Canada Newswatch

The CKA Canada Newswatch is a companion to our in-house Canada News system.
The Newswatch is a collection of various Canadian news feeds in one convenient location.


CKA members can use the Canada newswatch to promote stories from the newswatch to the CKA News Links.

Click the Submit News-link to CKA News button to quickly submit news.

Daily Canada Newswatch

Submit News to CKA News Surrey Mounties jolt man with Taser
Tue, 29 Jul 2014 00:14:22 Z
RCMP officers arrived at the store in the 10300 block of King George Blvd. around noon after receiving with reports that the man was aggressively confronting customers and staff.
Submit News to CKA News Website helps parents, coaches recognize concussion signs in kids, what to do
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:03:31 -0400
The Child & Family Research Institute at BC Children?s Hospital has launched a website that which flags the warning signs of concussion and explains what steps need to be taken to diagnose and manage the all-too-common brain injury
Submit News to CKA News McCallum, Hepner attract similar support from Surrey voters: poll
Tue, 29 Jul 2014 00:00:56 Z
Surrey mayoral candidates Doug McCallum and Linda Hepner have attracted similar support so far among voters, according to a new Insights West poll. The poll found that 40 per cent of respondents were either “very likely” or “moderately likely” to vote for former mayor McCallum while 37 per cent indicated a preference for city councillor Hepner.
Submit News to CKA News Canadian prof in Florida was killed in his car, found by neighbour: 911 call
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:57:10 -0400
The 911 call to the Tallahassee Fire Department was made by a neighbour who was the first to find Daniel Merkel, who was shot July 18.
Submit News to CKA News Burnaby Muslims celebrate end of Ramadan
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:53:13 Z
As hundreds of Muslims flocked to Burnaby’s Masjid Al-Salaam mosque Monday morning to mark the end of Ramadan, the deteriorating situation in the Gaza Strip was top of mind for many worshippers.
Submit News to CKA News B.C. can be counted as friend of Israel: Premier Christy Clark
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:50:03 Z
VANCOUVER - Premier Christy Clark says British Columbia can be counted on as a friend of Israel in a letter posted to the website of The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs.
Submit News to CKA News Convicted killer laughs in court while attempting to plead guilty in second case
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:47:38 -0400
Traigo Andretti, who is serving a life-sentence for killing and dismembering his wife, is accused of murdering a Manitoba woman eight years ago
Submit News to CKA News Website helps parents, coaches recognize concussion signs in kids, what to do
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:46:58 Z
TORONTO - Deciding whether a child may have sustained a concussion while engaged in play or sport can be difficult because tell-tale symptoms may not show up right away. But a new online resource aimed at parents and coaches could help make that determination a whole lot easier.
Submit News to CKA News B.C. hunters poaching animals in Yukon a big concern: conservation officer
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:46:48 Z
B.C. residents authorized to hunt big game in parts of the province that are adjacent to the Yukon routinely cross the territorial boundary to kill animals, says a Whitehorse conservation officer.
Submit News to CKA News Bannister, Landy and a dancing chimp
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:45:50 Z
A few years ago, Jason Beck of the B.C. Sports Hall of Fame visited Vancouver cycling legend Lorne “Ace” Atkinson, who lived above his Ace Cycles store on West Broadway. “I said ‘Whatever happened to the bike you raced (at the Empire Games) in ’54? “ recalls Beck. “And he said ‘It’s above your head.’”
Submit News to CKA News Tories downplay report Germany doesn't like Canada/EU trade deal
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:45:30 -0400

The government says "excellent progress" is being made on the multibillion-dollar trade agreement between the EU and Canada despite a weekend report in the European press indicating Germany intends to reject the deal.
Submit News to CKA News Nova Scotia lobster levy prompts confusion, government clarification
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:41:38 -0400
Fisheries groups say they were not consulted about government?s plan for the marketing levy
Submit News to CKA News Alberta breaks pledge on civil-servant pay freeze
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:31:59 -0400
The Alberta government will boost salaries for top civil servants to more than $300,000 a year by 2016
Submit News to CKA News New hunt on for lost Franklin ships
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:13:05 Z
The Royal Canadian Geographical Society has begun a new hunt for Erebus and Terror, the missing ships of Sir John Franklin's doomed Arctic expedition.
Submit News to CKA News Bank of Canada quietly fixes error about $10 bill
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:12:34 -0400
Ryerson University professor e-mailed Bank of Canada last fall saying website incorrectly identified mountain on new plastic bill
Submit News to CKA News PMO defends Harper government?s recognition of feminist icon
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:10:09 EDT

OTTAWA—A spokesman for Prime Minister Stephen Harper dismisses accusations from the opposition parties and others that the government is erasing the late feminist icon Thérèse Casgrain from Canada’s public history.

