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PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 6:42 am
 


CanadianJeff CanadianJeff:
jj2424 jj2424:
BRAH BRAH:
Make pot legal and tax it.


Yeah tax it as much as cigarettes . I'm sure Curt and his buddies will quit growing their own...and selling it too. XD


People make their own beer all the time so why not let people grow their own pot?

Besides something tells me I'd rather have a guy like Curtman running around with the stuff then the bloody Hell's Angels selling it.



Making beer is different than making it and selling it. The HA aren't going to stop growing it and selling it. Do you really think they would turn over a new leaf? XD


You guys have been smoking too much.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 7:02 am
 


Yep and you epically fail to grasp the point again and invent your own straw man.

This is quickly becoming a pattern with you.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 7:03 am
 


$15/gram? That's bullshit, man! Ricky was selling to Lahey and Randy for only $10 per.

Image

Image





PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 7:55 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:
Curtman Curtman:
OnTheIce OnTheIce:
Contraband increased with lower taxes on cigarettes. How do you explain that?


Lets have some dodge to back that one up please.


Coming from the guy that dodged a question twice....ironic.


http://www.smoke-free.ca/pdf_1/2011/contraband2010.pdf


and...

$1:
In February 1994, the federal government slashed tobacco excise taxes
and offered to match any provincial tax cuts up to $5 per carton (Canada,
House of Commons Debates, 8 February 1994; CRA, 1994; Dupuis, 1998). By
reducing the price of cigarettes, the government intended to reduce the profitability of contraband tobacco and thus eliminate the crime associated with
the black market.4 A marked decline in the volume of contraband seizures
following the tax rollback suggests that the repeal reduced contraband trafficking until the early 2000s
(Cunningham, 1996; RCMP, 2010b).


http://www.fraserinstitute.org/uploaded ... n-canada(1).Pdf

So a couple years of less contraband seizures and we're back to to all-time highs.



This is hilarious.. Your own link says the opposite of your claim. Lowering the taxes worked. When we raised the taxes again, the gangs resumed. Since then we've raised them substantially from where they were when the problem arose in the 90's therefore we have more of a black market.

I haven't dodged any of your questions. I only pointed out that your question indicated that you misunderstood part of our conversation. Now I'm thinking you still have no idea what you're talking about.





PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 9:42 am
 


CanadianJeff CanadianJeff:
Yep and you epically fail to grasp the point again and invent your own straw man.

This is quickly becoming a pattern with you.


Exagerate much?

I notice when you have no real answer you always resort to personal attacks. 95% of the time.


It's definitely a pattern with you.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 31, 2013 10:16 am
 


Only with you sunshine. If you actually try saying anything intelligent you may find people actually engaging with you in dialog.





PostPosted: Sun Sep 01, 2013 4:34 am
 


http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/pol ... e14010389/
$1:
A poll conducted last week by Forum Research found that 36 per cent of Canadians preferred legalization, while 34 per cent were in favour of decriminalization. Another 15 per cent felt the laws should be kept as is (a proportion that has been shrinking over the last two years), and 13 per cent felt the laws should be harsher. Nevertheless, a relaxing of the rules concerning marijuana is overwhelmingly favoured: 70 per cent said they wanted legalization or decriminalization.
...
And, contrary to popular opinion, the Liberal leader’s move should not necessarily be seen as a means of capturing the youth vote. The polls do not always show that the youngest Canadians are the most likely to support legalization. In fact, it seems that the only generation gap is between seniors and the rest of the population.

The survey by Ipsos-Reid in June 2012 on decriminalization found support to be highest among middle-aged Canadians between the ages of 35 and 54 (69 per cent), while it stood at 68 per cent among those 34 or younger. Support was still high among the oldest Canadians, at 62 per cent, but that was the only generational gap. The results of Angus-Reid’s November 2012 poll on legalization were similar: 58 per cent support among 18-to-34 year olds, 61 per cent among those between the ages of 35 and 54, and only 51 per cent among those 55 or older. That has been a consistent trend: the Angus-Reid poll of 2007 found a similar distribution.

The polling by Forum has been less consistent on this issue with no obvious correlation between age and support for either legalization or decriminalization, though in their last two surveys support for legalization was highest among the young. On the other hand, they have also shown that the most significant increase in support for some relaxing of the laws has come among the oldest Canadians.

