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Daily Canada Newswatch

Submit News to CKA News Emergency crews on standby at Kelowna airport after reported threat
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:49:22 -0400
A bomb squad has been called in to investigate at an airport in Kelowna, B.C. after a threat was reportedly made toward a plane.
Submit News to CKA News Disabled cargo ship heading home to Russia after repairs in B.C.
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:43:24 +0000

A tug boat arrived Saturday to tow the ship after a Canadian Coast Guard tow line snapped three times, setting the vessel adrift

The post Disabled cargo ship heading home to Russia after repairs in B.C. appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Disabled cargo ship heading home to Russia after repairs at B.C. port
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:37:00 -0400
Repairs to a Russian container ship have enabled it to head home after a power outage left the vessel loaded with diesel fuel adrift off British Columbia's north coast.
Submit News to CKA News In Toronto, a vote is a terrible thing to waste: Cohn
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:26:12 EDT

There’s a reason turnout will be unusually high in Monday’s mayoral race. And that voting in advance polls has set new records.

More Torontonians than ever want their votes to count. Count me among them.

A vote is a terrible thing to waste at any time. But this time, after four lost years of mayoral madness, the stakes are higher than ever.

Unlike conventional elections, where voters evaluate competing platforms and choose from among rival candidates, this vote is a clear referendum on the Ford brothers: Who best to banish their toxic legacy?

Say what you will about third-place Olivia Chow, with all her strengths and weaknesses, every poll suggests she is simply not up to the task at hand: putting Toronto out of its misery by putting the Fords out to pasture. Trailing badly, she cannot possibly overtake her two main rivals.

As the front-runner, John Tory is best placed to deliver the coup de grace, gracefully. He is not only exceedingly qualified to be an excellent mayor at a troubled time, he is the only one in a position to defeat Doug Ford (open Doug Ford's policard) — whom the polls show is still within striking distance.

Politics is a tough game — an unforgiving fusion of personalities, ideologies and chronologies. Timing is everything in politics, and this is simply not Chow’s time.

It’s time to rid us of the Fords. When Karen Stintz (open Karen Stintz's policard)was trailing, she recognized that bracing reality and quietly dropped out. So too did David Soknacki when he realized he couldn’t win.

Chow’s progressive supporters can intellectualize, rationalize or fantasize about fidelity to their cause. But nothing else counts as much as defeating the Fords.

If she is doomed on voting day, it matters not whether Chow has an appealing platform on transit. As vital as transit is to this gridlocked city, nothing will move forward until the political gridlock fostered by the Fords is pushed aside.

Chow might make a fine mayor, but she is not up to the job of dislodging the Fords — and healing the urban-suburban divide they so shamelessly exploited. Now, Torontonians need not just unity but sanity and probity.

Tory can deliver on all three.

He is eminently practical and ethical. He can play the role of conciliator and facilitator that our divided city council badly needs. He understands public policy and fiscal reality.

Yes, he has a patrician bearing, after being raised as a blue blood. But he has spent a lifetime immersing himself in public life.

As for the phony rhetoric that Tory is elitist? The Fords are rich kids disguised as faux populists. And Chow is NDP royalty, surely interwoven with the political elites that bestride the country.

All three candidates live in a rarefied world of advisers, handlers, donors and fawners. To claim only Tory is of the elites is like labelling Chow ambitious — it’s beside the point, because it applies to all politicians.

Explaining how they cast their ballots in 2010, many reluctant supporters of far-right Rob Ford (open Rob Ford's policard) or left-leaning candidate Joe Pantalone claimed they just couldn’t bring themselves to back George Smitherman, the abrasive centrist. In the 2014 race, thankfully, Tory has nothing like Smitherman’s negatives, and enough positives to prevail over the folly of the Fords.

He is decent, dignified, dedicated, intelligent, honest and earnest. He may not be my first choice for mayor (personally, I liked Soknacki’s quixotic realism, but as a realist he wisely withdrew his candidacy). But Tory is quite simply the best choice in the circumstances.

Yes, I confess to being a so-called strategic voter because to me, politics is the art of the possible. Until we come up with a ranked ballot (electronic runoff), there is no shame in choosing a candidate who possesses both wisdom and winnability — for one without the other is a losing proposition.

Isn’t Tory coasting to victory anyway? Can’t progressives stick with Chow till the bitter end, confident that Tory will ultimately knock off Ford for us all?

It might feel comforting to prop up the progressive banner, but complacency comes at a high price. History proves that polling is an unpredictable business. Only an overconfident risk-taker would conclude that Doug Ford cannot possibly pull off an upset victory on voting day if Chow splits the anti-Ford vote.

Voting for a third-place also-ran would be a reckless gamble in Toronto’s game of high stakes poker. If the outcome is four more lost years, how will Torontonians forgive themselves for folding their hand and throwing the game?

As a Queen’s Park columnist, I suppose I should be careful what I wish for: If Tory triumphs on Monday, Doug Ford may yet carry out his perennial threat to seek the leadership of Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives — for whom he once prescribed “an enema from top to bottom.”

Should he win next year’s PC leadership convention, he’ll surely make my life miserable. But it’s a price I’d cheerfully pay to spare Toronto any more misery …

More seriously: Please vote!

Martin Regg Cohn?s Ontario politics column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. mcohn@thestar.ca , Twitter: @reggcohn

Submit News to CKA News Judge warns Kamloops woman who hit two people with pipe from her purse
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:21:18 Z
KAMLOOPS, B.C. - A Kamloops, B.C., woman who attacked two people with a metal pipe she pulled from her purse has been spared a jail sentence, though a judge warned her behaviour could mean more time behind bars.
Submit News to CKA News Exclusive: Ottawa shooter Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was ?at odds with the world,? mother says
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:19:09 Z
Michael Zehaf-Bibeau’s terror-filled rampage in the nation’s capital this week wasn’t driven by some grand ideology or political motive, but rather was the “last desperate act” of someone who was not well in his mind and felt trapped, his mother […]
Submit News to CKA News Alberta Byelection 2014: Your guide to the candidates, the ridings and the issues - Calgary Sun
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:08:38 GMT

Calgary Sun

Alberta Byelection 2014: Your guide to the candidates, the ridings and the issues
Calgary Sun
After weeks of announcements, promises, forums, Twitter fights and no small amount of candidate mudslinging, Albertans are finally heading to the polls. The October 27 vote will decide once and for all (or until the next general election) who will represent ...
Opposition hoping Redford's legacy bolsters chances in Calgary ElbowCalgary Herald
Schools key in 'vintage' Tory riding of Calgary-WestEdmonton Journal
Prentice, Dirks, Mandel blasted by Wildrose for mid-campaign government workCBC.ca
660 News -Globalnews.ca
all 18 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Montrealers attend vigil for two Canadian soldiers killed this week
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:08:27 Z
Dozens of people sign books of condolence in Dorchester Square to pay respects to the two Canadian soldiers killed this week.
Submit News to CKA News Would-be concert crasher gets stuck in vent at PNE - CTV News
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 21:01:27 GMT

CBC.ca

Would-be concert crasher gets stuck in vent at PNE
CTV News
A would-be concert crasher had to be rescued from a vent at the Pacific Coliseum early Saturday morning after apparently trying to sneak into Dooms Night 2014, an electronic music event. Rescue crews removed the man from the vent at around 2 a.m. He ...
PNE vent catches music lover trying to sneak into concertCBC.ca
Concert crasher gets stuck in vent at PNENews1130
Pacific Coliseum concert crasher gets stuck in ventGlobalnews.ca

all 4 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Industrial explosion, fire in Sarnia, Ont., injures 5 - CBC.ca
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:58:11 GMT

CBC.ca

Industrial explosion, fire in Sarnia, Ont., injures 5
CBC.ca
The mayor of Sarnia says five people have been sent to hospital after an explosion at an industrial facility in the southwestern Ontario city. The explosion happened Saturday afternoon at Veolia ES Canada Industrial Services Inc. on Scott Road north of ...
Five injured in explosion at industrial site in Sarnia, OntarioCTV News
Sarnia industrial explosion injures five workersSarnia Observer
Many People Injured in Explosion in Sarnia, Canada: ReportsRIA Novosti
Bayshore Broadcasting News Centre -BlackburnNews.com
all 23 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Sarnia, Ontario, plant explosion injures five ? one critically
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:57:39 +0000
Mayor Mike Bradley says one person was critically injured in the blast, while three suffered serious injuries and one has minor injuries
Submit News to CKA News Parliament Hill reporter Mark Dunn dies at 53
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:45:14 -0400

Mark Dunn, senior national bureau reporter for QMI Agency, died Saturday after a battle with cancer. He was 53.
Submit News to CKA News John Tory releases list of campaign donors ? with a lot of big names
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:42:13 EDT

Frontrunning mayoral candidate John Tory has released his list of campaign donors that includes a number of heavy hitters from the business world.

The Tory campaign said it has received more than 5,000 donations totalling $2.48 million so far. A final tally will be released after Monday’s election.

Tory followed Olivia Chow, who released her donors last week showing she had raised $1.76 million as of Oct. 21. Candidate Doug Ford (open Doug Ford's policard) promised that he would release his list on Saturday as well.

Ford took the opportunity to deride Tory’s financial backers as people who are looking for “favours” from city hall.

“All those people are coming to city hall, the taxpayers, with their hat in hand waiting for the favours to be handed out,” Ford told reporters on the campaign trail.

“It’s pretty simple,” Ford continued. “He has $2.4 million. That’s a lot of favours in my opinion.”

Tory said he was gratified by the campaign’s success raising money, including support from “lots of people” who gave small amounts.

“We had people come into our office with $10 in cash to give us,” he said. “We raised the money we needed to finance the campaign, and we’ll probably have a surplus in fact.”

“I just would say that he (Ford) shouldn’t say things like that because I think it demeans everybody in the process to even suggest that kind of thing.”

The list of donors revealed a slew of prominent names from the business world, both active and retired.

Sports Management: Tom Anselmi, Paul Beeston, Larry Tanenbaum.

Politics: John Carmichael, Martha Hall Findlay, Linda Frum, Ernie Hardemann, Chin Lee (open Chin Lee's policard), Darcy McKeough, David Peterson, Frank McKenna.

Broadcasting: Phil Lind, Edward Rogers, Allan Slaight, Ivan Fecan, Richard Stursberg.

Real Estate Development/investment: Shane Baghai, Andrew Barnicke, J. Lorne Braithwaite, Rudolph Bratty, Mitch Goldhar, Cary Green, Jon Love, Alan Menkes, Albert Reichmann, Bryan Tuckey, Silvio De Gasperis, Leo Del Zotto, Julie Di Lorenzo, Steve Diamond, Stuart Lazier.