Carl Vallee called the accusations “ridiculous,” pointing to a revised citizenship study guide — Discover Canada — that for the first time included mention of Casgrain.

The guide, launched in 2009 and updated in 2011, has a section on the women’s suffrage movement that includes a sentence on Casgrain’s activism, which helped Quebec women win the right to vote in 1940.

The Canadian Press reported this week that a volunteer award named for Casgrain in 1982 was abruptly eliminated in 2010, unannounced, to be replaced by the Prime Minister’s Volunteer Awards in 2011.

Casgrain’s granddaughter, Michele Nadeau, said the cancellation was made without consulting the family or the Thérèse Casgrain Foundation, which Nadeau heads in Montreal.

New Democrat MP Niki Ashton called on the government to revive the award, saying its demise reflects Harper’s frequent attacks on women’s rights.

“He took out a feminist icon and replaced her with himself,” she said in an interview. “It’s deeply symbolic. It’s emblematic of Harper’s approach to women’s equality.”

Ashton said the brief reference to Casgrain in the citizenship guide is no substitute for the volunteer award honour.

Quebec Liberal MP Stéphane Dion also called for reinstatement of the Casgrain award, saying the substitute prime minister’s award is “insulting” to the memory of a pioneer in women’s rights.

Dion said the way the Casgrain award was ended, without an announcement, is typical of the Harper’s government’s penchant for secrecy. “You do it openly and explain why,” he said in an interview.

A spokeswoman for Employment Minister Jason Kenney, whose department is responsible for administering volunteer awards, said the program was changed to broaden eligible recipients to include businesses and not-for-profit groups, as well as individuals.

The Casgrain award recognized two individuals, while the Prime Minister’s Volunteer Awards recognize 17 individuals or organizations.

Alexandra Fortier said that two of the five new categories “maintain the spirit and the objectives of the Casgrain award.”

She also suggested there was fading interest in the Casgrain award in its final two years, with only 52 nominations in 2008 and 69 in 2009, its last year. The first year of the new Prime Minister’s Volunteer Awards in 2011 attracted 751 nominations.

The Canadian Press reported earlier this month that the number of nominations for the prime minister’s award has fallen sharply since, to 482 in the second year and 315 in the current third year.

Submit News to CKA News PMO defends elimination of award named for feminist icon
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 23:03:35 +0000

Spokesperson points to one sentence in citizenship guide to prove government not erasing Thérèse Casgrain from public history

The post PMO defends elimination of award named for feminist icon appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Internal Finance memo warns of potential for Bitcoin-related crime
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:54:45 +0000

Recent federal budget announced measures to bring Bitcoin transactions within scope of Canada's anti-money laundering law

The post Internal Finance memo warns of potential for Bitcoin-related crime appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Committee debates sanctions for senator who hired girlfriend
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:49:18 +0000

Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu testified about why he employed his girlfriend as an assistant in violation of Senate guidelines

The post Committee debates sanctions for senator who hired girlfriend appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Man acquitted of murder in neighbour's 1974 killing - Toronto Star
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:48:11 GMT

Toronto Star

Man acquitted of murder in neighbour's 1974 killing
Toronto Star
Alan Smith has been acquitted of murder in the 1974 killing of Beverly Smith. Last month, Justice Bruce Glass threw out all the evidence gathered in an elaborate, nearly year-long undercover operation by Durham Regional Police that elicited two widely ...
Alan Dale Smith acquitted in 1974 homicide of Beverly SmithCBC.ca

all 2 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Orillia senior hits $20 million jackpot - CTV News
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:48:05 GMT

Melfort Journal

Orillia senior hits $20 million jackpot
CTV News
There's a new multi-millionaire in our region; an Orillia man got a pleasant surprise when he checked his lotto max numbers from Friday's draw. John Mason says the whole idea of being Canada's newest multi-millionaire is just sinking in. ?Well it's just super,? ...
Senior Wins JackpotBayshore Broadcasting News Centre

all 72 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Stolen pendant containing boy's ashes returned: Edmonton police - CTV News
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:43:44 GMT

