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PostPosted: Mon Dec 16, 2019 6:27 pm
 


Friend was sent a gift card from her sister in the Southern States. Envelope flap was sealed, but it was empty.
Someone in the US or Canadian Postal service had slit the side and stolen the Visa card.
Bastards!


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 02, 2020 5:49 pm
 


GOP Lawmaker Plotted Insurrections to Establish Christian State

Quote:
Last year, the chair of the Republican caucus in Washington’s state legislature acknowledged that he had written a manifesto on the “Biblical Basis for War.” In that document, the lawmaker argued that – as far as Jesus Christ was concerned – American Christians have the right to “kill all males” who support abortion, same-sex marriage or communism (so long as they first give such infidels the opportunity to renounce their heresies).

The manifesto’s revelation cost its author, Matt Shea, his chairmanship. But Shea insisted that his writings were merely “a summary of church sermons on Old Testament war that could help place current events in historical context.” And so, the Washington GOP did not call for Shea to resign or expel him from its House caucus.

This past spring, the Guardian obtained text messages in which Shea discussed targetting anti-fascist activists for surveillance, harassment, and violence. One of Shea’s interlocutors, online radio personality Jack Robertson, offered this prescription for the treatment of a female antifa protester: “Fist full of hair, and face slam, to a Jersey barrier. Treat em like communist revolutionaries. Then shave her bald with a K-Bar USMC field knife.”

The Republican lawmaker replied, “Ok. What BG [background] checks need to be done. Give me the list.”

The leader of Washington’s House Republicans JT Wilcox called Shea’s participation in this chat “deeply upsetting,” and promised that “My conversations with Matt and the leadership will continue.” But Wilcox did not feel that Shea’s actions required his expulsion from government.
Nevertheless, Shea’s activities – which included working with Robertson on a plan for Eastern Washington to secede and reconstitute as “Liberty State” – concerned prominent conservatives in his corner of rural Washington. Spokane County’s Trump-supporting sheriff, Ozzie Knezovich, had long sounded alarms about Shea’s extremism. Meanwhile, one of Shea’s former supporters, Jay Pounder, supplied the press and state legislature with documents detailing Shea’s plans for establishing a theocratic government in Washington following some unspecified “collapse event.”

All this led Washington’s House of Representatives to commission a report on Shea from a former FBI agent. That report, which was released last week, alleges that Shea “as a leader in the Patriot Movement, planned, engaged in and promoted a total of three armed conflicts of political violence against the United States Government in three states outside the state of Washington over a three-year period.”

Among these was the occupation of Oregon’s Malheur wildlife refuge in 2016. As the Seattle Times reports:

Shea participated in four phone calls with Ammon Bundy in advance of the January 2016 Malheur occupation, the report found. The day after the occupation began, Shea, using the code name Verumbellator, created a detailed military-style plan called Operation Cold Reality that laid out roles and responsibilities for militia members and for an organization that Shea chaired, the Coalition of Western States.

Days later, Shea traveled to Burns, Oregon, the site of the standoff, identified himself as a state representative and met with local and national law enforcement, the report found. He “gathered intelligence” about law enforcement strategies and operations from that meeting and then met with Ammon Bundy and other armed occupiers of the refuge, the report found, despite warnings from law enforcement.

Shea has now been “suspended” from the House Republican caucus, and Wilcox has called for his resignation. But, as of this writing, an alleged practitioner of radical Christian terrorism remains a state legislator in Washington.

Shea’s story demonstrates that even deeply conservative Trump supporters (typically) see a bright line between the president’s brand of politics and those of far-right militias – even if the commander-in-chief sometimes blurs that distinction rhetorically. But it also reflects the fact that there are a large number of “atypical” ultraconservatives in the United States who are inclined to take Donald Trump’s most incendiary rhetoric – and that of Trump’s allies at Fox News – both seriously and literally. When Tucker Carlson informs his viewers that Democrats are plotting a “coup” that will irrevocably disempower white Christian America (by enfranchising undocumented immigrants), or when Laura Ingraham explains that immigrants are turning formerly Republican states into “Petri dish[es] for radical left-wing ideas,” some “Second Amendment people” will follow their paranoid, xenophobic logic to its endpoint.

In September, the president said on Twitter that if Democrats successfully remove him from office, it will cause “a Civil War like fracture.” One of Matt Shea’s allied organizations, the Oath Keepers, approvingly quoted Trump’s tweet.

“This is the truth,” the group wrote. “We ARE on the verge of a HOT civil war. Like in 1859. That’s where we are.”


https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/12/matt-shea-christian-terrorism-washington-report-ammon-bundy.html


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:15 am
 


Quote:
Juul bought ads on CartoonNetwork.com, NickJr.com, other kid sites, suit says

Popular e-cigarette maker Juul intentionally and egregiously tailored its marketing to appeal to underage youth, according to a lawsuit filed by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey on February 12.

