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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 9:36 am
 


Bad news for Canada's oil sands and Keystone XL? .......

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... erica.html

Seems to me that developments like this might reduce the impetus for importing Canadian oil.

Regardless of which way they turn, environmentalists must be having fits.

Energy-hungry Americans must be pleased that new options are opening a scenario in which, whether it's Canadian oil or American oil, they can reduce their dependency on importing oil from countries with which they don't like to do business.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 2:16 pm
 


I'm not too worried - but the Saudis and Venezualans probably should be...

Quote:
“Canadian oil is faring well from a market-share perspective but not faring well from a price perspective,” Peter Tertzakian, chief energy economist and managing director at ARC Financial Corp. in Calgary, said in a telephone interview.

Total U.S. crude oil imports declined 16% from a 2005 peak of 10.1 million barrels a day, EIA data show. The share of imports from Canada has increased by 775,000 barrels per day to 2.4 million barrels per day (28% of total U.S. imports) over the same period, the agency said in a weekly oil market review published Wednesday.

Up to 3.5 million barrels a day of Canadian exports could still find a home in the U.S. market as the rapid growth of tight oil plays begins to taper, Mr. Mark said.
“I don’t think the U.S. growth will continue at the rapid clip it has in the last two years,” he said. “There are some laws of diminishing returns on these plays. You pick the low-hanging fruit first and then as those production numbers get higher and higher it’s harder to grow at the same rate.”


http://www.edmontonjournal.com/business ... story.html


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:40 pm
 


Here's an interesting article re: oil moving by train... to New Brunswick...

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/trains-carryin ... nance.html

Quote:
PORTLAND, Maine - Millions of gallons of crude oil from the nation's heartland are crossing Maine in railroad tank cars bound for a Canadian oil refinery, raising concern among environmentalists and state officials about the threat of an accident and spill.

The oil is primarily coming from the Bakken shale-oil field in North Dakota, with lesser amounts from neighbouring Canada, where oil production has boomed in recent years. Trains carried nearly 5.3 million barrels of the light crude — more than 220 million gallons — across the state and into New Brunswick last year, and the volume is growing.

Railroads that operate in Maine say the increased business has resulted in more jobs and investment in the state. Moving oil by train is perfectly safe, railroad officials say, with upgraded tracks and modern tank cars.

"The statistics tell you how much has been transported (in Maine), but to the best of my knowledge, there hasn't been any spilled or released," said Robert Grindrod, president and chief executive of Hermon-based Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway Ltd., which carried nearly 3 million barrels of oil across Maine last year.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 4:44 pm
 


Grew up beside ND in Manitoba. Its Boom Town USA. Remember driving through Williston, ND last year while visiting home. Holy smokes has the whole area EXPLODED.

Towns doubling. Tons of temporary workers. The oil boom is very huge and real there...


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 5:46 pm
 


Jonny_C wrote:
Bad news for Canada's oil sands and Keystone XL? .......

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... erica.html

Seems to me that developments like this might reduce the impetus for importing Canadian oil.

Regardless of which way they turn, environmentalists must be having fits.

Energy-hungry Americans must be pleased that new options are opening a scenario in which, whether it's Canadian oil or American oil, they can reduce their dependency on importing oil from countries with which they don't like to do business.


This oil has the new "F"racking word associated with it.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:01 pm
 


So I guess that Canada's dirty oil from the sands is a no-no, but their own dirty oil is OK. [huh]


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:14 pm
 


No, there are lots of protests against fracking too. Just harder to stop when approval only needs to be given on the local level. I do wonder how they will transport all this new oil tho.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:18 pm
 


andyt wrote:
No, there are lots of protests against fracking too. Just harder to stop when approval only needs to be given on the local level. I do wonder how they will transport all this new oil tho.

From what I've heard, most of it from ND is by train.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 24, 2013 8:23 pm
 


Alta_redneck wrote:
This oil has the new "F"racking word associated with it.


That sure doesn't seem to be putting the brakes on it. It looks like full speed ahead.

raydan wrote:
andyt wrote:
No, there are lots of protests against fracking too. Just harder to stop when approval only needs to be given on the local level. I do wonder how they will transport all this new oil tho.

From what I've heard, most of it from ND is by train.


I'm frankly surprised by how much is already moving by train. I used to think that rail transportation of crude would be too expensive.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 9:46 am
 


Jonny_C wrote:
I'm frankly surprised by how much is already moving by train. I used to think that rail transportation of crude would be too expensive.


When compared to pipelines, it is more expensive (and not as safe). There is already talk of trains going through BC to export Alberta crude;

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe-in ... cle563560/

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/11/21 ... 70781.html

http://news.nationalpost.com/2013/01/02 ... ort-crude/


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:03 am
 


westmanguy wrote:
Grew up beside ND in Manitoba. Its Boom Town USA. Remember driving through Williston, ND last year while visiting home. Holy smokes has the whole area EXPLODED.

Towns doubling. Tons of temporary workers. The oil boom is very huge and real there...


One of my friends has a husband in the North Dakota oil business and says there's more work there then they can handle. His company alone wants to hire as many as 18,000 workers.

They offered me a job paying a ridiculous amount of money but the downside is that you get to live in a trailer. In the winter and summer. In North Dakota.

I'd sooner go back to Iraq.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:23 am
 


BartSimpson wrote:
westmanguy wrote:
Grew up beside ND in Manitoba. Its Boom Town USA. Remember driving through Williston, ND last year while visiting home. Holy smokes has the whole area EXPLODED.

Towns doubling. Tons of temporary workers. The oil boom is very huge and real there...


One of my friends has a husband in the North Dakota oil business and says there's more work there then they can handle. His company alone wants to hire as many as 18,000 workers.

They offered me a job paying a ridiculous amount of money but the downside is that you get to live in a trailer. In the winter and summer. In North Dakota.

I'd sooner go back to Iraq.


Sounds a lot like working in the oilpatch in Fort McMurray...


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:30 am
 


bootlegga wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
westmanguy wrote:
Grew up beside ND in Manitoba. Its Boom Town USA. Remember driving through Williston, ND last year while visiting home. Holy smokes has the whole area EXPLODED.

Towns doubling. Tons of temporary workers. The oil boom is very huge and real there...


One of my friends has a husband in the North Dakota oil business and says there's more work there then they can handle. His company alone wants to hire as many as 18,000 workers.

They offered me a job paying a ridiculous amount of money but the downside is that you get to live in a trailer. In the winter and summer. In North Dakota.

I'd sooner go back to Iraq.


Sounds a lot like working in the oilpatch in Fort McMurray...


Living in a trailer in McMurray would be a step up.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:38 am
 


Jonny_C wrote:
I'm frankly surprised by how much is already moving by train. I used to think that rail transportation of crude would be too expensive.

It's the only option, and prices are high enough that rail transportation is still profitable. A pipeline would be much safer and much more efficient, but pipelines are evil.
BartSimpson wrote:
They offered me a job paying a ridiculous amount of money but the downside is that you get to live in a trailer. In the winter and summer. In North Dakota.

I'd sooner go back to Iraq.

As a Montana native, living in North Dakota has appeal, but paying $2000 a month for a studio apartment in a boom town with inadequate infrastructure and a 70% drunken male population has no appeal.


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 25, 2013 10:49 am
 


DanSC wrote:
As a Montana native, living in North Dakota has appeal, but paying $2000 a month for a studio apartment in a boom town with inadequate infrastructure and a 70% drunken male population has no appeal.


Ditto that.


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