CTV News

Stolen pendant containing boy's ashes returned: Edmonton police
CTV News
EDMONTON - The parents of a nine-year-old boy killed in a plane crash in 2013 say they are thankful someone returned a stolen cross necklace that holds the ashes of their child. David and Crystal Pentecost just moved to Edmonton from Manitoba three ...
Stolen cremation pendant returned to grieving familyiNews880.com
Missing cremation pendant found, say Edmonton policeEdmonton Sun

all 4 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Stolen pendant containing boy's ashes returned to family in Edmonton
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:43:00 -0400
A stolen pendant containing the ashes of a nine-year-old boy who died in a plane crash has been returned to his family, Edmonton police said Monday.
Submit News to CKA News Hitchhiking robot journeys alone across Canada to answer question: Can humans be trusted?
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:33:36 +0000
HitchBOT went from Halifax to the Quebec border on day one. Now it only needs to cover 5,600 km more without being smashed, stolen or dismantled
Submit News to CKA News Montreal police hope to avert conflicts between city?s Israeli, Palestinian communities
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:33:32 Z
As tension between the city’s Palestinians and Israelis mount over the war in Gaza, Montreal police met with members of both communities to help mediate any local conflicts.
Submit News to CKA News CPR guidelines should encourage previously dismissed technique, experts say
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:32:57 Z
For untrained bystanders who have to perform CPR after seeing an adult collapse, the professional advice just got a little murkier. For years, people were taught to give chest compressions followed by mouth-to-mouth ventilations. Then, in 2010, the International Liaison […]
Submit News to CKA News Ford says family's business with printing company 'irrelevant' - The Globe and Mail
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:27:21 GMT

Toronto Star

Ford says family's business with printing company 'irrelevant'
The Globe and Mail
Mayor Rob Ford says he does not recall if his family firm does business with a large U.S printing company he and his brother opened doors for at city hall ? nor does that matter. The latest revelations, reported by The Globe Monday, involve evidence that U.S. ...
Doug Ford Threatening Legal Action Against Globe and Mail640 Toronto News
Councillor Ford threatens legal action against Globe and MailNewstalk 1010
Fords promise legal action over alleged improper business dealingsMetroNews Canada
Toronto Sun
all 15 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Alberta government breaks promise on manager salary freeze
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:27:20 +0000

Government gives top managers 7 per cent boost

The post Alberta government breaks promise on manager salary freeze appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Quebec student Camille Leblanc-Bazinet crowned ?Fittest Woman on Earth? at 2014 Reebok CrossFit Games
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:25:57 +0000
'This year our first event was 1,000 yards of swimming in the ocean with the huge waves and then kettlebell squats with burpees. They really try to test everything'
Submit News to CKA News Political debate over marijuana legalization heats up
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:25:29 Z
The political debate over marijuana legalization in Canada could soon intensify, following a New York Times editorial that calls for the U.S. federal government to repeal its 44-year ban on pot.
Submit News to CKA News Ethics committee hears from embattled senator - Ottawa Citizen
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:24:51 GMT

Ottawa Citizen

Ethics committee hears from embattled senator
Ottawa Citizen
Senator Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu arrives to an in-camera Senate hearing on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Monday July 28, 2014. Sean Kilpatrick / CP. Share Adjust Comment Print. Sen. Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu had his one chance Monday to plead leniency ...
Senate committee debates sanctions against Tory senator who hired girlfriendWinnipeg Free Press

all 4 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Ethics committee hears from embattled senator
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:21:39 Z
Sen. Pierre-Hugues Boisvenu had his one chance Monday to plead leniency from a group of his peers tasked with determining whether the Conservative senator should be punished for trying to get job perks for a woman with whom he had an on-again, off-again relationship. It was the first time that the Senate’s conflict of interest […]
Submit News to CKA News Medical app could revolutionize patient care and safety
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:19:44 Z
WITH VIDEO: As Dr. Saleem Razack makes his rounds in the intensive care unit of the Montreal Children’s Hospital, he’s often more likely to check his iPhone and iPad than the medical charts next to the beds of his patients.
Submit News to CKA News It?s time for tougher sanctions against Russia
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:12:28 +0000

Lobbing rockets across an international border is generally considered an act of war

The post It’s time for tougher sanctions against Russia appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News The dark side of the renovation boom
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:11:23 +0000

Canadians spend billions a year on renovations. But our love affair with fix-ups has put households?and the economy?at risk.