The company’s early marketing in 2015 and 2016 purposefully used young, “cool” models in its launch campaign, recruited teen “influencers” on social media, and bought banner and video advertisements on numerous websites aimed at teens and children, including Cartoon Network’s cartoonnetwork.com and Nickelodeon’s sites Nick.com and NickJr.com. Juul even went so far as to give advice to underage consumers over email on how to get around age restrictions to make online purchases of the company's e-cigarettes.

The lawsuit lands as public health officials across the nation are still grappling with an explosion in e-cigarette use by youth, which the Food and Drug Administration has referred to as an “epidemic.” Between 2011 and 2019, recent use of e-cigarettes by middle schoolers increased from 0.6 percent to 10.5 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For high schoolers, use increased from 1.5 percent to 27.5 percent in that timeframe. That means that by 2019, more than 1 in every 4 high school students said they had used e-cigarettes within the last 30-days from the time of the survey.


https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/02 ... suit-says/


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:37 am
 


xerxes wrote:
GOP Lawmaker Plotted Insurrections to Establish Christian State

Quote:
Last year, the chair of the Republican caucus in Washington’s state legislature acknowledged that he had written a manifesto on the “Biblical Basis for War.” In that document, the lawmaker argued that – as far as Jesus Christ was concerned – American Christians have the right to “kill all males” who support abortion, same-sex marriage or communism (so long as they first give such infidels the opportunity to renounce their heresies).

The manifesto’s revelation cost its author, Matt Shea, his chairmanship. But Shea insisted that his writings were merely “a summary of church sermons on Old Testament war that could help place current events in historical context.” And so, the Washington GOP did not call for Shea to resign or expel him from its House caucus.

This past spring, the Guardian obtained text messages in which Shea discussed targetting anti-fascist activists for surveillance, harassment, and violence. One of Shea’s interlocutors, online radio personality Jack Robertson, offered this prescription for the treatment of a female antifa protester: “Fist full of hair, and face slam, to a Jersey barrier. Treat em like communist revolutionaries. Then shave her bald with a K-Bar USMC field knife.”

The Republican lawmaker replied, “Ok. What BG [background] checks need to be done. Give me the list.”

The leader of Washington’s House Republicans JT Wilcox called Shea’s participation in this chat “deeply upsetting,” and promised that “My conversations with Matt and the leadership will continue.” But Wilcox did not feel that Shea’s actions required his expulsion from government.
Nevertheless, Shea’s activities – which included working with Robertson on a plan for Eastern Washington to secede and reconstitute as “Liberty State” – concerned prominent conservatives in his corner of rural Washington. Spokane County’s Trump-supporting sheriff, Ozzie Knezovich, had long sounded alarms about Shea’s extremism. Meanwhile, one of Shea’s former supporters, Jay Pounder, supplied the press and state legislature with documents detailing Shea’s plans for establishing a theocratic government in Washington following some unspecified “collapse event.”

All this led Washington’s House of Representatives to commission a report on Shea from a former FBI agent. That report, which was released last week, alleges that Shea “as a leader in the Patriot Movement, planned, engaged in and promoted a total of three armed conflicts of political violence against the United States Government in three states outside the state of Washington over a three-year period.”

Among these was the occupation of Oregon’s Malheur wildlife refuge in 2016. As the Seattle Times reports:

Shea participated in four phone calls with Ammon Bundy in advance of the January 2016 Malheur occupation, the report found. The day after the occupation began, Shea, using the code name Verumbellator, created a detailed military-style plan called Operation Cold Reality that laid out roles and responsibilities for militia members and for an organization that Shea chaired, the Coalition of Western States.

Days later, Shea traveled to Burns, Oregon, the site of the standoff, identified himself as a state representative and met with local and national law enforcement, the report found. He “gathered intelligence” about law enforcement strategies and operations from that meeting and then met with Ammon Bundy and other armed occupiers of the refuge, the report found, despite warnings from law enforcement.

Shea has now been “suspended” from the House Republican caucus, and Wilcox has called for his resignation. But, as of this writing, an alleged practitioner of radical Christian terrorism remains a state legislator in Washington.

Shea’s story demonstrates that even deeply conservative Trump supporters (typically) see a bright line between the president’s brand of politics and those of far-right militias – even if the commander-in-chief sometimes blurs that distinction rhetorically. But it also reflects the fact that there are a large number of “atypical” ultraconservatives in the United States who are inclined to take Donald Trump’s most incendiary rhetoric – and that of Trump’s allies at Fox News – both seriously and literally. When Tucker Carlson informs his viewers that Democrats are plotting a “coup” that will irrevocably disempower white Christian America (by enfranchising undocumented immigrants), or when Laura Ingraham explains that immigrants are turning formerly Republican states into “Petri dish[es] for radical left-wing ideas,” some “Second Amendment people” will follow their paranoid, xenophobic logic to its endpoint.