Business/Bay St.: Brent Belzberg, John Bitove Jr., John Bitove Sr., Michael Bregman, Paul Bronfman, Gordon Nixon, W. Edmund Clark, John E. Cleghorn, Jack Cockwell, J. Trevor Eyton, Anthony Fell, George Fierheller, J. Bruce Flatt, Ira Gluskin, Peter Godsoe, Blake Goldring, Richard Ivey, Henry Jackman, Michael McCain, Michael Nobrega, Seymour Shulich, Barbara Stymiest, W. Galen Weston, Charles Winograd, Dennis Fotinos.

Law: Mary Flynn-Guglietti, Brian Greenspan, Clifford Lax, Roy McMurtry, Jane Pepino, Arthur Scace.

Politics: John Carmichael, Martha Hall Findlay, Linda Frum, Ernie Hardemann, Chin Lee, Darcy McKeough, David Peterson, Frank McKenna.

Lobbying/government relations: Paul Christie, Terry Mundell, Harry Near.

Theatre: Aubrey Dan.

Other: Children’s rights activist Marc Kielburger.

Submit News to CKA News Vaughn Palmer: ?The finest savage I have met with yet? ? but Judge Begbie sent him to hang anyway
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:36:50 Z
September 1864. The Crown colony of British Columbia. Judge Matthew Begbie wrote to the governor of the day about the fate of five native leaders charged with killing 20 whites in the clash known as the Chilcotin War. Begbie had presided over jury trials that produced guilty verdicts for all five. He also personally interviewed the head war chief, whose name he transcribed as Klatssassin.
Submit News to CKA News The promise of LNG has B.C.?s Northwest buzzing
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:36:37 Z
Even as communities prepare for the boom, they realize it may never happen
Submit News to CKA News Sergeant-at-arms made daring dive to take down gunman: report - Ottawa Citizen
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:34:39 GMT

Ottawa Citizen

Sergeant-at-arms made daring dive to take down gunman: report
Ottawa Citizen
Sergeant-at-arms Kevin Vickers dove and flipped onto his back, all the while firing his pistol, to take down gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, sources told CBC. Pawel Dwulit / The Canadian Press. Share Adjust Comment Print. A new report about how a ...
Canadians flock to Parliament Hill, site of attack on soldierReuters Canada
Canadians return to reopened grounds of Parliament Hill days after gunman ...Fox News
Visitors flock to reopened Parliament HillThe Globe and Mail
Hamilton Spectator -CBC.ca -Canada.com
all 8,215 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News 5 injured in explosion at Sarnia industrial site
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:33:29 EDT

SARNIA, ONT.—The mayor of this southwestern Ontario city says five people have been sent to hospital after an explosion at an industrial facility.

Mayor Mike Bradley said the explosion occurred Saturday afternoon at the Veolia ES Canada Industrial Services Inc. plant.

He said one person was critically injured in the blast, while three suffered serious injuries and one has minor injuries.

The fire is out and the scene is now “under control,” he said. There was major damage to the plant.

Fire and emergency services are at the scene.

Submit News to CKA News Five injured in explosion at industrial site in Sarnia, Ontario
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:20:00 -0400
Five people have been rushed to hospital following an explosion at an industrial site in Sarnia, Ont., Saturday afternoon.
Submit News to CKA News Five injured, one critically, following industrial explosion in Sarnia
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:07:54 -0400
It wasn?t immediately clear what caused the explosion
Submit News to CKA News Montreal Muslim says Ottawa, St-Jean-sur-Richelieu attacks "not in my name" - CBC.ca
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 20:06:09 GMT

CBC.ca

Montreal Muslim says Ottawa, St-Jean-sur-Richelieu attacks "not in my name"
CBC.ca
One Quebec Muslim teenager's message has gone viral after he posted a photo of himself holding a sign that reads ?pas en mon nom? ? ?not in my name? ? in response to this week's killing of two soldiers in separate attacks in Ottawa and ...
Open letter from Tom Mulcair to the Muslim communityNorthumberlandView.ca
Ghitis: Malala's anti-ISIS message for CanadaKSPR
Canada must recalculate the cost of securityThe Globe and Mail
ErieTVNews -News1130
all 25 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News How does a viola cross the ocean?
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:46:51 +0000

At great peril, thanks to an anti-viola stance taken by some airlines

The post How does a viola cross the ocean? appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Canadians to observe Ukraine election
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:42:38 -0400

A group of nearly 200 Canadians is in Ukraine to serve as election observers for parliamentary elections on Sunday.
Submit News to CKA News Don?t put that keg of ale away just yet
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:10:08 +0000

Canada is infatuated with cask ale, but just ask Britain?love isn?t forever

The post Don?t put that keg of ale away just yet appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Let's give Kevin Vickers the Cross of Valour
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:04:15 -0400

Within minutes of ending the threat on Parliament Hill with his Glock pistol, people were calling him a hero.
Submit News to CKA News Volunteers rescue injured hunter in Alta.
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:00:02 -0400

Had it not been for his wife, his friends and some good samaritans responding to a Facebook post, Trevor Simon would have likely frozen to death by Friday morning.
Submit News to CKA News Canadian Forces efforts to recover Second World War aircraft underway - Ottawa Citizen
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 19:00:01 GMT

Ottawa Citizen

Canadian Forces efforts to recover Second World War aircraft underway
Ottawa Citizen
Recovery operations of a Second World War Northrop Nomad aircraft in Lake Muskoka are taking place today and run until November 3. The Royal Canadian Air Force will lead the recovery operation of the Nomad aircraft, which crashed in Lake Muskoka in ...
Attempt to raise military plane in 1940 crashNew Westminster News Leader

all 12 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Sexual assault suspect arrested and charged after Yonge St. incident
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:45:21 EDT

A man has been arrested and charged with sexual assault following an incident near Yonge St. and Finch Ave. early Saturday morning.

It is alleged that, at about 3:50 a.m., a 30-year-old female victim was walking when a male approached from behind and assaulted her. The victim fought with the man, and he fled the scene.

Mark Towell, 37, of Richmond Hill was arrested in the area after police were contacted. He will appear in court at Old City Hall on Sunday.

Submit News to CKA News Wynne leaves for weeklong China trade trip - CTV News
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:43:17 GMT

CTV News

Wynne leaves for weeklong China trade trip
CTV News
TORONTO -- Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne is headed to China on a weeklong mission that will see her and the premiers of Quebec and Prince Edward Island talk trade with the Asian economic powerhouse. Wynne departed Saturday and is taking about ...
Premier's Mission to China: An OverviewGovernment of Ontario News
Ontario Premier Wynne's China visit seeks to reduce US relianceThe Globe and Mail
Don Macpherson: The Couillard government's 'one language, one culture' idea ...Montreal Gazette

all 106 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Burnaby residents to block Kinder Morgan?s survey work
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:30:32 Z
Concerned Burnaby residents are ready to block Kinder Morgan from resuming work on Burnaby Mountain, after the National Energy Board ruled Thursday the city can’t stop the survey project for a new pipeline route. The NEB’s order says Kinder Morgan must give the city of Burnaby 48 hours notice before starting work. It also prohibits the city from blocking Kinder Morgan, even though the land is a city-owned conservation area, and Burnaby is opposed to the pipeline expansion.
Submit News to CKA News Mushrooms go wild all over the Lower Mainland
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:29:57 Z
Have you noticed a lot of mushrooms growing in your neighbourhood?
Submit News to CKA News New Russian ambassador to receive cool welcome
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:21:31 Z
The Conservative government is offering a cool response to Russia’s appointment of a new ambassador to Canada.
Submit News to CKA News Who, me? Taylor Swift, famous? Nah.
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:14:40 +0000

An everygirl realness is vital to Taylor Swift?s success. But the illusion is getting harder to keep up.

The post Who, me? Taylor Swift, famous? Nah. appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Gormley: Pushing through the fear
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 18:00:35 Z
First, a flash of red. Then, the barrel of a gun. The figure is darting too quickly between cars to make out his face, demeanour, intentions. I am in one of those cars, and there’s nowhere to drive but straight ahead, towards the gun. Except no one is driving at all: we are stuck. Vehicles […]
Submit News to CKA News Front Page: I Know That Land
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:59:10 Z
The Citizen’s front page on Saturday was a dramatic photo by Bruno Schlumberger of the National War Memorial at dusk on Friday, with a poem by Canadian author Alan Cumyn.   I Know That Land I know that land. I stood there years ago and watched the tears on Nana’s face as she remembered a […]
Submit News to CKA News Ottawa gunman hit by several volleys from security forces before fatal shot
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 13:47:00 EDT

OTTAWA—The gunman who charged into Parliament after shooting a Canadian Forces reservist was struck by nearly a dozen bullets from security officers and finally was brought down by Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers.

Several sources, who have requested anonymity, have confirmed to The Canadian Press that Michael Zehaf Bibeau was fatally wounded by Vickers near the door of the Parliamentary library.

Police have said that Vickers was involved in Wednesday’s gunfight with Zehaf Bibeau.

Security video released by the RCMP on Thursday showed Zehaf Bibeau’s deadly race from the National War Memorial after he shot Cpl. Nathan Cirillo and hijacked a ministerial car before bursting into the Parliament buildings.

He ran in to Parliament’s Centre Block through the main entrance with RCMP officers in hot pursuit.

The RCMP is charged with assuring the security of the exterior of the Parliament buildings.

A security service source says the gunman was intercepted by a House of Commons security guard who unsuccessfully tried to wrestle his gun away from him.

The guard yelled “Gun!” to warn his colleagues and tried to yank the barrel of the weapon down but Zehaf Bibeau managed to fire, wounding the man.

The gunman then bolted several metres down the Hall of Honour with police and guards chasing him. Shots were fired.

Zehaf Bibeau, his body riddled with bullets, huddled behind a column by the Parliamentary library. It was there that Vickers fired the fatal shots.

The slaying of Cirillo was the second killing of a soldier this week.

On Monday, Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent, 53, was fatally injured when a man identified as Martin Rouleau used his vehicle to run him and a colleague down in a parking lot of a federal building south of Montreal.

Rouleau, 25, fled the scene but was later shot dead after a pursuit in which his car rolled over. Friends said he had become increasingly radicalized.

Submit News to CKA News Hockey returns to Ottawa to take its place in healing process
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 13:10:00 -0400
The Ottawa Senators hope they can do their part in the process of mourning Cpl. Nathan Cirillo on Saturday night and help the nation's capital come together after this week's shooting on Parliament Hill.
Submit News to CKA News Be afraid, eh: Ghost stories from across Canada
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 13:00:29 -0400

Be afraid, Canada. Be very afraid. You can't escape the things that go bump after dark. There's hardly a community in this country that doesn't have a ghost story to tell.
Submit News to CKA News Jack Bruce, bassist from legendary 1960s band Cream, dead at 71
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:24:09 EDT

LONDON—British musician Jack Bruce, best known as the bassist and vocalist of the 1960s power blues trio Cream, died Saturday at his home. He was 71.

Bruce was one of the top musicians of the late 1960s, when Cream played its unique psychedelic blues tunes to packed houses in England and the United States.