In any case, if there does seem to be some sort of generational gap it could be between those who were teenagers before and after, say, the benchmark year of 1968. That broadly aligns with the most important difference recorded by Ipsos-Reid and Angus-Reid between Canadians over and under the age of 55. Even so, the consensus among older Canadians is still for legalization or decriminalization.

Politically, the move could pay dividends for the Liberal leader. Support for either legalization or decriminalization cuts across party lines, with Liberals and New Democrats almost evenly split between support for either options. But the Conservatives, offside with public opinion generally, seem to be on the wrong path with their own supporters: 62 per cent of them told Forum they favoured either legalization or decriminalization.

Furthermore, support for legalization has consistently been highest in British Columbia. The province is setting up to be a major battleground in 2015, and the Liberals appear to be on the right side of the issue there. Nationwide, it seems that the Liberals have not taken much of a risk in moving so strongly on changes to how the law handles marijuana. If the Tories and NDP are to use Mr. Trudeau’s position against him, they will first have to transform how Canadians feel about the drug itself.


R=UP


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 8:06 pm
 


jj2424 jj2424:

Making beer is different than making it and selling it. The HA aren't going to stop growing it and selling it. Do you really think they would turn over a new leaf? XD


You guys have been smoking too much.

That's getting to be a rather worn out strawman. Nobody with any brains has said the HA will get out of the weed business. Hell, they're still in the alcohol business.
The question is, do you want criminal enterprises to control 100% of the market, or have a seriously reduced market?
Unless you have a black thumb, growing weed is easier than brewing your own beer or making your own wine.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 8:20 pm
 


i prefer beer, so I'll make the extra effort


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 06, 2013 8:25 pm
 


ShepherdsDog ShepherdsDog:
i prefer beer, so I'll make the extra effort

Lucky for you, you have that as a legal option :wink:


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 07, 2013 7:42 am
 


I like a decent shine too. Had some a couple months ago.....smooth as spring water with a slightly sweet finish(similar to Jamesons). It was made using apples and corn as a base.





PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2013 6:45 am
 


Stephen Harper Marijuana Joke Draws Laughs In Kelowna
$1:
WEST KELOWNA, B.C. - Prime Minister Stephen Harper called upon the legacy of Sir. John A. Macdonald during a comic foray into British Columbia's marijuana debate.

Harper says when the country's first prime minister was a member of Parliament for Victoria, B.C., in the 19th century, he focused on issues that mattered, like economic growth, not grow-ops, and about a national dream, not a pipe dream.



ROTFL

Save the one-liners Steve. If that's all you have to add to the legalization discussion you don't want to use them all up right away!



This was awesome.. Steve tells us very clearly that prohibition supports international cartels and the worst "unimaginable" violence on our planet, and that we should be worried about the Keystone XL pipe dream instead of ending that support. We can't do both apparently. And he's not entirely sure how old his kids are, but he knows they shouldn't be smoking marijuana, and isn't quite sure how to prevent that.

It's going to be a great election campaign if they're going to discuss the issue in this conflicted way.

Steve (Definitely not Nostradamus) Steve (Definitely not Nostradamus):
I can predict with uhhhhhhhh a lot of uhhhhhhhh confidence these would never be respectable businesses run by respectable people. ... Sometimes I'm frustrated by how little impact governments have been able to have on the drug trade internationally, but we should not fool ourselves into thinking that if we somehow if we stop trying to deal with it, it would suddenly turn into a nice wholesome industry. It will never be that.


Steve has a tell. Uhhhhhhhhhh I'm uhhhhhh lying to uhhhhh you. Prohibition is when we stop trying to deal with "it". Regulation will be when we start trying.



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PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2013 10:55 am
 


Curtman Curtman:
he focused on issues that mattered, like economic growth, not grow-ops, and about a national dream, not a pipe dream.



Focus on issues that matter to Canadians. While the majority Canadians support a change in drug laws, it's not at the top of their list.





PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:10 am
 


OnTheIce OnTheIce:
Curtman Curtman:
he focused on issues that mattered, like economic growth, not grow-ops, and about a national dream, not a pipe dream.



Focus on issues that matter to Canadians. While the majority Canadians support a change in drug laws, it's not at the top of their list.


The Propaganda Video The Propaganda Video:
It was the question with the most votes.


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PostPosted: Sat Sep 14, 2013 11:19 am
 


Curtman Curtman:

The Propaganda Video The Propaganda Video:
It was the question with the most votes.


Well damn....I guess that means it's the most important issue in the Country today!

Some of us have real priorities beyond what drugs we put into our body.


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