In September, the president said on Twitter that if Democrats successfully remove him from office, it will cause “a Civil War like fracture.” One of Matt Shea’s allied organizations, the Oath Keepers, approvingly quoted Trump’s tweet.

“This is the truth,” the group wrote. “We ARE on the verge of a HOT civil war. Like in 1859. That’s where we are.”


https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2019/12/matt-shea-christian-terrorism-washington-report-ammon-bundy.html


Wow some on this site have told us that only Muslims think like that. As I’ve pointed out frequently, Republicans are increasingly beginning to look like the Islamic extremists


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:39 am
 


DrCaleb wrote:
Quote:
Juul bought ads on CartoonNetwork.com, NickJr.com, other kid sites, suit says

Popular e-cigarette maker Juul intentionally and egregiously tailored its marketing to appeal to underage youth, according to a lawsuit filed by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey on February 12.

The company’s early marketing in 2015 and 2016 purposefully used young, “cool” models in its launch campaign, recruited teen “influencers” on social media, and bought banner and video advertisements on numerous websites aimed at teens and children, including Cartoon Network’s cartoonnetwork.com and Nickelodeon’s sites Nick.com and NickJr.com. Juul even went so far as to give advice to underage consumers over email on how to get around age restrictions to make online purchases of the company's e-cigarettes.

The lawsuit lands as public health officials across the nation are still grappling with an explosion in e-cigarette use by youth, which the Food and Drug Administration has referred to as an “epidemic.” Between 2011 and 2019, recent use of e-cigarettes by middle schoolers increased from 0.6 percent to 10.5 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For high schoolers, use increased from 1.5 percent to 27.5 percent in that timeframe. That means that by 2019, more than 1 in every 4 high school students said they had used e-cigarettes within the last 30-days from the time of the survey.


https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/02 ... suit-says/


The kids sites that sold the ads should be held accountable too.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 13, 2020 10:42 am
 


BeaverFever wrote:
DrCaleb wrote:
Quote:
Juul bought ads on CartoonNetwork.com, NickJr.com, other kid sites, suit says

Popular e-cigarette maker Juul intentionally and egregiously tailored its marketing to appeal to underage youth, according to a lawsuit filed by Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey on February 12.

The company’s early marketing in 2015 and 2016 purposefully used young, “cool” models in its launch campaign, recruited teen “influencers” on social media, and bought banner and video advertisements on numerous websites aimed at teens and children, including Cartoon Network’s cartoonnetwork.com and Nickelodeon’s sites Nick.com and NickJr.com. Juul even went so far as to give advice to underage consumers over email on how to get around age restrictions to make online purchases of the company's e-cigarettes.

The lawsuit lands as public health officials across the nation are still grappling with an explosion in e-cigarette use by youth, which the Food and Drug Administration has referred to as an “epidemic.” Between 2011 and 2019, recent use of e-cigarettes by middle schoolers increased from 0.6 percent to 10.5 percent, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For high schoolers, use increased from 1.5 percent to 27.5 percent in that timeframe. That means that by 2019, more than 1 in every 4 high school students said they had used e-cigarettes within the last 30-days from the time of the survey.


https://arstechnica.com/science/2020/02 ... suit-says/


The kids sites that sold the ads should be held accountable too.


The Tobacco companies that own a big chunk of Juul should as well.


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:45 am
 


Quote:
Florida man: dialysis center won't allow life-sized Trump as emotional support

Associated Press in Port St Lucie, Florida

Last modified on Sat 15 Feb 2020 19.16 GMT
Nelson Gibson stops kidney treatments at Port St Lucie facility
‘They told me it wasn’t a rally,’ he says of reaction to cutout

A Florida man undergoing kidney dialysis three times a week is upset that he is not allowed to bring a life-sized cardboard cutout of Donald Trump to sessions, for emotional support.


:D

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/202 ... al-support


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 8:12 am
 


Quote:
Skip the Dishes driver says his leg was amputated because of road rage incident

Warning: This story contains a graphic image

A Skip the Dishes driver from Red Deer says he had his leg amputated because a man with road rage deliberately ran over him in a parking lot.

RCMP have since charged a 32-year-old man with dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing bodily harm, failure to stop after an accident causing bodily harm and assault with a weapon.

Matthew Ekstrom says he was driving west on 67th Street on Jan. 26 to pick up a food order from a Red Deer Fatburger restaurant.

Ekstrom, 26, said he needed to change into the right lane, so he cut in front of an SUV. The SUV changed lanes, sped up and cut in front of him.

"He sped up at the same time to not let me in on purpose," Ekstrom said, adding he nearly hit the SUV.

He said both vehicles came to a stop in the middle of 67th Street, near Golden West Avenue. It was around 4 p.m.