The short-lived band — widely cited as the original supergroup — were known for hits such as “I Feel Free” and “Sunshine of Your Love,” which featured Eric Clapton’s innovative guitar riffs, and Bruce’s vocals and roaring bass, backed by Ginger Baker’s explosive drumming.

Bruce enjoyed a long solo career after that, and in 2005 he reunited with former Cream bandmates for concerts in London and New York City.

Publicist Claire Singers said Saturday Bruce died at his home in Suffolk, England. A statement released by his family said “the world of music will be a poorer place without him but he lives on in his music and forever in our hearts.

“It is with great sadness that we, Jack’s family, announce the passing of our beloved Jack: husband, father, granddad, and all round legend,” the statement said.

Cream sold 35 million albums in just over two years and the band was awarded the world’s first ever platinum disc for their double albumWheels of Fire. Bruce wrote and sang most of the band’s signature songs.

The band started out playing traditional blues tunes, but added a psychedelic tinge that brought still more popularity at the height of the flower power era.

But they broke up with little warning, at the height of their commercial success. Clapton wrote in his 2007 autobiography that the band lost its direction musically and that “any sense of unity” had disappeared.

“We were also suffering from an inability to get along,” he said. “We would just run away from one another. We never socialized together and never really shared ideas anymore.”

Bruce went on to record the first of his solo albums, Songs For a Tailor. He also fronted many of his own bands.

He was known for mixing rock, jazz and classical formats, and his songs were covered by many artists including Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie and Ella Fitzgerald.

Bruce returned to the studio around 2000 to record his solo album Shadows in the Air, which hit No. 5 on the British jazz and blues chart.

Bruce was born to musical parents in Glasgow, Scotland on May 14, 1943. His parents travelled extensively in Canada and the U.S., and the young Bruce attended 14 different schools. He finished his formal education at Bellahouston Academy and the Royal Scottish Academy of Music, to which he won a scholarship for cello and composition.

He left Scotland at the age of 16 and in 1962 joined his first important band, the influential Alexis Korner’s Blues Inc., in London. The band featured drummer Charlie Watts, who later joined the Rolling Stones.

He is survived by his wife, Margrit, four children and a granddaughter. Funeral arrangements weren’t immediately announced.

Submit News to CKA News Parliament Hill re-opens to public with tours to resume Monday
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:20:55 +0000

Parliament Hill had been off limits in the wake of the fatal shooting of a soldier at the National War Memorial

The post Parliament Hill re-opens to public with tours to resume Monday appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Tours to resume Monday as Parliament Hill reopens following shootings (with video)
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:12:21 Z
Public tours of Parliament Hill are to resume Monday, as the area was reopened Saturday following last week’s shootings. Speaker Andrew Scheer said the decision was made after consulting with security officials, but some additional measures will be taken, including locking all the entrances to buildings in the Parliamentary precinct between 10 p.m. and 6 […]
Submit News to CKA News Parliament Hill again open to the public; tours to resume Monday
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 11:14:41 EDT

OTTAWA—The grounds of Parliament Hill have reopened to the public and the Speaker says tours are to resume on Monday.

Parliament Hill had been off limits until Friday night in the wake of the fatal shooting of a soldier at the National War Memorial and the killing of his assailant in the Commons Centre Block on Wednesday.

Speaker Andrew Scheer says visitors and House of Commons employees can expect to see heightened RCMP presence at entrances to buildings in the Parliamentary Precinct.

Scheer says counselling sessions will be held on Monday and Tuesday for Commons staff.

Cpl. Nathan Cirillo — the honour guard at the National War Memorial — was gunned down by a mentally unstable homeless man with a rifle.

Gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was shot dead by Kevin Vickers, the sergeant-at-arms of the House of Commons, after he’d entered Centre Block through the front doors, with RCMP in hot pursuit.

Submit News to CKA News 'Yesterday, reality replaced fiction': Parliament Hill security officer (with video)
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 15:07:24 Z
Parliament Hill security officer Louis Létourneau has replayed the scenario in his head for years.
Submit News to CKA News Parliament Hill re-opens to the public; tours to resume Monday
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 10:56:00 -0400
The grounds of Parliament Hill have reopened to the public and the Speaker says tours are to resume on Monday.
Submit News to CKA News Public health agencies should prioritize infectious diseases
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:55:36 +0000

The Editorial: The seriousness of the Ebola outbreak should motivate public health agencies to focus on fighting infectious disease

The post Public health agencies should prioritize infectious diseases appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Visitors flock to reopened Parliament Hill
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 10:52:45 -0400
Area had been off limits until Friday night in the wake of the fatal shooting of a soldier at the National War Memorial
Submit News to CKA News ?No shortage of volunteers? for clinical trial of Canadian-made Ebola vaccine
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 10:51:24 EDT

The risk of contracting Ebola virus in suburban Washington, D.C., is vanishingly low. In fact, with the recovery and Friday’s release from hospital there of Dallas nurse Nina Pham, it is actually nil.

But that fact isn’t deterring people from stepping forward to volunteer for one of 78 spots in two clinical trials of an experimental Ebola vaccine designed by scientists at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

The clinical trials are being conducted in Bethesda, Md., a science hub that is home to the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the two facilities doing the research.

Ninety minutes drive away, straight up highway 270, is the U.S. army Medical Research Institute on Infectious Diseases, where one of the strains of Ebola — Ebola Reston — was first identified in monkeys imported from the Philippines. Scientists at USAMRIID, as it is known, collaborated with the Winnipeg lab in the making of the Canadian vaccine.

In other words, this is a nexus of the high calibre research, with many laboratories devoted to work on very bad bugs. And scientists in the labs who study Ebola and its cousin, the Marburg virus, have waited a long time for a chance to be vaccinated against the deadly viruses they research.

“We’re not short of volunteers,” says Col. Shon Remich, director of translational medicine at Walter Reed and an associate investigator on one of the trials.

“A lot of people want to be part of the solution,” says Remich, who acknowledges he wishes he could volunteer to take the vaccine.

That’s not to say researchers are the only volunteers for the trials, or that volunteers are only being drawn from the research community. Organizers of the trials are looking for healthy adults — 18 to 65 for the NIH trial, 18 to 50 at Walter Reed.

They want a mix of men and women, but are excluding pregnant women and medical professionals currently caring for patients. People who work with animals, take care of children under five or live with anyone who has a suppressed immune system are not eligible for the NIH trial.

Those exclusions are because the vaccine contains live virus — though not, of course, Ebola virus. This vaccine cannot give a recipient Ebola disease.

Still, there is some possibility recipients will emit or “shed” the viruses the vaccine does contain. The researchers are being cautious. This is, after all, the first time this vaccine has been tested in people.

The vaccine, which the Canadian government licensed to NewLink Genetics of Ames, Iowa, is called VSV-ZEBOV. The VSV part of the name is short for vesicular stomatitis virus, a live animal virus that is harmless to humans.

It has been genetically modified so that it produces a protein made by Ebola viruses, in this case the Zaire strain of Ebola which is the one responsible for the West African outbreak. That’s the Z (Zaire) EBOV (Ebola virus) part of the name.

Introducing that protein to recipients’ immune systems should trigger the production of antibodies which would then mount up to fight off Ebola Zaire, if the recipient ever encounters it. Encountering it, though, is not part of these studies. While challenge studies are used for some mild pathogens — vaccinated volunteers are exposed to a pathogen to see if the vaccine works — that would never be done with something as dangerous as Ebola.

In these studies, the researchers will look for antibodies to the Ebola protein in blood drawn from the volunteers and will watch to see if antibody levels rise over time.

Volunteers will get either the vaccine or an injection of a placebo, probably saline. The primary goal is to see if people can safely take this vaccine. So far, some of the people who have received injections have experienced low grade fevers and muscle aches — the type of reaction one often sees in people who get vaccinated for anything. They are actually signs the vaccine is working.

Both trials are starting with low doses and are working their way up to higher doses only after it is determined if low doses are tolerable. That approach is called a “safety stagger,” says Remich. A safety review committee will assess the first dose results before the trial organizers can move up to the next dose.

“The protocol is written to be cautious, so there is a stepwise enrolment,” explains Dr. John Beigel, an associate investigator on the NIH trial.

“The last thing you want to do is vaccinate 50 people all in one day and then find that it’s really toxic.”

One of the challenges with a new vaccine or drug is determining what constitutes a dose. How much is needed to get the desired effect? How little can you give, so you can minimize the risk of side-effects while still getting a protective effect?

“We’re trying to find that sweet spot in the middle where we generate antibodies but the side-effects are tolerable,” Beigel explains.

The Walter Reed study is testing what happens when recipients receive only one dose of the vaccine, which many — including the scientist who led the development program — hope will be sufficient for this vaccine. A one-dose vaccine is much easier to administer, especially in emergency circumstances, than a two-dose vaccine, especially if the doses have to be given several weeks apart.

The NIH study is looking at a two-dose regimen, trying to see if two low doses — given 28 days apart — would be as effective as a single dose that contains more vaccine than the two combined. It would be a way to stretch scarce vaccine, Beigel says.

Each study has three arms, which will receive a low, intermediate or high dose (or two) of vaccine. In the NIH trial, the intermediate dose is seven times larger than the low dose, and the high dose is five times higher than the intermediate. In the Walter Reed study, the intermediate and high doses involve 10 times more vaccine than the dose below.

In both trials, 10 people each will receive the low, intermediate and high doses, and nine people will receive placebo. Neither the researchers nor the recipients will know until after the results have been calculated who got which.

Both hope to have some data on the safety of the vaccine and information that can be used to make a decision about the size of a dose in December, though the results of the analysis of the impact of the second dose in the NIH study aren’t expected until January, Beigel says.

The Walter Reed trial will follow volunteers for 180 days, drawing blood at sporadic intervals over that time. The NIH trial will follow its volunteers for a year to try to get a picture of how long the Ebola antibodies stick around.

Additional safety trials of the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine will soon start in Germany, Switzerland, Gabon and Kenya. The World Health Organization said Friday that much larger trials aimed at seeing if the vaccine is protective could start in December or shortly thereafter, depending on the safety trials results.

Submit News to CKA News Colleagues of American doctor with Ebola say he took precautions
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:50:42 +0000

CONAKRY, Guinea – An American doctor who caught Ebola while treating patients in Guinea was a hard worker who conscientiously followed safety procedures, two colleagues said Saturday. Craig Spencer is…

The post Colleagues of American doctor with Ebola say he took precautions appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Ottawa gunman's mad charge took less than 90 seconds (with video)
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:41:45 Z
Michael Zehaf-Bibeau took the simplest route in attacking the House of Commons, yet probably the most effective: He ran. A single-minded and suicidal charge, it took only a minute and 23 seconds from the time he stopped his car on Wellington Street — moments after killing a soldier at the National War Memorial — until he had rushed through the […]
Submit News to CKA News Gunman asked to borrow car 'for one day,' then bought it for $650 (with video)
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:38:45 Z
Gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau asked for a one-day loan of the car he used in his attack on the National War Memorial and Parliament Hill but ended up haggling down the price and paying cash for the rusting Toyota sedan.
Submit News to CKA News Omnibus budget bill restricts refugee access to social assistance
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:32:39 +0000

The bill would lift the prohibition on minimum residency, ending the national standard for supporting refugee claimants in need

The post Omnibus budget bill restricts refugee access to social assistance appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Canadian Editorial/Opinion Newswatch

Warning: MagpieRSS: Failed to parse RSS file. (Undeclared entity error at line 56, column 54) in D:\Hosted Sites\canadaka.net\www\includes\rss_fetch\rss_fetch.inc on line 238 Submit News to CKA News In Toronto, a vote is a terrible thing to waste: Cohn
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 17:26:12 EDT

There’s a reason turnout will be unusually high in Monday’s mayoral race. And that voting in advance polls has set new records.