The post The dark side of the renovation boom appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Jane Heller remembered for her vision and artistry
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:10:45 Z
Jane Heller’s photos of Montreal landmarks, the likes of the Jacques Cartier Bridge and the Farine Five Roses sign, can be seen in boutiques across the city — appearing on phone cases, pillows, prints and magnets.
Submit News to CKA News James Reimer eyes Maple Leafs No. 1 job
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:08:18 EDT

James Reimer says his heart is with Toronto.

It’s for that reason — and a chance to win back the No. 1 goalie’s job — that he decided to re-sign with the Maple Leafs for $4.6 million over two years.

“My heart has always been in Toronto,” Reimer said Monday in a phone interview. “It’s been my goal to spend my whole career there. With the city and the fans, it’s the best place to play.

“There was a real opportunity. To sign a two-year deal and be there, I’m really excited about it.”

In a way, Reimer re-signing with the Leafs is a stunning turn of events after he was subjected to the brunt of the blame, rightly or wrongly, for the Leafs’ epic late-season collapse.

It was Reimer musing after the last Leafs’ game that his time as a Leaf was over.

It was Reimer who’d asked general manager Dave Nonis to explore the possibility of a trade after losing the top job to Jonathan Bernier.

“Obviously last year it didn’t go as well as anyone would have wanted it to go,” said Reimer. “It was my understanding the door (to be the No. 1 goalie) was closed and the opportunity wasn’t there anymore.

“It was one of those things that maybe it was a better fit for everyone (if I went) somewhere else. But as the summer went on and as things started to change and more things were looked over, it started to look like there really was an opportunity in Toronto, that there was a definite chance.”

What changed?

Perhaps the realization on both sides that the market for goalies is limited — there are still a number of unrestricted free-agent netminders available — and the return for Reimer would be small.

Perhaps it was the realization by Reimer that the opportunity to be a starter would be no better anywhere else.

Perhaps it was the realization by the Leafs that they don’t have much depth and another injury to Bernier without an adequate backup could paralyze the team.

So the conversation changed. The Leafs told Reimer they needed him. The Leafs told Reimer he could unseat Bernier for the top job if he plays well enough.

“That’s pretty much what I’ve been told,” said Reimer. “That’s all a guy can ask for. All you want is a chance, and I intend to make the most of it.

“My goal is to go in there and be the No. 1 guy. Worst-case scenario: Me and Bernier push each other and we get great goaltending.”

Reimer has a loyal fan base among Leaf Nation, especially those who recall his early days — remember the Optimus Reim signs — as the best player on a bad team.

The low-water mark of his season came on March 18 when the Leafs lost 3-2 to the Detroit Red Wings, a team filled with AHL call-ups. It was Reimer’s second start in place of an injured Bernier, and the second loss in a streak that would climb to eight — killing the team’s playoff chances.

After that game, coach Randy Carlyle said Reimer had been “just okay” in net. Carlyle was clearly upset, and he was already no fan of Reimer’s floppy style compared to Bernier’s controlled approach. Reimer’s sense that his time as a Leaf was coming to an end was understandable.

But that was then.

“A lot of what’s said is in the moment,” said Reimer. “It’s emotion . . . It’s forgotten after that. I use the analogy that you’re best friends with someone. One night you’re going to get ticked off at him; the next day you’re best buddies. It’s something that happens. That’s all it is.

“I think it was blown out of proportion. I’m looking forward to the season. Me and Randy will be fine. I don’t think there will be any reason for there to be any trouble whatsoever.”

Submit News to CKA News Reject bid to build casino outside downtown core: Kamloops city staff
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:07:26 Z
City staff are encouraging councillors in Kamloops to reject a company's bid to build an expanded casino outside the downtown core.
Submit News to CKA News Peel police reach 'peaceful resolution' after officer suffers crisis in Hamilton - Toronto Star
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 22:03:42 GMT

Toronto Star

Peel police reach 'peaceful resolution' after officer suffers crisis in Hamilton
Toronto Star
Peel Regional Police have reached a ?peaceful resolution? with one of their own officers after he suffered a crisis in the Hamilton area Monday afternoon. Police were tight-lipped about the entire ordeal, but said they were investigating a ?situation? that began ...
Peaceful end in standoff involving off-duty Peel Region police officerCTV News
Peel Police in Hamilton for officer in 'crisis'Hamilton Spectator
Peel region police officer 'in crisis' stopped in HamiltonCBC.ca
Newstalk 1010
all 11 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Judge rules against Clippers owner Donald Sterling, OKs sale of team
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:58:00 -0400
A judge has ruled against Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling and cleared the way for the $2 billion sale of the team to ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer.
Submit News to CKA News EU trade deal troubles denied by Canadian, German officials - CBC.ca
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:55:15 GMT

