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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 9:28 am
 


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In Alberta, it was almost unknown.

Though legal here, bear baiting is barely heard of outside of hunting circles — or it was, until Vancouver Canucks forward David Booth started bragging this month about killing an Alberta bruin.

“In Alberta trying to kill a few bruins. #unleashthefury” and “Just killed a Chara sized bruin! 7ft black bear - 21in skull” were the tweets that triggered raised eyebrows and a war of words in this province.

Booth’s fame spread the boasting far beyond the hunting community, and when Booth thumbed his nose at disgusted critics by posting a full video of the unsportsmanlike kill, the debate exploded.

It wasn’t the hunting, but the method that most objected to.

People called out the $4.5-million NHL star for taking part in a killing condemned by many as a cowardly, and lazy style of hunting — if sitting in a tree really counts as hunting.

Outlawed in B.C. and banned in 18 of the 26 American states where bear hunting is allowed, bear baiting upsets many because the bear is distracted by an unnatural food supply and then ambushed.

Opponents aren’t just left-wing animal rights activists, as some in the hunting community like to pretend.

Like Pollard, many hunters loathe the practice, too.

“I would hope it’s a matter of time until it’s stopped everywhere,” said Pollard, who scoffs at the notion bear baiting is the only way to ensure a clean kill.

“Wait until the berries are ripe — that’s a pretty good way to hunt them.”

Those who support the practice, which in Booth’s case meant waiting near a bait of oats, molassess and meat, say it ensures sows and cubs aren’t killed because the shooter gets a good look first.

Those who call it unsporting say good hunters do that anyway — and it teaches bears to depend on humans for food while robbing real sportsmen of animals that no longer roam and forage.

The biggest issue though, among hunters and non-hunters, is the fish-in-a-barrel outcome.

“To me shooting any animal over a bait is unethical, at least in a sporting context,” wrote one hunter on an Alberta outdoor forum, where many have debated the issue.

“It gives an unfair advantage to the hunter and assuming the hunter has some minimum level of skill the outcome is somewhat certain.”

In Alberta at least, there’s little the new awareness will do to change the current rules, despite calls from angry citizens outraged over Booth’s smug bragging.

Dave Ealy, spokesman for Alberta Sustainable Resource Development, says with 40,000 black bears in Alberta, all styles of hunting are needed to keep the bear population under control.

“Our main concern is that the kill is made as humanely as possible,” said Ealy. “As to what’s fair, we have hunters out there with greater ability than others.”

Meanwhile, in Michigan, Booth’s family is questioning how fair the attacks on David have been, given that his hunt was perfectly legal. “No one is able to decide whether it’s right or not, and provinces and states have been debating this for years,” said Michael Booth, David’s father.

David himself is laying low, not falling for the bait of defending his actions in public.

Booth’s dad says his NHL star son shouldn’t have to. “What he was doing was legal — what’s happened since seems not quite fair. It shouldn’t be a story.”

It wouldn’t be, if Booth wasn’t so proud of his questionable kill.


Hmmm baiting a bear that hasn't ate in 6 months, yea that's sporting. I remember years ago a young fella I worked with rolled into work one morning with a dead steer in the back of his pick up, I said WTF, " it's bait I'm going bear hunting" he said.

That was back in the 80's, I couldn't believe was legal then and I can't believe it's still legal now.

There's a video here , I didn't take the time to watch it.

http://www.edmontonsun.com/2012/05/17/w ... g-province


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 10:23 am
 


I suppose it does seem brutal to those who don't understand it. Black bears are not a threatened species, except when they break into your home and have to be destroyed needlessly.

You sit in a tree, and watch dozens of bears feed off your bait for several days. You wait those days, looking for the 'perfect' bear. Old. Wise. A good sense of smell and the smarts to have lived nearly his expected lifetime. Not easy to lure in. One that will kill cubs if he finds them, reducing the overall population. When you take him, it's an instant kill. No suffering.

Or, you can walk the forest searching for a bear. You stumble on a two year old cow, with cubs and she charges you. And you have to destroy a new mother and make orphans of her new cubs.

Which is more humane?

There is also other alternatives, like:

http://www.vancouversun.com/news/albert ... story.html

Incidently, there was a large, years long study into the spring bear hunt, and it's findings are sure to upset alarmists:

http://www.innovationalberta.com/articl ... icleid=109

(PDF link)

http://www.huntingfortomorrow.com/HFTF_ ... t%2008.pdf


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 10:27 am
 


Why would you want to kill an old bear - how's the meat on that thing? People who hunt bear should be made to eat every last bit of it.

Sure glad we outlawed it in BC.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 10:41 am
 


andyt wrote:
Why would you want to kill an old bear - how's the meat on that thing? People who hunt bear should be made to eat every last bit of it.

Sure glad we outlawed it in BC.


We do. Being fattier than most meats, it's perfect for sausage and salamis. Mixed with moose and pork, it's heaven! If the hunter doesn't take it, most outfitters make sure it goes to first nations people, or someone who will eat it.