More Torontonians than ever want their votes to count. Count me among them.

A vote is a terrible thing to waste at any time. But this time, after four lost years of mayoral madness, the stakes are higher than ever.

Unlike conventional elections, where voters evaluate competing platforms and choose from among rival candidates, this vote is a clear referendum on the Ford brothers: Who best to banish their toxic legacy?

Say what you will about third-place Olivia Chow, with all her strengths and weaknesses, every poll suggests she is simply not up to the task at hand: putting Toronto out of its misery by putting the Fords out to pasture. Trailing badly, she cannot possibly overtake her two main rivals.

As the front-runner, John Tory is best placed to deliver the coup de grace, gracefully. He is not only exceedingly qualified to be an excellent mayor at a troubled time, he is the only one in a position to defeat Doug Ford (open Doug Ford's policard) — whom the polls show is still within striking distance.

Politics is a tough game — an unforgiving fusion of personalities, ideologies and chronologies. Timing is everything in politics, and this is simply not Chow’s time.

It’s time to rid us of the Fords. When Karen Stintz (open Karen Stintz's policard) was trailing, she recognized that bracing reality and quietly dropped out. So too did David Soknacki when he realized he couldn’t win.

Chow’s progressive supporters can intellectualize, rationalize or fantasize about fidelity to their cause. But nothing else counts as much as defeating the Fords.

If she is doomed on voting day, it matters not whether Chow has an appealing platform on transit. As vital as transit is to this gridlocked city, nothing will move forward until the political gridlock fostered by the Fords is pushed aside.

Chow might make a fine mayor, but she is not up to the job of dislodging the Fords — and healing the urban-suburban divide they so shamelessly exploited. Now, Torontonians need not just unity but sanity and probity.

Tory can deliver on all three.

He is eminently practical and ethical. He can play the role of conciliator and facilitator that our divided city council badly needs. He understands public policy and fiscal reality.

Yes, he has a patrician bearing, after being raised as a blue blood. But he has spent a lifetime immersing himself in public life.

As for the phony rhetoric that Tory is elitist? The Fords are rich kids disguised as faux populists. And Chow is NDP royalty, surely interwoven with the political elites that bestride the country.

All three candidates live in a rarefied world of advisers, handlers, donors and fawners. To claim only Tory is of the elites is like labelling Chow ambitious — it’s beside the point, because it applies to all politicians.

Explaining how they cast their ballots in 2010, many reluctant supporters of far-right Rob Ford (open Rob Ford's policard) or left-leaning candidate Joe Pantalone claimed they just couldn’t bring themselves to back George Smitherman, the abrasive centrist. In the 2014 race, thankfully, Tory has nothing like Smitherman’s negatives, and enough positives to prevail over the folly of the Fords.

He is decent, dignified, dedicated, intelligent, honest and earnest. He may not be my first choice for mayor (personally, I liked Soknacki’s quixotic realism, but as a realist he wisely withdrew his candidacy). But Tory is quite simply the best choice in the circumstances.

Yes, I confess to being a so-called strategic voter because to me, politics is the art of the possible. Until we come up with a ranked ballot (electronic runoff), there is no shame in choosing a candidate who possesses both wisdom and winnability — for one without the other is a losing proposition.

Isn’t Tory coasting to victory anyway? Can’t progressives stick with Chow till the bitter end, confident that Tory will ultimately knock off Ford for us all?

It might feel comforting to prop up the progressive banner, but complacency comes at a high price. History proves that polling is an unpredictable business. Only an overconfident risk-taker would conclude that Doug Ford cannot possibly pull off an upset victory on voting day if Chow splits the anti-Ford vote.

Voting for a third-place also-ran would be a reckless gamble in Toronto’s game of high stakes poker. If the outcome is four more lost years, how will Torontonians forgive themselves for folding their hand and throwing the game?

As a Queen’s Park columnist, I suppose I should be careful what I wish for: If Tory triumphs on Monday, Doug Ford may yet carry out his perennial threat to seek the leadership of Ontario’s Progressive Conservatives — for whom he once prescribed “an enema from top to bottom.”

Should he win next year’s PC leadership convention, he’ll surely make my life miserable. But it’s a price I’d cheerfully pay to spare Toronto any more misery …

More seriously: Please vote!

Martin Regg Cohn?s Ontario politics column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. mcohn@thestar.ca , Twitter: @reggcohn

Submit News to CKA News John Tory releases list of campaign donors ? with a lot of big names
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:42:13 EDT

Frontrunning mayoral candidate John Tory has released his list of campaign donors that includes a number of heavy hitters from the business world.

The Tory campaign said it has received more than 5,000 donations totalling $2.48 million so far. A final tally will be released after Monday’s election.

Tory followed Olivia Chow, who released her donors last week showing she had raised $1.76 million as of Oct. 21. Candidate Doug Ford (open Doug Ford's policard) promised that he would release his list on Saturday as well.

Ford took the opportunity to deride Tory’s financial backers as people who are looking for “favours” from city hall.

“All those people are coming to city hall, the taxpayers, with their hat in hand waiting for the favours to be handed out,” Ford told reporters on the campaign trail.

“It’s pretty simple,” Ford continued. “He has $2.4 million. That’s a lot of favours in my opinion.”

Tory said he was gratified by the campaign’s success raising money, including support from “lots of people” who gave small amounts.

“We had people come into our office with $10 in cash to give us,” he said. “We raised the money we needed to finance the campaign, and we’ll probably have a surplus in fact.”

“I just would say that he (Ford) shouldn’t say things like that because I think it demeans everybody in the process to even suggest that kind of thing.”

The list of donors revealed a slew of prominent names from the business world, both active and retired.

Sports Management: Tom Anselmi, Paul Beeston, Larry Tanenbaum.

Politics: John Carmichael, Martha Hall Findlay, Linda Frum, Ernie Hardemann, Chin Lee (open Chin Lee's policard), Darcy McKeough, David Peterson, Frank McKenna.

Broadcasting: Phil Lind, Edward Rogers, Allan Slaight, Ivan Fecan, Richard Stursberg.

Real Estate Development/investment: Shane Baghai, Andrew Barnicke, J. Lorne Braithwaite, Rudolph Bratty, Mitch Goldhar, Cary Green, Jon Love, Alan Menkes, Albert Reichmann, Bryan Tuckey, Silvio De Gasperis, Leo Del Zotto, Julie Di Lorenzo, Steve Diamond, Stuart Lazier.

Business/Bay St.: Brent Belzberg, John Bitove Jr., John Bitove Sr., Michael Bregman, Paul Bronfman, Gordon Nixon, W. Edmund Clark, John E. Cleghorn, Jack Cockwell, J. Trevor Eyton, Anthony Fell, George Fierheller, J. Bruce Flatt, Ira Gluskin, Peter Godsoe, Blake Goldring, Richard Ivey, Henry Jackman, Michael McCain, Michael Nobrega, Seymour Shulich, Barbara Stymiest, W. Galen Weston, Charles Winograd, Dennis Fotinos.

Law: Mary Flynn-Guglietti, Brian Greenspan, Clifford Lax, Roy McMurtry, Jane Pepino, Arthur Scace.

Politics: John Carmichael, Martha Hall Findlay, Linda Frum, Ernie Hardemann, Chin Lee, Darcy McKeough, David Peterson, Frank McKenna.

Lobbying/government relations: Paul Christie, Terry Mundell, Harry Near.

Theatre: Aubrey Dan.

Other: Children’s rights activist Marc Kielburger.

Submit News to CKA News 5 injured in explosion at Sarnia industrial site
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 16:33:29 EDT

SARNIA, ONT.—The mayor of this southwestern Ontario city says five people have been sent to hospital after an explosion at an industrial facility.

Mayor Mike Bradley said the explosion occurred Saturday afternoon at the Veolia ES Canada Industrial Services Inc. plant.

He said one person was critically injured in the blast, while three suffered serious injuries and one has minor injuries.

The fire is out and the scene is now “under control,” he said. There was major damage to the plant.

Fire and emergency services are at the scene.

Submit News to CKA News Sexual assault suspect arrested and charged after Yonge St. incident
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 14:45:21 EDT

A man has been arrested and charged with sexual assault following an incident near Yonge St. and Finch Ave. early Saturday morning.

It is alleged that, at about 3:50 a.m., a 30-year-old female victim was walking when a male approached from behind and assaulted her. The victim fought with the man, and he fled the scene.

Mark Towell, 37, of Richmond Hill was arrested in the area after police were contacted. He will appear in court at Old City Hall on Sunday.

Submit News to CKA News Ottawa gunman hit by several volleys from security forces before fatal shot
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 13:47:00 EDT

OTTAWA—The gunman who charged into Parliament after shooting a Canadian Forces reservist was struck by nearly a dozen bullets from security officers and finally was brought down by Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers.

Several sources, who have requested anonymity, have confirmed to The Canadian Press that Michael Zehaf Bibeau was fatally wounded by Vickers near the door of the Parliamentary library.

Police have said that Vickers was involved in Wednesday’s gunfight with Zehaf Bibeau.

Security video released by the RCMP on Thursday showed Zehaf Bibeau’s deadly race from the National War Memorial after he shot Cpl. Nathan Cirillo and hijacked a ministerial car before bursting into the Parliament buildings.

He ran in to Parliament’s Centre Block through the main entrance with RCMP officers in hot pursuit.

The RCMP is charged with assuring the security of the exterior of the Parliament buildings.

A security service source says the gunman was intercepted by a House of Commons security guard who unsuccessfully tried to wrestle his gun away from him.

The guard yelled “Gun!” to warn his colleagues and tried to yank the barrel of the weapon down but Zehaf Bibeau managed to fire, wounding the man.

The gunman then bolted several metres down the Hall of Honour with police and guards chasing him. Shots were fired.

Zehaf Bibeau, his body riddled with bullets, huddled behind a column by the Parliamentary library. It was there that Vickers fired the fatal shots.

The slaying of Cirillo was the second killing of a soldier this week.

On Monday, Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent, 53, was fatally injured when a man identified as Martin Rouleau used his vehicle to run him and a colleague down in a parking lot of a federal building south of Montreal.