Toronto Star

EU trade deal troubles denied by Canadian, German officials
CBC.ca
Canadian officials are quietly preparing a ceremony to formally mark the successful conclusion of EU trade deal negotiations, but Germany says it's too early to know what the final text will look like. Officials acknowledge the negotiations aren't quite completed ...
Germany plays down report that Canada-EU free trade deal in jeopardyFinancial Post
Failure not an option; Harper may need to compromise to get European trade dealTimes Colonist
Tories downplay report Germany doesn't like Canada-EU trade dealSun News Network
CanadianManufacturing.com -iPolitics.ca (subscription)
all 83 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Tuesday, July 23: Ban cyclists from seawall - Vancouver Sun
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:51:12 GMT

Vancouver Sun

Tuesday, July 23: Ban cyclists from seawall
Vancouver Sun
Re: Police investigating serious collision between tourist and cyclist on Stanley Park seawall, July 26. I am responding to the story about the American tourist who was knocked off the seawall last week and seriously injured by a bike rider. I live at English Bay, ...
'Cove' director and 'Blackfish' stars wade into Vancouver Aquarium debateGlobalnews.ca
Vancouver Aquarium whales program debate continues at Park BoardCBC.ca
Dozens to speak at part 2 of Vancouver Park Board meeting on whales, dolphins ...News1130

all 11 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News The closer you look, the weaker Canada?s job market appears
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:40:12 +0000

A refined look at the data shows that some demographics in the labour force are enduring near-historic unemployment rates

The post The closer you look, the weaker Canada?s job market appears appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Hamas and Israel trade blame for deaths of 9 children, 1 adult in Gaza park
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:37:00 -0400
Hamas and Israel blamed each other for an explosion at a Gaza park Monday that killed at least 10 Palestinians -- including nine children playing on a swing -- in a horrific scene that underscored the heavy price civilians are paying in the conflict.
Submit News to CKA News Royal happenings at the Commonwealth Games
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:34:40 +0000

The royals love watching sports as much as William loves wearing dad jeans

The post Royal happenings at the Commonwealth Games appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Stories we?re watching: What is coming will be worse, warns Israel
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:11:58 +0000

Top stories making headlines this afternoon

The post Stories we’re watching: What is coming will be worse, warns Israel appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Port Mann Bridge slush bombs an "act of God," says firm in charge of bridge operation
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 21:08:38 Z
It was an act of God that caused slush bombs to rain down on a motorist crossing the new Port Mann Bridge in the winter of 2012, according to a lawsuit response filed by the firm in charge of the bridge.
Submit News to CKA News Alberta's 'most conservative' fertility clinic restricting donations to patients of same ethnicity
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:50:18 -0400
The private clinic got wide attention last week after a Caucasian female patient complained that she had been told she could only get sperm from white donors
Submit News to CKA News Peel police reach ?peaceful resolution? after officer suffers crisis in Hamilton
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:44:34 EDT

Peel Regional Police have reached a “peaceful resolution” with one of their own officers after he suffered a crisis in the Hamilton area Monday afternoon.

Police were tight-lipped about the entire ordeal, but said they were investigating a “situation” that began around 2:30 p.m. The situation was safely resolved around 6:45 p.m. No one was hurt.

Const. Fiona Thivierge with Peel police said the situation started in the Mississauga area and officers from various police forces became involved as he travelled to the Hamilton area.

“The officer was in crisis and we are glad to report that at this point it was resolved without incident, and the officer is getting the assistance that he requires,” said Const. Thivierge, noting the assistance he is receiving is medical in nature.

Police did not confirm whether the officer was armed or if he was suffering from a mental health crisis, but advised the media and members of the public to stay away from the area.

William “Bill” R. Hume, owner of Gord's Service Centre where the standoff occurred, was just going about his regular Monday afternoon business when police from five different jurisdictions pulled into his parking lot.

“I was at the gas pump filling up a customer's car,” he recalled. Hume was “shocked” to see the incident unfold. “It's like watching the S.W.A.T. TV show only this is the real thing.”

Police showed up and told Hume and a handful of other employees — many his family members — to get into the building where they would be safe, he recalled. Police told Hume they had a “situation” behind his building.

“I got everybody in the building and we looked out and the police had all the driveways closed off. They had the building pretty well surrounded,” he said. “They did it very well because there were no sirens, no noise, it was done very quietly.”

