was a little more than one Earth diameter from Jupiter when it captured this mind-bending, color-enhanced view of the planet's tumultuous atmosphere.

Jupiter completely fills the image, with only a hint of the terminator (where daylight fades to night) in the upper right corner, and no visible limb (the curved edge of the planet).

Juno took this image of colorful, turbulent clouds in Jupiter's northern hemisphere on Dec. 16, 2017 at 9:43 a.m. PST (12:43 p.m. EST) from 8,292 miles (13,345 kilometers) above the tops of Jupiter's clouds, at a latitude of 48.9 degrees.

The spatial scale in this image is 5.8 miles/pixel (9.3 kilometers/pixel).

Image



https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/galleries/ ... ers-clouds


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 10993
PostPosted: Mon Jan 08, 2018 1:02 pm
 


That image of Jupiter is so beautiful!


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Toronto Maple Leafs


GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 10085
PostPosted: Tue Jan 09, 2018 11:33 am
 


Riding the booster





Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:21 am
 


Quote:
Ice cliffs spotted on Mars

For more than a decade, Colin Dundas, a geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey in Flagstaff, Arizona, has had a daily routine: inspecting a dozen or so high-resolution images beamed back every day from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). A few years ago, something surprising popped out from the planet’s sea of rust: a pale sliver of blue.

What Dundas saw that day, and subsequently found at seven other sites, are steep cliffs, up to 100 meters tall, that expose what appears to be nearly pure ice. The discovery points to large stores of underground ice buried only a meter or two below the surface at surprisingly low martian latitudes. “This kind of ice is more widespread than previously thought,” says Dundas, who, with his co-authors, describes the cliffs this week in Science. Each cliff seems to be the naked face of a glacier, tantalizing scientists with the promise of a layer-cake record of past martian climates and space enthusiasts with a potential resource for future human bases.

Finding ice on Mars is nothing new. Ice covers the poles, and a radar instrument on the MRO has detected signatures of thick, buried ice across the planet’s belly. Some researchers suggested these deposits could be the remnants of glaciers that existed millions of years ago when the planet’s spin axis and orbit were different. But the depth of the ice and whether it exists as relatively pure sheets or as granules frozen in the pore spaces of martian soil have been uncertain.

Image



http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/01/ ... otted-mars


Offline
Forum Addict
Forum Addict
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 927
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:28 am
 


^ bottom of the ocean, cut and paste, change color filters


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 8:54 am
 


CharlesAnthony wrote:
^ bottom of the ocean, cut and paste, change color filters


ROTFL

You'll believe that, but you won't believe when the exact same imaging techniques are used to obtain a photo around another planet? That's why you can't be taken too seriously.


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 28922
PostPosted: Fri Jan 12, 2018 10:25 am
 


Quote:
Researchers catch supermassive black hole burping—twice

A team led by CU Boulder researchers has caught a supermassive black hole in a distant galaxy snacking on gas and then "burping"—not once, but twice.

CU Boulder Assistant Professor Julie Comerford, who led the study, said the supermassive black hole under study appears to have belched – essentially blasting out jets of bright light from the gas it inhaled—two times over the course of about 100,000 years. While astronomers have predicted such objects can flicker on and off as a result of gas feeding events, this is one of the few times one has been caught in the act.

Supermassive black holes—which are millions of times heavier than our sun and are believed to be at the heart of virtually every galaxy—are like regular black holes in basic ways: Regions with such strong gravitational effects that nothing, not even light, can escape. But when the areas around supermassive black holes emit light stemming from feeding episodes, they are known as quasars, said Comerford of CU Boulder's Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences.

"We are seeing this object feast, burp and nap, and then feast, burp and nap once again, which theory had predicted," she said. "Fortunately, we happened to observe this galaxy in a moment where we could clearly see both events."

Image



https://phys.org/news/2018-01-supermass ... twice.html


Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 2099 posts ]  Previous  1 ... 118  119  120  121  122  123  124 ... 140  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest




 
     
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner.
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © Canadaka.net. Powered by © phpBB.