Rouleau, 25, fled the scene but was later shot dead after a pursuit in which his car rolled over. Friends said he had become increasingly radicalized.

Submit News to CKA News Jack Bruce, bassist from legendary 1960s band Cream, dead at 71
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 12:24:09 EDT

LONDON—British musician Jack Bruce, best known as the bassist and vocalist of the 1960s power blues trio Cream, died Saturday at his home. He was 71.

Bruce was one of the top musicians of the late 1960s, when Cream played its unique psychedelic blues tunes to packed houses in England and the United States.

The short-lived band — widely cited as the original supergroup — were known for hits such as “I Feel Free” and “Sunshine of Your Love,” which featured Eric Clapton’s innovative guitar riffs, and Bruce’s vocals and roaring bass, backed by Ginger Baker’s explosive drumming.

Bruce enjoyed a long solo career after that, and in 2005 he reunited with former Cream bandmates for concerts in London and New York City.

Publicist Claire Singers said Saturday Bruce died at his home in Suffolk, England. A statement released by his family said “the world of music will be a poorer place without him but he lives on in his music and forever in our hearts.

“It is with great sadness that we, Jack’s family, announce the passing of our beloved Jack: husband, father, granddad, and all round legend,” the statement said.

Cream sold 35 million albums in just over two years and the band was awarded the world’s first ever platinum disc for their double albumWheels of Fire. Bruce wrote and sang most of the band’s signature songs.

The band started out playing traditional blues tunes, but added a psychedelic tinge that brought still more popularity at the height of the flower power era.

But they broke up with little warning, at the height of their commercial success. Clapton wrote in his 2007 autobiography that the band lost its direction musically and that “any sense of unity” had disappeared.

“We were also suffering from an inability to get along,” he said. “We would just run away from one another. We never socialized together and never really shared ideas anymore.”

Bruce went on to record the first of his solo albums, Songs For a Tailor. He also fronted many of his own bands.

He was known for mixing rock, jazz and classical formats, and his songs were covered by many artists including Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie and Ella Fitzgerald.

Bruce returned to the studio around 2000 to record his solo album Shadows in the Air, which hit No. 5 on the British jazz and blues chart.

Bruce was born to musical parents in Glasgow, Scotland on May 14, 1943. His parents travelled extensively in Canada and the U.S., and the young Bruce attended 14 different schools. He finished his formal education at Bellahouston Academy and the Royal Scottish Academy of Music, to which he won a scholarship for cello and composition.

He left Scotland at the age of 16 and in 1962 joined his first important band, the influential Alexis Korner’s Blues Inc., in London. The band featured drummer Charlie Watts, who later joined the Rolling Stones.

He is survived by his wife, Margrit, four children and a granddaughter. Funeral arrangements weren’t immediately announced.

Submit News to CKA News Parliament Hill again open to the public; tours to resume Monday
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 11:14:41 EDT

OTTAWA—The grounds of Parliament Hill have reopened to the public and the Speaker says tours are to resume on Monday.

Parliament Hill had been off limits until Friday night in the wake of the fatal shooting of a soldier at the National War Memorial and the killing of his assailant in the Commons Centre Block on Wednesday.

Speaker Andrew Scheer says visitors and House of Commons employees can expect to see heightened RCMP presence at entrances to buildings in the Parliamentary Precinct.

Scheer says counselling sessions will be held on Monday and Tuesday for Commons staff.

Cpl. Nathan Cirillo — the honour guard at the National War Memorial — was gunned down by a mentally unstable homeless man with a rifle.

Gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau was shot dead by Kevin Vickers, the sergeant-at-arms of the House of Commons, after he’d entered Centre Block through the front doors, with RCMP in hot pursuit.

Submit News to CKA News ?No shortage of volunteers? for clinical trial of Canadian-made Ebola vaccine
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 10:51:24 EDT

The risk of contracting Ebola virus in suburban Washington, D.C., is vanishingly low. In fact, with the recovery and Friday’s release from hospital there of Dallas nurse Nina Pham, it is actually nil.

But that fact isn’t deterring people from stepping forward to volunteer for one of 78 spots in two clinical trials of an experimental Ebola vaccine designed by scientists at the National Microbiology Laboratory in Winnipeg.

The clinical trials are being conducted in Bethesda, Md., a science hub that is home to the U.S. National Institutes of Health and the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, the two facilities doing the research.

Ninety minutes drive away, straight up highway 270, is the U.S. army Medical Research Institute on Infectious Diseases, where one of the strains of Ebola — Ebola Reston — was first identified in monkeys imported from the Philippines. Scientists at USAMRIID, as it is known, collaborated with the Winnipeg lab in the making of the Canadian vaccine.

In other words, this is a nexus of the high calibre research, with many laboratories devoted to work on very bad bugs. And scientists in the labs who study Ebola and its cousin, the Marburg virus, have waited a long time for a chance to be vaccinated against the deadly viruses they research.

“We’re not short of volunteers,” says Col. Shon Remich, director of translational medicine at Walter Reed and an associate investigator on one of the trials.

“A lot of people want to be part of the solution,” says Remich, who acknowledges he wishes he could volunteer to take the vaccine.

That’s not to say researchers are the only volunteers for the trials, or that volunteers are only being drawn from the research community. Organizers of the trials are looking for healthy adults — 18 to 65 for the NIH trial, 18 to 50 at Walter Reed.

They want a mix of men and women, but are excluding pregnant women and medical professionals currently caring for patients. People who work with animals, take care of children under five or live with anyone who has a suppressed immune system are not eligible for the NIH trial.

Those exclusions are because the vaccine contains live virus — though not, of course, Ebola virus. This vaccine cannot give a recipient Ebola disease.

Still, there is some possibility recipients will emit or “shed” the viruses the vaccine does contain. The researchers are being cautious. This is, after all, the first time this vaccine has been tested in people.

The vaccine, which the Canadian government licensed to NewLink Genetics of Ames, Iowa, is called VSV-ZEBOV. The VSV part of the name is short for vesicular stomatitis virus, a live animal virus that is harmless to humans.

It has been genetically modified so that it produces a protein made by Ebola viruses, in this case the Zaire strain of Ebola which is the one responsible for the West African outbreak. That’s the Z (Zaire) EBOV (Ebola virus) part of the name.

Introducing that protein to recipients’ immune systems should trigger the production of antibodies which would then mount up to fight off Ebola Zaire, if the recipient ever encounters it. Encountering it, though, is not part of these studies. While challenge studies are used for some mild pathogens — vaccinated volunteers are exposed to a pathogen to see if the vaccine works — that would never be done with something as dangerous as Ebola.

In these studies, the researchers will look for antibodies to the Ebola protein in blood drawn from the volunteers and will watch to see if antibody levels rise over time.

Volunteers will get either the vaccine or an injection of a placebo, probably saline. The primary goal is to see if people can safely take this vaccine. So far, some of the people who have received injections have experienced low grade fevers and muscle aches — the type of reaction one often sees in people who get vaccinated for anything. They are actually signs the vaccine is working.

Both trials are starting with low doses and are working their way up to higher doses only after it is determined if low doses are tolerable. That approach is called a “safety stagger,” says Remich. A safety review committee will assess the first dose results before the trial organizers can move up to the next dose.

“The protocol is written to be cautious, so there is a stepwise enrolment,” explains Dr. John Beigel, an associate investigator on the NIH trial.

“The last thing you want to do is vaccinate 50 people all in one day and then find that it’s really toxic.”

One of the challenges with a new vaccine or drug is determining what constitutes a dose. How much is needed to get the desired effect? How little can you give, so you can minimize the risk of side-effects while still getting a protective effect?

“We’re trying to find that sweet spot in the middle where we generate antibodies but the side-effects are tolerable,” Beigel explains.

The Walter Reed study is testing what happens when recipients receive only one dose of the vaccine, which many — including the scientist who led the development program — hope will be sufficient for this vaccine. A one-dose vaccine is much easier to administer, especially in emergency circumstances, than a two-dose vaccine, especially if the doses have to be given several weeks apart.

The NIH study is looking at a two-dose regimen, trying to see if two low doses — given 28 days apart — would be as effective as a single dose that contains more vaccine than the two combined. It would be a way to stretch scarce vaccine, Beigel says.

Each study has three arms, which will receive a low, intermediate or high dose (or two) of vaccine. In the NIH trial, the intermediate dose is seven times larger than the low dose, and the high dose is five times higher than the intermediate. In the Walter Reed study, the intermediate and high doses involve 10 times more vaccine than the dose below.

In both trials, 10 people each will receive the low, intermediate and high doses, and nine people will receive placebo. Neither the researchers nor the recipients will know until after the results have been calculated who got which.

Both hope to have some data on the safety of the vaccine and information that can be used to make a decision about the size of a dose in December, though the results of the analysis of the impact of the second dose in the NIH study aren’t expected until January, Beigel says.

The Walter Reed trial will follow volunteers for 180 days, drawing blood at sporadic intervals over that time. The NIH trial will follow its volunteers for a year to try to get a picture of how long the Ebola antibodies stick around.

Additional safety trials of the VSV-ZEBOV vaccine will soon start in Germany, Switzerland, Gabon and Kenya. The World Health Organization said Friday that much larger trials aimed at seeing if the vaccine is protective could start in December or shortly thereafter, depending on the safety trials results.

Submit News to CKA News Washington school shooter had recently been named homecoming prince
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 09:22:16 EDT

MARYSVILLE, WASH.—Jaylen Fryberg was well liked and athletic, a football player named to his high school’s homecoming court just one week ago.

He was also facing problems, writing of some unspecified troubles on his Twitter feed: “It breaks me ... It actually does ...”

The popular Marysville-Pilchuck High School freshman opened fire in the school’s cafeteria late Friday morning, a government official with direct knowledge of the shooting told The Associated Press.

One girl was killed and four other young people — including two of the gunman’s cousins — were badly wounded before Fryberg fatally shot himself, witnesses, police and relatives said.

His motives remained unclear. Some students described Fryberg as happy and social, even though he had recently fought with a boy over a girl.

Shaylee Bass, a 15-year-old sophomore, said he remained upset about that, but she was stunned by the shooting.

“He was not a violent person,” she said. “His family is known all around town. He was very well known. That’s what makes it so bizarre.”

Students said the gunman stared at his victims as he fired. The shootings set off a chaotic scene as students ran from the cafeteria and building in a frantic dash to safety, while others huddled inside classrooms at the school 30 miles north of Seattle.

Marysville police declined to release the shooter’s identity, with Chief Rick Smith insisting he did not want to “dramatize someone who perpetuated a violent crime in a place where children should feel safe.”

But many students identified Fryberg as the gunman, and the identity was confirmed to The Associated Press by a government official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

Students and parents said Fryberg was a member of a prominent family from the nearby Tulalip Indian tribes and was a freshman football player. A week ago, he stood on the high school track during the team’s homecoming game in a vest, tie and white sash as he was introduced as a prince, according to a video recorded by parent Jim McGauhey.

