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Author:  Tricks [ Mon Sep 30, 2019 11:01 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

I think they're deriving from the same spot though, something is affecting gravity on the edge of the solar system and we don't know what it is. Planet 9/X is the theory.

Author:  DrCaleb [ Fri Oct 04, 2019 11:55 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Quote:
Scientists start mapping the hidden web that scaffolds the universe

Image
Quote:
A massive galaxy cluster from the simulation, with filaments. Credit: Joshua Borrow using C-EAGLE


After counting all the normal, luminous matter in the obvious places of the universe—galaxies, clusters of galaxies and the intergalactic medium—about half of it is still missing. So not only is 85% of the matter in the universe made up of an unknown, invisible substance dubbed "dark matter," we can't even find all the small amount of normal matter that should be there.

This is known as the "missing baryons" problem. Baryons are particles that emit or absorb light, like protons, neutrons or electrons, which make up the matter we see around us. The baryons unaccounted for are thought to be hidden in filamentary structures permeating the entire universe, also known as "the cosmic web."

But this structure is elusive and so far we have only seen glimpses of it. Now a new study, published in Science, offers a better view that will enable us to help map what it looks like.

The cosmic web provides the scaffolding of the large scale structure in the universe, predicted by the "standard cosmological model." Cosmologists believe there is a dark cosmic web, made of dark matter, and a luminous cosmic web, made of mostly hydrogen gas. In fact, it is believed that 60% of the hydrogen created during the Big Bang resides in these filaments.

The web of gas filaments is also known as the "warm-hot intergalactic medium" (WHIM), because it is roughly as hot as the sun's interior. Galaxies are likely to form at the intersection of two or more such filaments, where the matter is densest, with the filaments connecting all galaxy clusters in the universe.



https://phys.org/news/2019-10-scientist ... verse.html

Author:  llama66 [ Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:06 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Quote:
For every action, there is a reaction: that is the principle on which all space rockets operate, blasting propellant in one direction to travel in the other. But one NASA engineer believes he could take us to the stars without any propellant at all.

Designed by David Burns at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, the “helical engine” exploits mass-altering effects known to occur at near-light speed. Burns has posted a paper describing the concept to NASA’s technical reports server.

It has been met with scepticism from some quarters, but Burns believes his concept is worth pursuing. “I’m comfortable with throwing it out there,” he says. “If someone says it doesn’t work, I’ll be the first to say, it was worth a shot.”


To get to grips with the principle of Burns’s engine, picture a box on a frictionless surface. Inside that box is a rod, along which a ring can slide. If a spring inside the box gives the ring a push, the ring will slide along the rod one way while the box will recoil in the other. When the ring reaches the end of the box, it will bounce backwards, and the box’s recoil direction will switch too. This is action-reaction – also known as Newton’s third law of motion – and in normal circumstances, it restricts the box to wiggling back and forth (see video below).



Read more: https://www.newscientist.com/article/22 ... z62RJ8rdQE



https://www.newscientist.com/article/22 ... f-physics/

Author:  DrCaleb [ Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:14 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Yea, that one is pretty controversial.

https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20190029657

Author:  llama66 [ Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:38 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

If it works, it would be revolutionary.

Author:  DrCaleb [ Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:46 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

The EM-Drive was the same. If it had worked, it would be game changing. Turns out, it was an experimental error.

The idea of the Helical engine using energy to increase mass, then decrease it to 'circumvent' the laws of motion is pretty cool. But The Laws must be obeyed! ;)

Author:  llama66 [ Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:48 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

But if the laws could be bent that would be alright too!

Author:  DrCaleb [ Tue Oct 15, 2019 9:56 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Nothing says The Laws can't be amended to accommodate new experimental data. It just means we didn't understand The Laws fully.

Science always allows for new data. :)

Author:  DrCaleb [ Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:48 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Quote:
Hubble Observes 1st Confirmed Interstellar Comet

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has given astronomers their best look yet at an interstellar visitor — comet 2I/Borisov — whose speed and trajectory indicate it has come from beyond our solar system.

This Hubble image, taken on Oct. 12, 2019, is the sharpest view of the comet to date. Hubble reveals a central concentration of dust around the nucleus (which is too small to be seen by Hubble).

Comet 2I/Borisov is only the second such interstellar object known to have passed through the solar system. In 2017, the first identified interstellar visitor, an object officially named 'Oumuamua, swung within 24 million miles of the Sun before racing out of the solar system. "Whereas 'Oumuamua appeared to be a rock, Borisov is really active, more like a normal comet. It's a puzzle why these two are so different," said David Jewitt of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), leader of the Hubble team who observed the comet.



Image


https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/20 ... llar-comet

Author:  Fighter [ Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:53 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Chinese space mission brings first seeds to life on moon’s surface


Author:  stratos [ Wed Oct 16, 2019 10:54 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Dr. does the Hubble broadcast live fed all the time? If so do you know the link and if you can post it here. I would like to view it at times if possible. Sat morning 3am and can't sleep is a prefect time for me. 8)

Author:  DrCaleb [ Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:10 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

stratos wrote:
Dr. does the Hubble broadcast live fed all the time? If so do you know the link and if you can post it here. I would like to view it at times if possible. Sat morning 3am and can't sleep is a prefect time for me. 8)


No, Hubble is not a web cam. :P It takes a long time to get access to it, and then you only get the raw data, not processed.

If you want something to snap your eyelids shut, try C-SPAN. ;)

Author:  llama66 [ Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:16 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Oh gawd. Any of those government channels.

Them "Lets vote on bill C-119 the bill that allows us to...."
Me "ZZZZZZZzzzzzzzZZZZZZzzzzzz" *drool* "zzzzzzZZZZZZZzzzzzzZZZZZZ"

Author:  stratos [ Wed Oct 16, 2019 11:18 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Quote:
If you want something to snap your eyelids shut, try C-SPAN.



You mean burn my eyes out :P

Author:  DrCaleb [ Tue Oct 22, 2019 8:28 am ]
Post subject:  Re: Space Thread

Quote:
Ten Highlights From NASA’s Van Allen Probes Mission

After seven years of operations, and upon finally running out of propellant, the second of the twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft will be retired on Friday, Oct. 18, 2019. Spacecraft A of the Van Allen Probes mission will be shut down by operators at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Maryland. The command follows one three months previously that terminated operations for spacecraft B, the second spacecraft of the mission.

“This mission spent seven years in the radiation belts, and broke all the records for a spacecraft to tolerate and operate in that hazardous region, all with no interruptions,” said Nelofar Mosavi, Van Allen Probes project manager at Johns Hopkins APL. “This mission was about resiliency against the harshest space environment.”

Originally slated for a two-year mission, the spacecraft flew through the Van Allen belts — rings of charged particles trapped by Earth’s magnetic field — to understand how particles were gained and lost by the belts. The spacecraft made major discoveries that revolutionized how we understand our near-Earth environment.



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https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/20 ... es-mission

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