Have fun with all the urban bears! You have zero chance against a 7 foot bear that can run down a horse and responds well to the 'fleeing prey' motions of someone on a bicycle. You think the rise in bear/human conflict in provinces/states that have outlawed a bear hunt is coincidence?

Read Sophie Czetwertynski's report.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 10:43 am
 


We haven't outlawed the bear hunt. Just one form of doing it. I have no problem with hunting bears for meat, not so big on people who just want to kill something or want the fur only.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 10:47 am
 


andyt wrote:
We haven't outlawed the bear hunt. Just one form of doing it. I have no problem with hunting bears for meat, not so big on people who just want to kill something or want the fur only.


I've got no problem with some tourist hunter who just wants the experience of hunting the bear, so long as it's done responsibly and not wasted. There are limits on how many and where bears are taken, and the hunter-tourist doesn't change those limits, but brings money and therefore jobs with them.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 11:02 am
 


Bear hunters are local heros to people who live in bush land Saskatchewan . For a few years we had an outfitter near us who brought Yanks up each spring. Our bear problem went down. Now he is gone and the bears are wandering about in our yards again. The REALLY good thing was when they were hunting the bears associated people with "bang, I'm a rug. ". Less so now.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 11:30 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:

You sit in a tree, and watch dozens of bears feed off your bait for several days. You wait those days, looking for the 'perfect' bear. Old. Wise. A good sense of smell and the smarts to have lived nearly his expected lifetime. Not easy to lure in. One that will kill cubs if he finds them, reducing the overall population. When you take him, it's an instant kill. No suffering.



Sound pretty boring.

And not natural. The bear you describe is going to have prime DNA, and would not be killed by natural selection. His killing cubs is to allow him to mate with the sow, pass on his DNA. It may seem brutal to some, but has worked for bears for millennia. Killing a prime specimen like this just harms the bear population. Same as trophy hunting for Bighorn is reducing the size of horns on the males - unnatural selection.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 11:44 am
 


andyt wrote:
Sure glad we outlawed it in BC.


Baiting was outlawed in BC because of the Grizzly Bear. It's far too dangerous for the hunter to bait in Griz country. You can't legally shoot a Grizzly in BC, without a limited entry draw tag, so it's not a great idea to bait one of them big fella's in. Many places in Alberta it's not legal either, primarily because of that same fact, too many Griz. Baiting is legal in many Provinces.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 12:51 pm
 


As far as I see it, if someone is hunting bear primarily for the meat and maybe a rug as well, they should be allowed to hunt it anyway they want using any weapon they want as long as it is legal. I'm not into bear baiting but it does have it's merits as it will allow one to pick and choose the bear they want, if they have the patience to wait for the right one to come along. As for those who want to trophy hunt Griz or even Blackies they should only be allowed to use a muzzle loader or a bow with no baiting allowed. At least that way it would be more of a sport, not just sitting back 200 yards in a blind with their .458 or .375 H&H Magnums sipping on their lattes.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 12:54 pm
 


Hyack wrote:
As far as I see it, if someone is hunting bear primarily for the meat and maybe a rug as well, they should be allowed to hunt it anyway they want using any weapon they want as long as it is legal. I'm not into bear baiting but it does have it's merits as it will allow one to pick and choose the bear they want, if they have the patience to wait for the right one to come along. As for those who want to trophy hunt Griz or even Blackies they should only be allowed to use a muzzle loader or a bow with no baiting allowed. At least that way it would be more of a sport, not just sitting back 200 yards in a blind with their .458 or .375 H&H Magnums sipping on their lattes.


That's how I see it too. I bet tho there aren't many people who hunt bear for meat.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 1:03 pm
 


andyt wrote:
Hyack wrote:
As far as I see it, if someone is hunting bear primarily for the meat and maybe a rug as well, they should be allowed to hunt it anyway they want using any weapon they want as long as it is legal. I'm not into bear baiting but it does have it's merits as it will allow one to pick and choose the bear they want, if they have the patience to wait for the right one to come along. As for those who want to trophy hunt Griz or even Blackies they should only be allowed to use a muzzle loader or a bow with no baiting allowed. At least that way it would be more of a sport, not just sitting back 200 yards in a blind with their .458 or .375 H&H Magnums sipping on their lattes.


That's how I see it too. I bet tho there aren't many people who hunt bear for meat.


Not when there are still tasty Deer and Caribou and Moose out there that don't have big claws and teeth and can shred the vehicle you are riding in like it were cloth.


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PostPosted: Thu May 17, 2012 1:06 pm
 


QBC wrote:
andyt wrote:
Sure glad we outlawed it in BC.


Baiting was outlawed in BC because of the Grizzly Bear. It's far too dangerous for the hunter to bait in Griz country. You can't legally shoot a Grizzly in BC, without a limited entry draw tag, so it's not a great idea to bait one of them big fella's in. Many places in Alberta it's not legal either, primarily because of that same fact, too many Griz. Baiting is legal in many Provinces.

They just had to shoot and kill 3 Grizzly's 2 weeks ago because they ate 8 sheep, 50 kms from here... They also sedated and caught one, and transported it to Granby Park... It made me sad... And also a bit scared for the summer, when they are down here already...

But that's kinda off topic... :lol:


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