Marysville Police Commander Robb Lamoureux said the gunman died of a self-inflicted wound, but he could not provide more details.

Three of the victims had head wounds and were in critical condition. Two unidentified young women were at Providence Everett Medical Center, and 15-year-old Andrew Fryberg was at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, a hospital official said.

Another victim, 14-year-old Nate Hatch, was listed in serious condition at Harborview, the hospital said. Family members told KIRO-TV that Andrew Fryberg and Hatch are cousins of Jaylen Fryberg.

Witnesses described the shooter as methodical inside the cafeteria.

Isabella MacKeige, 18, was having lunch with a friend when they suddenly heard gunshots behind them.

“I heard six shots go off and I turned and saw people diving under the tables,” she told The Associated Press. “In my brain I thought ‘run!’ So I left my backpack, my phone and my purse and got out the door as fast as I could.”

Some students got hurt when they tripped and fell in the chaos, she said. They ran across an open field to the fence that circles the schoolyard and climbed over.

She kept running until she felt safe and found a phone.

“I called my mom and she said, ‘stay where you are — I don’t want to lose you,’ ” MacKeige said.

Brian Patrick said his daughter, a freshman, was 3 metres from the gunman. She ran from the cafeteria and immediately called her mother.

Patrick said his daughter told him, “The guy walked into the cafeteria, pulled out a gun and started shooting. No arguing, no yelling.”

A crowd of parents later waited in a parking lot outside a nearby church where they were reunited with their children.

Patrick said after the shooting that his other daughter, a senior at the school, was “hysterical” when she called him from her classroom.

“I thought, ‘God let my kids be safe,’ ” he said.

Fryberg’s Twitter feed suggested he was struggling with an unidentified problem.

On Wednesday, a posting read: “It won’t last ... It’ll never last.” On Monday, another said: “I should have listened. ... You were right ... The whole time you were right.”

Marysville-Pilchuck High School has a number of students from the Tulalip Indian tribes.

Ron Iukes, a youth counsellor with the tribe, said Jaylen Fryberg was from a well-known tribal family.

“They’re real good people, very loving,” he said. “Jaylen was one of our good kids.”

State Sen. John McCoy, a tribal member, said the tribal community was devastated. “We’re all related in one shape or form. We live and work and play together.”

Hundreds of people prayed and sang songs at a church vigil Friday night for victims and family members.

The Oak Harbor high school football team, which had been set to play Marysville Friday night, lined the front row of Grove Church in their purple jerseys. The game was cancelled and Oak Harbor offered to give the win to Marysville.

Pastor Nik Baumgart told the overflow crowd there was no script for reacting to Friday’s events.

“One moment we’re thinking, we can do this,” Baumgart said. “Another moment, we’re thinking, how can we do this?”

Submit News to CKA News Case closed on lawyers in Mike Duffy-Nigel Wright affair
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 09:00:00 EDT

Last November, a University of Ottawa law professor filed complaints of professional misconduct against two lawyers for their alleged role in the Senate expense scandal.

Beyond questioning the ethics of the lawyers involved, Amir Attaran, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Law, Population Health and Global Development Policy, said he wanted to probe the effectiveness of the law societies responsible for protecting the public.

Suspended senator Mike Duffy is now facing 31 criminal counts of fraud, breach of trust and bribery, involving a $90,000 payment from Stephen Harper’s former chief of staff, Nigel Wright.

The Star has confirmed that neither of the lawyers who were allegedly aware of the terms of the payment will face a formal disciplinary hearing. But because of the secrecy shrouding complaints against lawyers, very little has emerged about the investigations.

Attaran, who only learned the complaints had been dismissed as a result of media inquiries, said there are still many unanswered questions.

“I’ve never heard anything from the investigators,” he said. “I don’t know whether the investigators have even interviewed the persons in question. I don’t know if the investigators have spoken with the RCMP.

“It’s a black box.”

In his complaints to the law societies in B.C. and Ontario, Attaran alleged that lawyers Janice Payne and Benjamin Perrin “violated the ethics of their profession” for their alleged role in negotiating the $90,000 payment from Wright to Duffy.

“A lawyer cannot facilitate the illegal activities of his or her client,” the complaint states. “I believe both lawyers knew enough to discern the possible illegality of the deal being struck.”

Law societies in both provinces make clear in their rules that lawyers are prohibited from knowingly assisting their clients in breaking the law.

In response to questions from the Star, Payne, who is a partner at Nelligan O’Brien Payne in Ottawa, said Ontario’s law society had reviewed the complaint “and is not pursuing this matter.” She said she had “no other comment.”

Perrin, who is licensed to practise in Ontario and B.C., said he is “pleased that the (law societies) have closed this file and did not find any concern with my conduct as a lawyer.”

“I look forward to continuing to contribute to important public policy issues facing our country,” he said in an email.

Perrin is currently an associate professor at the University of British Columbia’s law school and a senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute for Public Policy.

According to the RCMP documents, Perrin, former legal counsel within the Prime Minister’s Office, and Payne, who was acting for Duffy, allegedly exchanged a series of emails to hammer out how Duffy would accept the money from Wright, as well as “agreed media lines.”

“After back and forth negotiations between Janice Payne and Benjamin Perrin … terms of the agreement were set,” the documents allege.

The RCMP documents state that Perrin was aware of Wright’s “personal decision to pay the money” to Duffy, “but was in no way involved in the decision.”

“The … record shows that Mr. Perrin and Ms. Payne had knowledge of both the communications and financial aspects of the Wright/Duffy deal,” Attaran wrote in his complaint to the law societies.

Duffy is expected to plead not guilty to all charges when his trial begins in April. RCMP concluded there were no grounds to charge Wright, who resigned from the Prime Minister’s Office after it was revealed that he wrote Duffy a personal cheque to cover questionable expense claims.

In July, media reports indicated that the Law Society of British Columbia closed its file on Perrin. The Star confirmed that the Law Society of Upper Canada (LSUC) has dismissed the allegations against both Perrin and Payne.

In an email to the Star, Taylore Ashlie, spokeswoman for B.C.’s law society, said the complaint against Perrin was “thoroughly investigated and all available materials were reviewed” before it was closed.

She said the law society considered the rule that states that a lawyer “must not engage in any activity that the lawyer knows or ought to know assists in or encourages any dishonesty, crime or fraud.”

Ashlie said the regulator could “reopen” its investigation if new information is received.

When the Star asked the LSUC about the status of the complaints against Perrin and Payne, spokesman Roy Thomas initially said he could not comment “on whether a complaint has been received, or if we are investigating any specific matter, unless and until a matter has resulted in formal discipline, which would be public.”

That statement is consistent with the policy the LSUC has previously outlined in response to requests for information from the Star about complaints against Toronto lawyer Javad Heydary, who fled to Iran last year amid allegations that more than $3 million in trust funds were missing.

However, shortly after the Star received Ashlie’s response, Thomas added “a clarification.” In a second email, he said the allegations against the lawyers “were fully investigated and closed,” citing the RCMP’s decision to drop its investigation of Wright as a factor. He also said the LSUC could “reopen” the files, “if we were to receive new information.”

Thomas said the decision to share more details about the complaints against Perrin and Payne does not reflect a change in policy.

“Our policy continues to be to provide the public and the media with as much information as we are able to under the law,” he said. “Each request is considered individually, including whether the allegations are already public.”

Of the 4,700 complaints the LSUC receives each year, about 3,100 are authorized for full investigation. Only 100 of those prompt a public disciplinary hearing.

Attaran said he only learned that the LSUC had closed the files on Perrin and Payne as a result of inquiries by the Star. He criticized the LSUC’s policy on providing the public with information about complaints as “incoherent.”

Especially in such a high-profile matter, he said “the public has a need to know as well as a right to know” more about how the allegations into professional misconduct were probed.

“The law society should give an outline of the investigation it conducted, and the reason it believes that further inquiry is not warranted.”

Attaran is the latest to voice concerns about the way complaints against lawyers are investigated by the professional regulator, and the secrecy surrounding these probes.

In response to the Star’s ongoing investigation into how lawyers are disciplined by the LSUC, critics at Queen’s Park have called on the province to do more to protect the public.

Premier Kathleen Wynne said in September that her government “will work with the law society.” In turn, LSUC treasurer Janet Minor said she will work with the province, and said the law society is “always looking for improvements that can benefit the public and the professions.”

Both Thomas and Ashlie defended the ability of law societies in Ontario and B.C. to protect the public interest, noting that the regulators include non-lawyers in decision-making and on disciplinary tribunals.

With files from Kenyon Wallace and Dale Brazao

Submit News to CKA News What breast cancer taught me about love
Sat, 25 Oct 2014 08:00:00 EDT

At 25, you’re usually thinking about relationships, not cancer. But I had to deal with both.

Growing up, I had no clear picture of what love meant. My ideas were based on turbulent experiences in childhood and a strict religious upbringing. I was not allowed to date. Holding hands was not permitted; kissing was forbidden. There were so many restrictions.

When I was little, I stayed at a women’s shelter with my mother and two brothers.

In my mind I picture a dimly lit house filled with peaceful solitude. If I close my eyes I can see the character on the front of the nightgown they let me keep. If I breathe in deeply I can smell the aromas drifting from the kitchen. The food was abundant. My bed was warm and inviting. It was a safe haven, an escape from the chaos of the outside world, and a landmark in the development of my thoughts about relationships.

Needless to say, when I entered the dating arena, I had a lot of reservations. It was difficult for me to trust a man. I had trouble communicating and sharing my feelings. I hated saying “I love you.” I moved from one unhealthy relationship to another.

I was 24 when I met John. He spent a lot of time convincing me that he cared for me; he told me I was beautiful and that he loved me. And one day I found myself telling him I loved him, too. I began to open up.

“Relationships aren’t so bad after all,” I thought. “I can share who I am and still be loved. This is healthy.”

Shortly after I had decided that what we shared was love, I was diagnosed with breast cancer.

The diagnosis threw me into a deep, dark ocean. I was drowning in waves of confusion, a jumble of doctor appointments and an abyss to the unknown. So there I was: flailing arms, reaching out to John. Surely John would save me. I was confident that he would let me cry on his shoulder and tell me everything was going to be OK. He would do this because he loved me.

John told me I was going to be OK. And then he broke up with me.

Nights were terribly lonely. “I can deal with cancer, but I can’t deal with a breakup,” I would sob into my pillow. Questions bounced around my mind. How could John leave me when I needed him the most? I thought we were in love.

I began chemotherapy. My appearance slowly began to change. I lost my beautiful long hair; I gained weight.

And there I stood: in front of the mirror, staring at a stranger that I alone had to love.

My reflection was foreign. Its head was bald. Its naked body revealed a scar that stretched across the left side of its concave chest, which lifted with each beat of its heart.

