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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:52 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
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Milky Way's black hole just flared, growing 75 times as bright for a few hours

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Four images from the paper. Over about a 2 hour period, Sgr A* flared to 75 times normal, and twice as bright as any other observed peak. At first, astronomers thought they were looking at the S star SO-2. Credit: Do et al; 2019.


Even though the black hole at the center of the Milky Way is a monster, it's still rather quiet. Called Sagittarius A*, it's about 4.6 million times more massive than the sun. Usually, it's a brooding behemoth. But scientists observing Sgr. A* with the Keck Telescope just observed its brightness blooming to over 75 times normal for a few hours.

The flaring is not visible in optical light. It's all happening in the near-infrared, the portion of the infrared spectrum closest to optical light. Astronomers have been watching Sgr. A* for 20 years, and though the black hole does have some variability in its output, this flaring event is like nothing astronomers have observed before. This peak was over twice as bright as the previous peak flux level.

These results are being reported in the Astrophysical Journal Letters in a paper titled "Unprecedented variability of Sgr A* in NIR," and is available at the prepress site arXiv.org. The lead author is Tuan Do, an astronomer at UCLA.

The team saw Sgr. A* flaring at 75 times normal for a two-hour period on May 13th. At first, astronomer Tuan Do thought that they were seeing a star called SO-2 rather than Sgr. A*. SO-2 is one of a group of stars called S-stars that orbits the black hole closely. Astronomers have been keeping an eye on it as it orbits the black hole.

Here's a timelapse of images over 2.5 hr from May from @keckobservatory of the supermassive black hole Sgr A*. The black hole is always variable, but this was the brightest we've seen in the infrared so far. It was probably even brighter before we started observing that night! pic.twitter.com/MwXioZ7twV
— Tuan Do (@quantumpenguin) August 11, 2019



https://phys.org/news/2019-08-milky-bla ... right.html


Oh come on the Black Hole farted and now scientist are letting the whole world know. How embarrassing for the Black Hole. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:53 am
 


I blame global warming.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:53 am
 


What a waste of my 29,000th post. :cry:


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:56 am
 


Humour is never a waste. ;)


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:57 am
 


raydan wrote:
What a waste of my 29,000th post. :cry:


I will expect a far better 30,000th post from you. We all will be watching. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:58 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Humour is never a waste. ;)


But as we have seen in the threads here it can be wasted on certain people.


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:08 pm
 


stratos wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
Humour is never a waste. ;)


But as we have seen in the threads here it can be wasted on certain people.


Anyone who doesn't get humour, aren't "people". ;)


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 14, 2019 12:15 pm
 


[B-o]


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 16, 2019 10:22 am
 


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An Astrophotographer Noticed a Chunk of Ice Orbiting Comet 67P in Rosetta’s Photos

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The European Space Agency’s (ESA) Rosetta mission spent two years at the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. At the end of September 2016, its mission was ended when the spacecraft was sent on a collision course into the comet. During its time at comet 67P, it captured a vast amount of images.

The ESA made all those images freely available at their Rosetta website, and now an astro-photographer working with those images has found something interesting: a chunk of ice travelling through space with 67P.

The amateur astronomer who did the sleuthing is Jacint Roger from Spain. (Roger’s work is pretty cool. Check it out.)

Roger created a gif from a series of processed Rosetta images, and the gif brought 67P’s icy companion into focus.



https://www.universetoday.com/143170/an ... as-photos/


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2019 11:26 am
 


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Eight new repeating fast radio bursts detected

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Using the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) telescope, astronomers have identified eight new repeating fast radio burst (FRB) sources. The finding, reported in a paper published August 9 on arXiv.org, could shed new light on the origin and nature of these mysterious phenomena.

FRBs are intense bursts of radio emission lasting milliseconds and showcasing characteristic dispersion sweep of radio pulsars. The physical nature of these bursts is yet unknown, and astronomers consider a variety of explanations ranging from synchrotron maser emission from young magnetars in supernova remnants to cosmic string cusps.

The first FRB was discovered in 2007. Known as the Lorimer Burst, the bursts was a singular event such as a supernova. Five years later, the first repeating FRB was detected. Named FRB 121102, the source exhibits complex burst morphology, sub-burst downward frequency drifts, and also complex pulse phenomenology.

Although dozens of FRBs have been identified to date, only two of them were found to repeat their signals. These repeaters could be the key to resolving the mysteries of FRBs as astronomers anticipating the upcoming bursts can prepare extensive follow-up observational campaigns aimed at investigating such flashes in detail.

Now, a team of astronomers led by Bridget C. Andersen of McGill University in Montreal, Canada, reports the detection of eight new FRB repeaters, which could mean a breakthrough in studies of these flaring events.



https://phys.org/news/2019-08-fast-radio.html

"explanations ranging from synchrotron maser emission from young magnetars in supernova remnants to cosmic string cusps"

I love articles that I have to look things like that up to understand the sentence. :)


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2019 12:38 pm
 




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PostPosted: Mon Aug 19, 2019 12:55 pm
 


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I love articles that I have to look things like that up to understand the sentence.


Then you most love almost all my post. XD


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 5:03 am
 


Not sure what you are trying to say . . . [huh]


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 6:56 am
 


Most of what I write has people doing [huh]


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2019 7:28 am
 


I'm messing with you man. ;)


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