"He got out of his vehicle," Ekstrom said. "He comes to my vehicle. He tried to open my door. Once he realized he couldn't get to me because my door was locked, he started punching my window."

Ekstrom said he was on the phone with Bluetooth at the time, talking to a friend who also heard the banging on the window. He said the other driver got back into his car and stayed there.

Ekstrom waited a couple of minutes, but the man didn't leave.

"I figured I'd just get moving," he said. "I had a delivery to make."

When he began driving, the other driver followed him into a parking lot.

"I was trying to get away from him. I did a doughnut around some vehicles that were parked … and he was right behind the entire time. He wouldn't leave me alone."

Ekstrom said his friend finally arrived to help, so he pulled up next to him. They got out of their vehicles. He said he wanted to scare the other driver away, so he threw a coffee cup at his car, which prompted the man to drive around them in "circles."

He said his friend climbed back inside his truck to call the police. That's when the SUV drove toward Ekstrom.

"He came right for me. When I turned my head, that's when he must've cut it toward me. At that point, it was just too late. He hit me and I had no time to move out of the way."



https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton ... -1.5464879


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 9:34 am
 


BeaverFever wrote:
Wow some on this site have told us that only Muslims think like that. As I’ve pointed out frequently, Republicans are increasingly beginning to look like the Islamic extremists


I'm utterly shocked to see you acknowledge the very existence of Islamic extremists!

Now I need to look out the window for flying pigs! :lol:


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 7:50 am
 


Quote:
‘Victory for farmers’ as jury awards grower $265 million in damages from drift of Monsanto’s dicamba

. . . .

Mr. Bader’s suit challenged (pdf) Monsanto’s “willful and negligent release of a defective crop system—namely its genetically modified Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybeans and Bollgard II Xtend cotton seeds (“Xtend crops”)—without an accompanying, EPA-approved dicamba herbicide.”

“Monsanto sold the seeds before the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved the herbicides for market,” said the complaint.

The Baders, who did not use dicamba, said they lost over 30,000 trees due to Monsanto’s actions, as journlist Carey Gillam wrote earlier this month:

Quote:
Bader claims Monsanto sold GMO dicamba-tolerant soybean and cotton seeds despite knowing the actions would trigger chemical damage to farm fields that were not planted with the new seeds. The intent, the Bader Farms’ lawsuit alleges, was to induce farmers to buy the specialty seeds as a means to prevent crop damage from herbicide drift coming from neighboring farmers who were planting the GMO crops and spraying them with dicamba.

Testing showed that leaves of his dying peach trees carried traces of dicamba. The 5,000-acre family farm, which produced 5 million to 6 million pounds of peaches annually along with corn, soybeans, various berries, apples, and tomatoes, is now struggling to survive, according to Bader.


The jury sided with Bader Farms on Friday and awarded them $15 million in damages, as St. Louis Public Radio reported:

Quote:
Monsanto and BASF were found liable for negligent design of the products and negligent failure to warn regarding the products. The jury also found that the two companies created a joint venture to manufacture and sell dicamba-resistant seed and low-volatility herbicides, and that they conspired to create an “ecological disaster” to increase profits.


https://www.rawstory.com/2020/02/victor ... s-dicamba/


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 19, 2020 5:26 pm
 


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‘Old-boy-style racism’ by small-town cops leads to $600,000 payout to Portland man

Former West Linn Police Chief Terry Timeus had his officers work as his “personal posse” to initiate an unwarranted, racially motivated surveillance and arrest of a black Portland man as a favor to the chief’s fishing buddy.

The case had no ties to West Linn.

The city recently negotiated to pay $600,000 to the target of the rogue investigation, Michael Fesser, 48.

West Linn police also have agreed to a face-to-face meeting with Fesser.

The settlement is one of the largest in the state resulting from a wrongful arrest claim, Fesser’s lawyer Paul Buchanan said. It ends a federal lawsuit that Fesser filed in the summer of 2018.

“This case vividly illustrates a ready willingness on the part of the West Linn police to abuse the enormous power they have been given, and a casual, jocular, old-boy-style racism of the kind that we Oregonians tend to want to associate with the Deep South rather than our own institutions,” Buchanan said.

Attorney Andrew Campbell, who represented West Linn in court, did not respond to a request for comment Monday night.

The brazen misdeeds by West Linn police include making a surreptitious audio recording of Fesser at work without a warrant or court order, arresting him without probable cause with the help of Portland police and seizing his cash, cellphone and documents without a search warrant, court records show.

The case file includes a raft of racist and crude text messages between West Linn police and Fesser’s boss at the time, aimed at Fesser and others. The West Linn detective who led the investigation against Fesser deleted the offensive texts from his phone and claimed they weren’t of a racist or homophobic nature, but they were found on another phone, according to the records.

Fesser, a father of eight who now runs a prison ministry and transitional program to support men getting out of prison, said he took legal action so this doesn’t happen to another black man, including his two teenage sons.