I would lean in close to that reflection, about three inches away, with mascara wand in hand. I would peer at the three single eyelashes that remained on my eyelid. And then I would brush those three lashes. I would brush them over and over again until they were thick with mascara. If I could look like me again, I would be easier to love.

After treatment had finished and my hair began to grow, I refused to cut it. I had a thousand split ends, and at one point grew a curly mullet. I wanted so badly to speed up the process, so I went to the wig shop to get extensions. When the lady there told me my hair was too weak, I tried on a wig, looked in the mirror and was startled by what I saw.

There in the mirror, was a glimpse of me before cancer. I tried so hard not to cry. My brother must have seen how much it meant to me because he bought me the wig.

Everything was starting to get back to how it was before cancer. My hair kept growing and I no longer wore wigs. Men started paying attention to me once again, but I was weary and suspicious of their intentions. Being told I was beautiful was a poor indication that they loved me. It was not enough.

I suppose I could have continued on that path but as chance would have it, I had a reoccurrence with cancer four years following my initial diagnosis. The news hurtled me onto a path that lead me to the door of a painter. He was working on a new painting, and asked me to be his muse. He was a wealth of information and knowledge, but still the most unassuming person I had ever met. He challenged me in new ways; we spent a lot of time in the kitchen exploring healthy food, cooking and laughing. He would read me excerpts from his dream journals. I was intrigued by this gentle creature.

We began to spend a lot of time together. One night, after a failed attempt at finding a movie to watch on Netflix, he ran upstairs and came back down with a bouquet of beautiful white flowers. I was scared, I didn’t think I was ready for another relationship. But I was curious. He began taking me on dates, magically appearing with tickets to the ballet after I told him I had never been.

Making the transition from muse to partner was not easy for me. I had with me a huge bag of emotions and fears. When we have a heated argument he reminds me to breathe, and he holds me while I cry. Sometimes he cries with me. When I tell him relationships are hard and all I want to do is run, he responds, “It’ll get better.” When my limbs are in pain, he massages me. When I go to an important doctor appointment, he cancels work and is right by my side.

Neither he nor I are perfect, but we explore the many facets of love. There is so much to learn. We patiently (him more so than I) remind each other that love is at its strongest when things are hard. Difficult times are the true test of love. Neither of us must run away. I am not happy that I had to experience cancer, but I am grateful that, through it, I have learned so much about love.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Sylvia Soo is the creator of http://www.cancerfabulous.com/ CancerFabulous.comEND and the Cancer Fabulous Diaries, a collaboration with http://rethinkbreastcancer.com/ Rethink Breast CancerEND. The diaries — a collection of Sylvia’s first-hand experiences — serve as a resource to help other young women with breast cancer. Beginning this month, the diaries are available online and in the format of a zine distributed at health care centres across Canada. For more information, go to rethinkbreastcancer.com

Submit News to CKA News Tracking down ?lone wolf? terror an elusive target
Fri, 24 Oct 2014 19:17:00 EDT

OTTAWA—Justin Bourque was not a terrorist, but he terrorized.

The 24-year-old murdered three RCMP officers and wounded two others in an attack on Canada’s east coast this summer.

Described as depressed, emotionally and financially unstable, Bourque sparked a manhunt before he was finally caught, shutting down the city of Moncton, N.B., for 30 hours. Bourque was later deemed mentally fit to stand trial and pleaded guilty.

On Monday, he will be in court again to hear the victim impact statements from the injured and relatives of the dead.

By definition, Bourque was a “lone wolf,” someone who acted without outside influence, driven by personal impulses still not understood. Bourque’s father said his son sounded paranoid during their last conversation. “It was as if another person was speaking,” Victor Bourque told the court.

There are similarities between Bourque and Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, the 32-year-old who terrorized the nation’s capital on Wednesday.

Both men were angry. Both were battling inner demons, although Zehaf-Bibeau, who was estranged from his parents, had a much longer history: problems with drugs, alcohol and petty crime, struggling with mental health issues.

But the implications of Zehaf-Bibeau killing a soldier and striking the heart of the country’s capital with Ottawa’s involvement in the war against the so-called Islamic State group in Syria, are far reaching.

In the shock, grief and burst of patriotism that follows such acts, there have been calls for new terror laws, greater police powers, tighter security and headlines that read: “Canada Under Attack.”

This fear of Canada under siege by “homegrown terrorists” was only heightened by the fact that Zehaf-Bibeau stormed Parliament after he fatally shot 24-year-old Cpl. Nathan Cirillo at the National War Memorial just two days after Martin Couture-Rouleau killed a Canadian soldier in a hit-and-run in Quebec.

Couture-Rouleau, too, was a lone wolf, and roughly fits the profile of what security services have warned in recent years will be the next wave of terrorists.

The threat has increased recently with a combustible mix: the rise of ISIS and the West’s failure to stop the slaughter of President Bashar Assad’s regime in Syria.

ISIS is adept at online propaganda, speaking to disenfranchised young people, offering a sense of belonging and direction to those who have neither. Canada’s prominent military role in fighting ISIS and strong war rhetoric from Ottawa has helped bring home what many Canadians likely regarded as a distant war.

Last month, an ISIS spokesperson issued a rambling 42-minute speech calling for attacks wherever, whenever, if adherents of the group could not travel abroad: “If you can kill a disbelieving American or European — especially the spiteful and filthy French — or an Australian, or a Canadian . . . kill him in any manner or way however it may be,” he said.

There is no evidence to show the attacks this week were inspired by these words, but both men were hoping to go to Syria, and frustrated by their difficulty in travelling.

Couture-Rouleau, who had waited in a parking lot for at least two hours Monday before he drove his car into two soldiers, killing 53-year-old Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent, had had his passport seized when he tried to fly to Syria, via Turkey earlier this year. The RCMP had already designated him a “high-risk traveller.”

Zehaf-Bibeau was delayed in getting a passport due to security questions regarding his criminal history, which, according to those who last spoke to him, was a source of great angst.

But while ISIS has undoubtedly increased the stakes, lone wolf terrorism is not new.

“The study of terrorism is a speculative endeavour at best, with cultural and personal biases potentially affecting explanations as to why individuals or groups may resort to violence against a wide range of targets,” writes Jeffrey D. Simon in his book, The Growing Threat of Lone Wolf Terrorism.

Simon says the most important aspect to the lone wolf terrorism phenomenon is the Internet, which allows people to become “infatuated with extremist ideologies.”

Before Anders Behring Breivik bombed downtown Oslo on July 20, 2011, and then systematically gunned down 62 teenagers and young adults at a summer camp for Norway’s Labour Party, the 32-year-old Norwegian posted a 1,500-page manifesto online calling for an end to “the Islamic colonization and Islamisation of Western Europe.”

Norway’s dignified and measured response in the immediate wake of such a horrific terrorist attack is often held up as the model of how a country should deal with national tragedy.

Canada’s time has come — the next few weeks and months will reveal how we cope.

Based on the facts known to date, it is unclear if new security laws or more resources may have not have stopped men like Zehaf-Bibeau and Couture-Rouleau, any more than they could have stopped Bourque.

“As my colleague in Quebec said, even if we had surveillance on Rouleau, in the parking lot, we probably would not have been in a position to have stopped his attack on those soldiers. That’s the kind of threat we’re having to deal with,” RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson told a press conference Thursday.

As for Zehaf-Bibeau, Paulson said: “We didn’t know that this individual was in Ottawa, had that intention and of course had we known that we all would have acted on that in defense.”

But in echoing comments made earlier by the head of the Canadian Security Service Intelligence Service, Paulson also stated that the security services were overwhelmed.

And in this sense, some have suggested that the examination of what went wrong should extend beyond looking to the actions of inactions of the RCMP, CSIS or Canada’s Muslims communities, which have widely denounced the acts.

“In many cases the kind of person who becomes radicalized and tries to pull off a lone wolf terror attack would, in the absence of becoming radicalized, commit some other violent crime,” says David Welch, senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation and chair of Global Security. “The problem is not Muslim radicalization so much as maladjusted males.”

Welch said many who turn to the Internet and are “self-radicalized” are detected and intercepted. But there will always be the elusive lone wolf and he said that problem must be kept in perspective.

“Such people will never bring down the state or succeed in doing more than inflicting local, limited damage,” he said. “That is not to belittle the tragedy of the death or injury of their innocent victims, but the tragedies here are personal, not national, and we need to keep that in fact in view.” 

Follow Michelle Shephard on Twitter @shephardm. Contact her at mshephard@thestar.ca .

Submit News to CKA News Mayoral candidate Doug Ford's cozy domestic side
Fri, 24 Oct 2014 08:00:00 EDT

A black SUV glides along a leafy street in Etobicoke and stops in front of Doug Ford (open Doug Ford's policard)’s home. It’s dark, but the driver’s shock of bright blond hair identifies him a block away.

I walk over as he loads boxes of food into the SUV for the next day’s Thanksgiving food drive, and I ask how his brother is doing.

He looks up and groans. “Awwww, not too good,” he says. Mayor Rob Ford (open Rob Ford's policard) is undergoing chemotherapy at Mount Sinai Hospital and has more sessions ahead of him. Doctors can’t say how many.

He expected to lose his hair, says Doug, but not that his head would hurt so much.

“He’s not finished with chemo but today he told his doctor, ‘No more!’ ” Doug says. “The doctor looked him straight in the eye and said, ‘You’ll be dead by Christmas.’ ”

That changed Rob’s mind. What choice does he have if he wants a chance at life?

“It rips my heart right out,” Doug says as we head up the walk. “I have to hold myself together when I’m with him.”


There’s never been any doubt about the strong ties, both emotional and political, between Rob and Doug Ford, whose seeming interchangeability led Doug to replace the ailing Rob as mayoral candidate on Sept. 12.

And for opponents of the Fords’ policies, they’ve been equally reviled and attacked.

Some see Doug as the brains while Rob is the more visceral politician. And there is no shortage of Doug Ford foes at City Hall who, off-the-record, decry what they describe as “thuggish” behaviour. They say he’s a “bully,” has “no shame” and “refuses to listen to advice.” Rival John Tory calls him “the hammer.”

There’s also no doubt about the bonds of loyalty within Doug’s own family. Another side of him is evident at home, a place full of warmth and activity.

The dichotomy of the man can be striking. He’s goofy about his pets and adores his daughters, “his four angels.” And yet he’s overheard after a debate referring to someone as “a little bitch” — photographers say he was referring to the Star’s Jennifer Pagliaro but Ford maintains it was about another person. In any case, one knows he would never abide such language being applied to any of his girls.

A loveable lab waits on the mat in the front hall shaking with excitement. Hard to believe Buddy is 15. “All he wants is to be petted the whole time,” says Doug in mock exasperation.

Star photographer David Cooper and I get settled in the living room, along with Ford campaign aide Amin Massoudi. Doug, who will be 50 on Nov. 20, and his wife, Karla, sit together on a high-backed couch and Buddy plants himself on Doug’s feet.

The room is furnished with pale tones, fancy yet lived-in.

