CKA Forums
Login 
canadian forums
bottom
 
 
Canadian Forums

Author Topic Options
Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Wed Feb 08, 2012 10:48 pm
 


Image

Enceladus is spectacular!


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 5:37 pm
 


8O Eta Carinae


Attachments:
625816main_supernova1_1024_946-710.jpg
625816main_supernova1_1024_946-710.jpg [ 72 KiB | Viewed 123 times ]
Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Sun Feb 26, 2012 7:35 pm
 


Dione and Saturn

Image


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
Profile
Posts: 12349
PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:15 pm
 


Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson on the space program's economic value: innovation. Brilliant, and you conservatives will thoroughly enjoy seeing a guy make Bill Maher eat his words.



Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 9:48 pm
 


Lemmy Lemmy:
Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson on the space program's economic value: innovation. Brilliant, and you conservatives will thoroughly enjoy seeing a guy make Bill Maher eat his words.



One doesn't need to be a conservative to wan to see Mahar taken down a peg or ten.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Mon Mar 05, 2012 10:08 pm
 


$1:
Cassini Detects Hint of Fresh Air at Dione03.02.12

This view highlights tectonic faults and craters on Dione, an icy world that has undoubtedly experienced geologic activity since its formation.

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has "sniffed" molecular oxygen ions around Saturn's icy moon Dione for the first time, confirming the presence of a very tenuous atmosphere. The oxygen ions are quite sparse – one for every 0.67 cubic inches of space (one for every 11 cubic centimeters of space) or about 2,550 per cubic foot (90,000 per cubic meter) – show that Dione has an extremely thin neutral atmosphere.

At the Dione surface, this atmosphere would only be as dense as Earth's atmosphere 300 miles (480 kilometers) above the surface. The detection of this faint atmosphere, known as an exosphere, is described in a recent issue of the journal Geophysical Research Letters.

"We now know that Dione, in addition to Saturn's rings and the moon Rhea, is a source of oxygen molecules," said Robert Tokar, a Cassini team member based at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, N.M., and the lead author of the paper. "This shows that molecular oxygen is actually common in the Saturn system and reinforces that it can come from a process that doesn't involve life."

Dione's oxygen appears to derive from either solar photons or energetic particles from space bombarding the moon's water ice surface and liberating oxygen molecules, Tokar said. But scientists will be looking for other processes, including geological ones, that could also explain the oxygen.

"Scientists weren't even sure Dione would be big enough to hang on to an exosphere, but this new research shows that Dione is even more interesting than we previously thought," said Amanda Hendrix, Cassini deputy project scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., who was not directly involved in the study. "Scientists are now digging through Cassini data on Dione to look at this moon in more detail."

Several solid solar system bodies – including Earth, Venus, Mars and Saturn's largest moon Titan – have atmospheres. But they tend to be typically much denser than what has been found around Dione. However, Cassini scientists did detect a thin exosphere around Saturn's moon Rhea in 2010, very similar to Dione. The density of oxygen at the surfaces of Dione and Rhea is around 5 trillion times less dense than that at Earth's surface.

Tokar said scientists suspected molecular oxygen would exist at Dione because NASA's Hubble Space Telescope detected ozone. But they didn't know for sure until Cassini was able to measure ionized molecular oxygen on its second flyby of Dione on April 7, 2010 with the Cassini plasma spectrometer. On that flyby, the spacecraft flew within about 313 miles (503 kilometers) of the moon's surface.

Cassini scientists are also analyzing data from Cassini's ion and neutral mass spectrometer from a very close flyby on Dec. 12, 2011. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer made the detection of Rhea's thin atmosphere, so scientists will be able to compare Cassini data from the two moons and see if there are other molecules in Dione's exosphere.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency, and the Italian Space Agency. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter was designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The Cassini plasma spectrometer team and the ion and neutral mass spectrometer team are based at Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio.

For more information about the mission, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/cassini and http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov .


Attachments:
627611main_pia07691-43_946-710.jpg
627611main_pia07691-43_946-710.jpg [ 53.92 KiB | Viewed 116 times ]
Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 45143
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 12:11 pm
 


That's ^^ actually a bigger deal than it seems. Oxygen doesn't normally appear naturally, it's too reactive and ends up oxydizing otther things.

If plant life didn't evolve here, there would be no oxygen in our atmosphere.


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 25784
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 1:21 pm
 


Gunnair Gunnair:
Lemmy Lemmy:
Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson on the space program's economic value: innovation. Brilliant, and you conservatives will thoroughly enjoy seeing a guy make Bill Maher eat his words.