“Ever since that arrest, I was terrified to go to West Linn,” Fesser said. “This has to be exposed, and it has to stop.”

‘My game my rules’

The West Linn investigation began in February 2017 after Fesser brought concerns of racial harassment by co-workers to his boss at the time, Eric Benson, owner of A&B Towing in Southeast Portland, court records show.

Fesser said other employees called him racist slurs and one asked him how he liked a Confederate flag that was fastened to a pickup parked in the tow company’s lot.

He had worked for the company since 2004, mostly managing its car auctions, selling impounded, abandoned and other cars. It was his job to record the amount of the sales, receive deposits and payments from bidders and handle the cash transactions.

After Fesser complained about a hostile workplace, Benson went to Timeus, his friend in West Linn who he had joined on four or five fishing trips.

Benson convinced the police chief to investigate unsupported allegations that Fesser was skimming proceeds from the car auctions, according to court records. Benson said he believed his company should have been earning more from the auctions and that Portland police wouldn’t respond to his concerns.

Timeus sent a text message to Benson on Feb. 21, 2017, saying his detective was finishing up a sex crimes case “and will have your case ready to go before Saturday … If I hear more, I’ll let you know.”

On Feb. 25, 2017, the West Linn police conducted surveillance of Fesser at his job. Police that day relied on an associate of Benson’s to record Fesser at work using an audio app called “Swann View.” Benson also watched a live feed from company video surveillance cameras, according to evidence obtained during the litigation.

Benson provided real-time updates to West Linn Detective Tony Reeves, text messages show.

As the surveillance went on, Benson and Reeves exchanged sexually explicit and homophobic banter, referencing themselves and the police chief, and made racist comments about Fesser, their text messages revealed.

At one point, Benson told Reeves that he regretted Fesser’s arrest wasn’t going to happen in Clackamas County because he had hoped to “make sure he was with some real racist boys.”

Benson added: “Dreams can never come true I guess” and followed up, writing, “Oh did I say that? I’m a bad person. I have some anger issues going on with him right now.”

At another point, Benson sent Reeves a photo of his dog. Reeves messaged, “Hope Fesser doesn’t get her in the law suit.” Benson wrote back, “Hahaha. She is not a fan of that type of folk. She is a wl (West Linn) dog.”

Although Reeves later admitted that officers hadn’t found any signs of wrongdoing by Fesser during the surveillance, he told another West Linn officer, along with five Portland officers, to stop Fesser as he headed home from work that day about 5 p.m.

“My game my rules,” Reeves wrote to the tow company’s owner just before police moved in.

Reeves continued in texts to Benson: “It’s better that we arrest him before he makes the complaint (of race discrimination). Then it can’t be retaliation.”

Fesser recalled seeing lights and sirens behind him and so he pulled over at Southeast 106th and Foster.

“I’m thinking they’re going to go by,” he recalled in an interview with The Oregonian/OregonLive on Monday.

But multiple police cruisers surrounded his black Range Rover.

A Portland sergeant told him that the Portland officers were just there to help West Linn police.

“West Linn? It has to be a mistake,” Fesser said he thought. “I know I haven’t done anything wrong. I’m terrified. I’m scared.”

‘How do police fire me from my job?’

West Linn police ordered Fesser out of his SUV. They took his phone, cash and a letter Fesser had written to his boss documenting the alleged racial discrimination he faced at work.

They took him to Portland’s East Precinct, where West Linn officers questioned him.

Reeves asked for the passcode to Fesser’s cellphone, but Fesser didn’t disclose it. Reeves said in a deposition later that he sought the passcode “in case I was able to obtain a search warrant to search his phone.”

Fesser was then taken to the downtown jail in Portland, booked on an aggravated theft allegation and released.

That night, Reeves had notified Benson that West Linn police had found a letter in Fesser’s car “about the work place and discrimination” and Benson alerted his fishing buddy, according to text messages obtained by Fesser’s lawyer.

Benson texted Chief Timeus at 6:26 p.m. that day, asking: “Can I get extra patrols for a bit at my house?”

“Yep, send me your address,” Timeus responded by text. “I’ll handle it.”

About two days later, West Linn police called Fesser, who had gotten a new phone with the same number, and told him to come to their department to retrieve his belongings.

Afraid to go on his own, Fesser waited for his wife to drive with him there. Once he arrived, Reeves told Fesser that he was fired from his job and ordered him to not return to A&B Towing’s property.

“How do police fire me from my job?’’ Fesser said he thought.

... The afternoon after Fesser went with his wife to the West Linn Police Department, Fesser attended his Multnomah County arraignment and learned prosecutors had declined to file the theft charge. The case was dismissed, though it could be revived in the future.

Months went by. Fesser checked daily with the court to see if the charge had been refiled. In September 2017, he filed a suit in Multnomah County courthouse against Benson and A&B Towing, alleging racial discrimination and retaliation.