It’s an animal-friendly home. Besides Buddy, there are four cats — sisters Charlie and Sassy, 11, Roxy, 8 and Jimmy 2.

I look up and see Charlie, with her long, cream-coloured fur, curled up on another couch. Cats are not allowed on the furniture. “NO!” shouts Doug from across the room.

Karla jumps in: “I’ll spray her later,” she says, pointing to a water bottle. “And I don’t fool around. I give good sprays.”

Charlie opens an eye and yawns.


The family has deep roots in Toronto and Etobicoke. Doug Ford Sr. met his wife, Diane, at Sunnyside Beach, where he was a lifeguard in the ’50s. He’d grown up poor in the east end, the youngest of 9, raised by a single mother. He was an all-round athlete, a powerful swimmer who had huge respect for Marilyn Bell because, he said, he couldn’t withstand the freezing water of Lake Ontario the way she did when she swam across.

Doug tells the family stories. His dad asked Diane if she wanted a ride home. “There was a Caddy and a Lincoln. She was all excited. And in between was a Triumph motorcycle. ‘Hop on,’ he said. We figure she was disappointed.

“They had just oiled the road to keep the dust down and he wiped out. Mom went one way, the bike went the other — and my Dad went over to check on his bike first.”

The story still gets a big laugh, just as it did for Doug Sr. He started the family business, Deco Labels and Tags Inc., raised four children, Kathy, Randy, Doug and Rob, and served in Mike Harris’s Conservative Ontario government from 1995 until 1999.

He retired from the business at 67, dividing it up for his sons, 40 per cent each for Doug and Randy and 20 per cent for Rob.

He then spent his time at home, making suggestions to his wife about how things should be done until Diane Ford called Doug to say, “Dad’s not working and he doesn’t know what to do with his time. Puh-leeze find something for him. If you don’t, I’m going to kill him.”

Doug Ford Sr. died of colon cancer in 2006.

More mayoral profiles on thestar.com

Olivia Chow shows grit in life and a tough election


Doug Jr. surprised dark-haired Karla Middlebrook with a ring while they watched a hockey game on a date. They’ve been married almost 30 years and have an easy, teasing banter, the kind that’s hard to manufacture for a reporter’s benefit.

They had met at a pool party at his parents’ home in Etobicoke. “His eyes met my eyes,” says Karla. “I was shy and quiet so I didn’t approach him. My mom and dad both loved him because he was a respectable young man. My mom said, ‘He takes care of his mother and a man like that will take care of his wife.’ ”

“I was built like Charles Atlas, I was 190 pounds of dancing dynamite,” says Doug in what feels like a well-worn family line. Four daughters later, they still have date night once a week. Maybe a meal out or a movie.

All their girls — Krista, 24, Kayla, 22, Kara, 20 and Kyla, 19 — are blond like their dad.

Karla, who has an easy, affable way about her, has been active in her husband’s mayoral campaign, canvassing door-to-door. And criticism of Doug has been tough for her.

She says it was “ridiculous” there was controversy over her husband’s claim she’s Jewish.

“I do have Jewish blood,” says Karla, explaining her mother’s parents came from Europe separately to flee persecution. “Doug isn’t anti-Semitic or homophobic or racist. I know the truth, but he’s judged by harsh criticism of people who don’t know. Bully — that’s the worst.”

She grew up in the city’s west end. Her father, Bill, who died in 1994, used to tell Doug stories about being in the army in World War II. Karla’s mother, Julie, has Alzheimer’s, and she goes to the home to help care for her every day. “She still knows me, I know she does.”

If Doug’s elected, Karla says, she want to do something for Alzheimer’s patients and, she adds, “I’d like to help animals.”

They say they’ve had to deal with “serious threats” against their family (some reported to police in June 2013), particularly ugly slurs against their daughters. For that reason, they didn’t want their girls to be photographed. Doug says threats have also come to their Florida home.

With so much criticism from his colleagues, praise comes from unexpected sources. Toronto Centre — Rosedale Councillor Krystyn Wong-Tam calls Doug “very approachable” and says that “from Day One we’ve had a cordial relationship even though we’re on opposite sides.” She’s an activist politician who came out as a lesbian in high school, while Ford is staunchly on the right. “If you get on his bad side, watch out,” says Wong-Tam. “He can be vindictive.”

Unlike his brother Rob, Doug says he’ll march in the Pride Parade as mayor and says he’s taken his daughters in past years.

This Ford is master grassroots politician. A millionaire with property in Florida and Muskoka and the company he co-inherited from his father, he’s adept at creating the impression he fights for the people against “the elites.” As is his brother.

He checks name tags and often calls people by their first names. A waiter, for example, who has just met him will say Doug’s “a guy you can count on.” His handshake is firm and eye contact, direct.

In his brief time on the campaign trail, he’s made some astute moves. Arguably, it was smarter to talk to fans at the Maple Leaf home opener than attend a debate on social issues at Regent Park. There would be more debates. And don’t people who are barely scraping by on low-wage jobs understand why he spurned the Empire Club speech with a table of 10 going for $800? Not bad optics as long as his wealth is overlooked.

“I’ve learned a lot from Rob,” says Doug. “He might have poor personal judgment but his political sense is perfect. He has the heartbeat — the pulse — of Toronto in every different area.

“You know why? Because he makes 70, maybe 80 calls a day. He knows what’s going on.”


Doug entered the race late, on Friday, Sept. 12, just before the 2 p.m. cutoff for candidate registration. He says it was a scramble after Rob was diagnosed with a mass on his abdomen. It turned out to be malignant and a rare form of cancer.

Doug says Rob told him of stomach pain at breakfast on Wednesday, Sept. 10, adding it began when he was in rehab in June.

The last-minute shuffle, with Rob entering the race for councillor in Ward 2, started rumours of a bait-and-switch. The change had been predicted in a tweet in July from Rob’s 2010 campaign manager, Nick Kouvalis, now on John Tory’s election team. “You heard it here first,” he wrote.

Doug insists it “really came down to that last day and events that unfolded at the last minute.”

Kouvalis says he believes the Fords and hopes for Rob’s recovery. In a phone interview, he says he made the prediction because he always knew “Doug really wanted to be mayor. Doug has been after power from Day 1.”

Jeff Silverstein, Ford’s communications manager, denies that his boss wanted the mayor’s job from the beginning.

In November 2012, when Rob Ford lost a conflict of interest case and an Ontario Superior Court judge ordered him removed from office, Kouvalis says Doug phoned to say he wanted to push for a byelection and asked Kouvalis to be his campaign manger. Rob opposed the move and eventually won his appeal.

Doug’s ambition isn’t a secret. In June 2012, Star urban affairs reporter David Rider wrote that Doug was eager to run provincially if then premier Dalton McGuinty called a snap election. It didn’t happen.

Doug has largely avoided his brother’s scandals. However, the Globe published an investigation in May 2013 that alleges Doug was the go-to dealer for hashish in central Etobicoke in the 1980s. “It’s all lies,” says Doug. “None of it is true.”

The Globe has stood by its investigation. Ford said he would sue but hasn’t.

“I don’t drink or do drugs,” he says. “I don’t even take aspirin. My drink is chocolate milk.”

* * *

An hour into the interview, Buddy is still jammed against Doug’s feet, his pale fur by now covering his dark blue suit. “Ah Buddy,” Doug says, trying to push the dog away. A futile gesture.

“I like cats too,” says Doug. “I just don’t like four of them sleeping on my head.”

Karla blames Doug for Buddy’s extra weight. “They bond over cookies and milk at midnight,” she says.

Their daughters are all “fitness fanatics,” says Doug.” They track every ounce of food that goes in their mouths.”

He includes his wife in that claim. Until a recent injury she got up at five every morning to work out for two hours. She’s cut it to one hour. Meanwhile, their youngest, Kyla, has won numerous fitness and cheerleading competitions.

Their second daughter, Kara, has a broadcast television diploma from Conestoga College. “Who ever thought a Ford kid would be in the media?” jokes Doug, who along with Rob has repeatedly claimed reporters have a vendetta against the Fords. “If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em.”

.

Submit News to CKA News Canada?s wild digital frontier needs policing
Wed, 09 Feb 2011 03:08:26 Z
John Ivison: The copyright bill has a number of provisions that are far less favourable to Canada’s performers and creators, who are about to see take a big hit to their pocket-books
Submit News to CKA News Election buzz, stale rhetoric ? Parliament has deja vu all over again
Tue, 01 Feb 2011 11:42:28 Z
John Ivison: If you missed Question Period Monday, don’t worry — you have a golden opportunity to miss it again Tuesday
Submit News to CKA News Death of Personal Responsibility: Think outside the lunchbox
Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:50:39 Z
Neil Seeman: So what should the role of the state be in combating obesity? It’s time to think outside of the lunchbox, and try a whole new idea: healthy living vouchers, or HLVs
Submit News to CKA News Don?t give Quebec a nickel
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:57:55 Z
Jonathan Kay: If Harper says no to the Bloc's demands, he will be going to the voters as a man of principle who stood his ground on a subject far more important to this country than corporate tax rates
Submit News to CKA News Stelmach more than a victim of changing attitudes
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:38:13 Z
Kevin Libin: Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach bet the fortune of his party’s unparalleled political dynasty on a leadership strategy that failed to pan out
Submit News to CKA News Dave Taylor a mixed blessing for fledgling Alberta Party
Tue, 25 Jan 2011 02:34:30 Z
Kevin Libin: The addition of former Liberal MLA Dave Taylor to the Alberta party gives it a legitimacy boost, but does the outspoken former radio personality fit with the party's post-partisan dreams?
Submit News to CKA News Playing by China's rules
Sun, 23 Jan 2011 19:21:17 Z
Rex Murphy: China has reached an agreement with the Newfoundland government to begin the importation of seal and seal products into its potentially vast market. This is both very good and rare news for Newfoundland sealers
Submit News to CKA News Canada: Nanny AND wimpy state?
Thu, 20 Jan 2011 20:08:14 Z
Before, there actually had to be a violent protest before public institutions caved in and cancelled controversial events. Now, a group of unhinged zealots make a couple of angry phone calls and – poof! – they silence free speech and free assembly
Submit News to CKA News Executives probably not swayed by Liberal tax plan
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 23:54:00 Z
Scott Stinson: It’s a safe bet that Mr. Ignatieff did not win many converts with his tax-increase sales pitch to Canadian executives on Tuesday. This is not a great surprise
Submit News to CKA News Conservatives missed the call for more civilized debate
Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:58:11 Z
Kelly McParland: The federal Conservatives’ brain trust must have been somewhere else when President Barack Obama delivered his speech in Arizona last week, calling for greater civility in political debate.
Submit News to CKA News Harper's five years: Canadians better off, even if they don't feel it
Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:21:36 Z
John Ivison: Jan. 23 marks the fifth anniversary of Stephen Harper’s 2006 election victory and in early February, he will pass Lester B. Pearson’s time in office to become Canada’s 11th longest-serving Prime Minister

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