One doesn't need to be a conservative to wan to see Mahar taken down a peg or ten.


Hear! Hear! [B-o]


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 25784
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 1:25 pm
 


DrCaleb DrCaleb:
That's ^^ actually a bigger deal than it seems. Oxygen doesn't normally appear naturally, it's too reactive and ends up oxydizing otther things.

If plant life didn't evolve here, there would be no oxygen in our atmosphere.


Half true:

A War We Need

Half of the o2 we breath comes from the ocean, not actually plants.


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 45143
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 4:01 pm
 


Scape Scape:
DrCaleb DrCaleb:
That's ^^ actually a bigger deal than it seems. Oxygen doesn't normally appear naturally, it's too reactive and ends up oxydizing otther things.

If plant life didn't evolve here, there would be no oxygen in our atmosphere.


Half true:

A War We Need

Half of the o2 we breath comes from the ocean, not actually plants.


I've always thought Phytoplankton are plants. ?!?


Offline
CKA Moderator
CKA Moderator
 Vancouver Canucks
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 25784
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 9:44 pm
 


Umm... oops?

Got it in my head you were talking trees...


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 10:03 pm
 


DrCaleb and Scape arguing science points.



:lol:


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 10:25 pm
 


$1:
Mid-Size Asteroid Won't Hit Earth in 2013, NASA Says

Despite feverish speculation from doomsayers, the near-Earth asteroid 2012 DA14 won't slam into our planet next year, NASA researchers say.

The asteroid, which astronomers estimate to be about 150 feet (45 meters) across, will give Earth an uncomfortably close shave on Feb. 15, 2013, coming nearer to our planet than the satellites we've lofted to geostationary orbit. But 2012 DA14 poses no real impact danger on that pass, according to NASA scientists.

"Its orbit about the sun can bring it no closer to the Earth's surface than 3.2 Earth radii on February 15, 2013," researchers with the Near-Earth Object Program Office, at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., wrote in an update today (March 6).

One Earth radius is roughly 3,963 miles (6,378 kilometers) at the equator. So by this reckoning, the nearest 2012 DA14 can get to us next year is 12,680 miles (20,406 km).

Introducing Galaxy Nexus google.ca/nexusSimple, Beautiful, Beyond Smart Now with Android 4.0"Shocking" 2012 Horoscope www.PremiumAstrology.comWhat Does 2012 Have In Store For You? Shockingly Accurate. See Free!Brain Training Games www.lumosity.comImprove memory with scientifically designed brain exercises.Ads by Google
For comparison, satellites in geosynchronous orbit circle our planet at an altitude of 22,245 miles (35,800 km). Other satellites orbit much lower. The International Space Station, for example, flies at around 240 miles (386 km) above the planet.

2012 DA14 was discovered late last month by astronomers at the La Sagra Observatory in southern Spain. Its path around the sun is roughly similar to that of Earth, and it makes relatively close approaches to our planet twice per orbit.

Calculations show that the space rock came within about 1.5 million miles (2.5 million km) this past Feb. 16, or about six times the distance from Earth to the moon.

Next February's much closer encounter has ignited something of a media firestorm, with various outlets publishing stories with headlines such as "Incoming! Asteroid 2012 DA14" and "Tunguska-Sized Asteroid Homing on Earth."

This latter article is referring to the 1908 "Tunguska event," in which a comet or meteoroid exploded above the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in Siberia, flattening about 500,000 acres (2,000 square km) of forest.

While 2012 DA14 won't slam into us next February, humanity needs to remain vigilant against the asteroid threat, many researchers say. Huge impacts are a part of our planet's history, after all; one wiped out the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, and it's just a matter of time before another big space rock lines Earth up in its sights, astronomers say.


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 10:39 pm
 


Asteroid Itokawa

Image

Image

http://www.jaxa.jp/article/special/hayabusa_sp3/index_e.html


Offline
CKA Uber
CKA Uber
 Vancouver Canucks


GROUP_AVATAR

GROUP_AVATAR
User avatar
Profile
Posts: 23565
PostPosted: Tue Mar 06, 2012 11:01 pm
 




Post new topic  Reply to topic  [ 3201 posts ]  Previous  1  2  3  4  5  6 ... 214  Next



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests



cron
 
     
All logos and trademarks in this site are property of their respective owner.
The comments are property of their posters, all the rest © Canadaka.net. Powered by © phpBB.