That lawsuit led Benson to press West Linn police about Fesser’s theft charge, court records show. West Linn police, in turn, asked the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office to revive the case.

In November 2017, based largely on grand jury testimony by Reeves and Benson and statements from two witnesses who West Linn police described as “shady” and “dirty,” Fesser was indicted on five counts of first-degree theft, according to court records.

As Fesser’s lawsuit against the tow company was pending, lawyers for Fesser’s ex-boss offered to have the criminal charges against Fesser dismissed if Fesser dropped the civil suit, Buchanan said.

Fesser wouldn’t accept that.

Nearly a year after Fesser’s arrest, his lawyers finally received the damning text messages between Benson, the tow company owner, and Reeves, the West Linn detective. They came through an exchange of evidence in Fesser’s suit against A&B Towing.

“Only after he received the text messages did he understand that racism, cronyism and impropriety of the officer’s conduct and motivations,” Fesser’s lawyer wrote in court documents. “And only after he received the texts were all criminal charges precipitously dropped.”

In March 2018, Benson and A&B Towing agreed to pay Fesser $415,000 in damages, wages and attorney fees to settle his discrimination suit in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

The settlement included a clause that Fesser wouldn’t bring any further legal action against the company or its agents.

As his federal civil case then progressed against West Linn police, the department’s lawyers urged the court to dismiss the case, arguing that West Linn officers were acting as the “agents” of the tow company and therefore couldn’t be sued based on the state settlement.

“This assertion is virtually an admission of misconduct,” Buchanan, Fesser’s lawyer, responded last month. “Defendants were not seeking to engage in legitimate law enforcement. Rather, the officers were acting based on a striking and alarming personal malice, racism, and desire to protect a ‘good old boy’ from the West Linn community.”

West Linn police admitted in court records that they conducted audio surveillance of Fesser without a court order and seized his phone without a warrant.

Reeves was investigated and disciplined for failure to properly document the seizure of Fesser’s cash after his arrest, according to his deposition.

He also acknowledged that he didn’t document the seizure of Fesser’s cellphone and didn’t record the interview of Fesser in Portland – both violations of West Linn police policy.

Reeves, according to deposition records, also had deleted his Feb. 25, 2017, text message exchange with Benson and maintained that there had been no homophobic or racist remarks sent between them, according to court records.

Fesser and his lawyer already had the text messages from Benson’s phone and knew that to be false.

It’s unclear the level of discipline Reeves received. He was promoted to sergeant in March 2018.

Timeus, the police chief, said in a deposition that he heard his friend Benson use a racist slur at least a “half a dozen” times. Timeus admitted to having used the racist slur himself but said he couldn’t recall if it was when he was police chief or if he used it when referring to Fesser’s cases, according to his deposition transcript.

Timeus retired in October 2017 amid allegations that he drove drunk while off duty. He received more than $123,000 in a separation agreement.


https://www.oregonlive.com/crime/2020/0 ... riend.html


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 22, 2020 6:26 pm
 


And in today’s right-wing ridiculously opposite-from-truth batshittery, Rush Limbaugh now claims Democrats “tricked” George W Bush into invading Iraq.

https://www.newsweek.com/rush-limbaugh- ... ng-1488580


Of course Rush being a radio commentator is well documented as having been a very loud supporter of invading Iraq and the Republicans fabricated WMD claims. He’s also well documented calling Democrats traitors for not supporting those things

Like on his own website here:
https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.rushlim ... ssary/amp/


But today’s Republicans don’t really care about minor details such as “the obvious truth that the whole world witnessed with our own eyes and ears on a daily basis for most for the past 20 years”. That’s just some technicality easy to gloss over


Last edited by BeaverFever on Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 11:39 am
 


Quote:
Nursing home rationed diapers while residents suffered rashes, infections

A scathing complaint filed against top-level staff at an Alberta nursing home alleges administrators locked up diapers to limit their use while incontinent residents sat in urine-soaked pads, suffering from severe bladder and yeast infections, painful skin rashes and open wounds.

The allegation is just one of many in a complaint filed in December 2018 with the College and Association of Registered Nurses of Alberta (CARNA), claiming that senior staff at Athabasca Extendicare — a facility 145 kilometres north of Edmonton — did not deliver proper care and hygiene to 50 residents and that the home was constantly understaffed.

"It's just despicable," said Don Bryan, whose mother Sheila endured repeated bladder infections, yeast infections and skin rashes while at the home between December 2014 and November 2018, when she died at age 83.

"You don't treat elderly people that way," he said. "That's just so wrong."



https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton ... -1.5470130


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:12 pm
 


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‘Old-boy-style racism’ by small-town cops leads to $600,000 payout to Portland man

Former West Linn Police Chief Terry Timeus had his officers work as his “personal posse” to initiate an unwarranted, racially motivated surveillance and arrest of a black Portland man as a favor to the chief’s fishing buddy.

The case had no ties to West Linn.

The city recently negotiated to pay $600,000 to the target of the rogue investigation, Michael Fesser, 48.

West Linn police also have agreed to a face-to-face meeting with Fesser.

The settlement is one of the largest in the state resulting from a wrongful arrest claim, Fesser’s lawyer Paul Buchanan said. It ends a federal lawsuit that Fesser filed in the summer of 2018.

“This case vividly illustrates a ready willingness on the part of the West Linn police to abuse the enormous power they have been given, and a casual, jocular, old-boy-style racism of the kind that we Oregonians tend to want to associate with the Deep South rather than our own institutions,” Buchanan said.

Attorney Andrew Campbell, who represented West Linn in court, did not respond to a request for comment Monday night.

The brazen misdeeds by West Linn police include making a surreptitious audio recording of Fesser at work without a warrant or court order, arresting him without probable cause with the help of Portland police and seizing his cash, cellphone and documents without a search warrant, court records show.

The case file includes a raft of racist and crude text messages between West Linn police and Fesser’s boss at the time, aimed at Fesser and others. The West Linn detective who led the investigation against Fesser deleted the offensive texts from his phone and claimed they weren’t of a racist or homophobic nature, but they were found on another phone, according to the records.

Fesser, a father of eight who now runs a prison ministry and transitional program to support men getting out of prison, said he took legal action so this doesn’t happen to another black man, including his two teenage sons.

“Ever since that arrest, I was terrified to go to West Linn,” Fesser said. “This has to be exposed, and it has to stop.”

‘My game my rules’

The West Linn investigation began in February 2017 after Fesser brought concerns of racial harassment by co-workers to his boss at the time, Eric Benson, owner of A&B Towing in Southeast Portland, court records show.

Fesser said other employees called him racist slurs and one asked him how he liked a Confederate flag that was fastened to a pickup parked in the tow company’s lot.

He had worked for the company since 2004, mostly managing its car auctions, selling impounded, abandoned and other cars. It was his job to record the amount of the sales, receive deposits and payments from bidders and handle the cash transactions.

After Fesser complained about a hostile workplace, Benson went to Timeus, his friend in West Linn who he had joined on four or five fishing trips.

Benson convinced the police chief to investigate unsupported allegations that Fesser was skimming proceeds from the car auctions, according to court records. Benson said he believed his company should have been earning more from the auctions and that Portland police wouldn’t respond to his concerns.

Timeus sent a text message to Benson on Feb. 21, 2017, saying his detective was finishing up a sex crimes case “and will have your case ready to go before Saturday … If I hear more, I’ll let you know.”

On Feb. 25, 2017, the West Linn police conducted surveillance of Fesser at his job. Police that day relied on an associate of Benson’s to record Fesser at work using an audio app called “Swann View.” Benson also watched a live feed from company video surveillance cameras, according to evidence obtained during the litigation.

Benson provided real-time updates to West Linn Detective Tony Reeves, text messages show.

As the surveillance went on, Benson and Reeves exchanged sexually explicit and homophobic banter, referencing themselves and the police chief, and made racist comments about Fesser, their text messages revealed.

At one point, Benson told Reeves that he regretted Fesser’s arrest wasn’t going to happen in Clackamas County because he had hoped to “make sure he was with some real racist boys.”

Benson added: “Dreams can never come true I guess” and followed up, writing, “Oh did I say that? I’m a bad person. I have some anger issues going on with him right now.”

At another point, Benson sent Reeves a photo of his dog. Reeves messaged, “Hope Fesser doesn’t get her in the law suit.” Benson wrote back, “Hahaha. She is not a fan of that type of folk. She is a wl (West Linn) dog.”

Although Reeves later admitted that officers hadn’t found any signs of wrongdoing by Fesser during the surveillance, he told another West Linn officer, along with five Portland officers, to stop Fesser as he headed home from work that day about 5 p.m.

“My game my rules,” Reeves wrote to the tow company’s owner just before police moved in.

Reeves continued in texts to Benson: “It’s better that we arrest him before he makes the complaint (of race discrimination). Then it can’t be retaliation.”

Fesser recalled seeing lights and sirens behind him and so he pulled over at Southeast 106th and Foster.

“I’m thinking they’re going to go by,” he recalled in an interview with The Oregonian/OregonLive on Monday.

But multiple police cruisers surrounded his black Range Rover.

A Portland sergeant told him that the Portland officers were just there to help West Linn police.

“West Linn? It has to be a mistake,” Fesser said he thought. “I know I haven’t done anything wrong. I’m terrified. I’m scared.”

‘How do police fire me from my job?’

West Linn police ordered Fesser out of his SUV. They took his phone, cash and a letter Fesser had written to his boss documenting the alleged racial discrimination he faced at work.

They took him to Portland’s East Precinct, where West Linn officers questioned him.

Reeves asked for the passcode to Fesser’s cellphone, but Fesser didn’t disclose it. Reeves said in a deposition later that he sought the passcode “in case I was able to obtain a search warrant to search his phone.”

Fesser was then taken to the downtown jail in Portland, booked on an aggravated theft allegation and released.

That night, Reeves had notified Benson that West Linn police had found a letter in Fesser’s car “about the work place and discrimination” and Benson alerted his fishing buddy, according to text messages obtained by Fesser’s lawyer.

Benson texted Chief Timeus at 6:26 p.m. that day, asking: “Can I get extra patrols for a bit at my house?”

“Yep, send me your address,” Timeus responded by text. “I’ll handle it.”

About two days later, West Linn police called Fesser, who had gotten a new phone with the same number, and told him to come to their department to retrieve his belongings.

Afraid to go on his own, Fesser waited for his wife to drive with him there. Once he arrived, Reeves told Fesser that he was fired from his job and ordered him to not return to A&B Towing’s property.

“How do police fire me from my job?’’ Fesser said he thought.

... The afternoon after Fesser went with his wife to the West Linn Police Department, Fesser attended his Multnomah County arraignment and learned prosecutors had declined to file the theft charge. The case was dismissed, though it could be revived in the future.

Months went by. Fesser checked daily with the court to see if the charge had been refiled. In September 2017, he filed a suit in Multnomah County courthouse against Benson and A&B Towing, alleging racial discrimination and retaliation.

That lawsuit led Benson to press West Linn police about Fesser’s theft charge, court records show. West Linn police, in turn, asked the Multnomah County District Attorney’s Office to revive the case.

In November 2017, based largely on grand jury testimony by Reeves and Benson and statements from two witnesses who West Linn police described as “shady” and “dirty,” Fesser was indicted on five counts of first-degree theft, according to court records.

As Fesser’s lawsuit against the tow company was pending, lawyers for Fesser’s ex-boss offered to have the criminal charges against Fesser dismissed if Fesser dropped the civil suit, Buchanan said.

Fesser wouldn’t accept that.

Nearly a year after Fesser’s arrest, his lawyers finally received the damning text messages between Benson, the tow company owner, and Reeves, the West Linn detective. They came through an exchange of evidence in Fesser’s suit against A&B Towing.

“Only after he received the text messages did he understand that racism, cronyism and impropriety of the officer’s conduct and motivations,” Fesser’s lawyer wrote in court documents. “And only after he received the texts were all criminal charges precipitously dropped.”

In March 2018, Benson and A&B Towing agreed to pay Fesser $415,000 in damages, wages and attorney fees to settle his discrimination suit in Multnomah County Circuit Court.

The settlement included a clause that Fesser wouldn’t bring any further legal action against the company or its agents.

As his federal civil case then progressed against West Linn police, the department’s lawyers urged the court to dismiss the case, arguing that West Linn officers were acting as the “agents” of the tow company and therefore couldn’t be sued based on the state settlement.

“This assertion is virtually an admission of misconduct,” Buchanan, Fesser’s lawyer, responded last month. “Defendants were not seeking to engage in legitimate law enforcement. Rather, the officers were acting based on a striking and alarming personal malice, racism, and desire to protect a ‘good old boy’ from the West Linn community.”

West Linn police admitted in court records that they conducted audio surveillance of Fesser without a court order and seized his phone without a warrant.

Reeves was investigated and disciplined for failure to properly document the seizure of Fesser’s cash after his arrest, according to his deposition.

He also acknowledged that he didn’t document the seizure of Fesser’s cellphone and didn’t record the interview of Fesser in Portland – both violations of West Linn police policy.

Reeves, according to deposition records, also had deleted his Feb. 25, 2017, text message exchange with Benson and maintained that there had been no homophobic or racist remarks sent between them, according to court records.

Fesser and his lawyer already had the text messages from Benson’s phone and knew that to be false.

It’s unclear the level of discipline Reeves received. He was promoted to sergeant in March 2018.

Timeus, the police chief, said in a deposition that he heard his friend Benson use a racist slur at least a “half a dozen” times. Timeus admitted to having used the racist slur himself but said he couldn’t recall if it was when he was police chief or if he used it when referring to Fesser’s cases, according to his deposition transcript.

Timeus retired in October 2017 amid allegations that he drove drunk while off duty. He received more than $123,000 in a separation agreement.


https://www.oregonlive.com/crime/2020/0 ... riend.html


Beaver, you're welcome to repost this in the Police Misconduct page but it does not belong here unless you consider the City of Linn, Oregon to be 'right wing' even though the Mayor and the entire City Council are all Democrats.


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PostPosted: Mon Feb 24, 2020 12:21 pm
 


IDK, sounds Deplorable to me.


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