The standoff occurred around 3:30 p.m. behind Hume's gas station near the diesel pumps, he said. He was told that police were handling the incident as an “armed situation,” though police did not confirm whether the officer was armed.

Hume was not told anything about who the officer was.

Hume's wife, clutching her small dog Clancy, said the incident lasted about two hours. “I was fine,” she said. “We were told we were safe and we didn't see anything.”

Bill Hume suspects the officer pulled into his business expecting the road to lead to Highway 8 to Cambridge. But Hume calls it “the road to nowhere,” part of newly paved roads by the Ministry of Transportation around Peters Corners that have confused some drivers.

Jake O’Donnell, a resident of Flamborough, said he was driving on Highway 5 when he saw seven police cruisers heading towards Peters Corners with their lights flashing. He also said he saw a few OPP police cars.

“After I went into a store in Waterdown and was coming back towards Peters Corners I saw a few more police officers heading towards that area,” said O’Donnell.

OPP closed the area around Peters Corners for several hours until the situation was resolved.

With files from Tim Alamenciak and the Hamilton Spectator

Submit News to CKA News First Nation says report shows government played down scope of mercury ... - The Globe and Mail
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 20:35:24 GMT

Toronto Star

First Nation says report shows government played down scope of mercury ...
The Globe and Mail
For years, the federal and provincial governments have known members of a northern Ontario First Nation suffered from mercury poisoning but failed to provide adequate compensation or health care, band members said Monday. The Grassy Narrow First ...
Rally for Grassy Narrows at Queen's Park this weekKenora Online
Mercury survivors neglected by government, Grassy Narrows First Nation claimsCBC.ca
Report on mercury poisoning never shared, Grassy Narrows leaders sayToronto Star
CP24 Toronto's Breaking News
all 19 news articles »

Canadian Editorial/Opinion Newswatch

Warning: MagpieRSS: Failed to parse RSS file. (Undeclared entity error at line 56, column 54) in D:\Hosted Sites\canadaka.net\www\includes\rss_fetch\rss_fetch.inc on line 238 Submit News to CKA News PMO defends Harper government?s recognition of feminist icon
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:10:09 EDT

OTTAWA—A spokesman for Prime Minister Stephen Harper dismisses accusations from the opposition parties and others that the government is erasing the late feminist icon Thérèse Casgrain from Canada’s public history.

Carl Vallee called the accusations “ridiculous,” pointing to a revised citizenship study guide — Discover Canada — that for the first time included mention of Casgrain.

The guide, launched in 2009 and updated in 2011, has a section on the women’s suffrage movement that includes a sentence on Casgrain’s activism, which helped Quebec women win the right to vote in 1940.

The Canadian Press reported this week that a volunteer award named for Casgrain in 1982 was abruptly eliminated in 2010, unannounced, to be replaced by the Prime Minister’s Volunteer Awards in 2011.

Casgrain’s granddaughter, Michele Nadeau, said the cancellation was made without consulting the family or the Thérèse Casgrain Foundation, which Nadeau heads in Montreal.

New Democrat MP Niki Ashton called on the government to revive the award, saying its demise reflects Harper’s frequent attacks on women’s rights.

“He took out a feminist icon and replaced her with himself,” she said in an interview. “It’s deeply symbolic. It’s emblematic of Harper’s approach to women’s equality.”

Ashton said the brief reference to Casgrain in the citizenship guide is no substitute for the volunteer award honour.

Quebec Liberal MP Stéphane Dion also called for reinstatement of the Casgrain award, saying the substitute prime minister’s award is “insulting” to the memory of a pioneer in women’s rights.

Dion said the way the Casgrain award was ended, without an announcement, is typical of the Harper’s government’s penchant for secrecy. “You do it openly and explain why,” he said in an interview.

A spokeswoman for Employment Minister Jason Kenney, whose department is responsible for administering volunteer awards, said the program was changed to broaden eligible recipients to include businesses and not-for-profit groups, as well as individuals.

The Casgrain award recognized two individuals, while the Prime Minister’s Volunteer Awards recognize 17 individuals or organizations.

Alexandra Fortier said that two of the five new categories “maintain the spirit and the objectives of the Casgrain award.”

She also suggested there was fading interest in the Casgrain award in its final two years, with only 52 nominations in 2008 and 69 in 2009, its last year. The first year of the new Prime Minister’s Volunteer Awards in 2011 attracted 751 nominations.

The Canadian Press reported earlier this month that the number of nominations for the prime minister’s award has fallen sharply since, to 482 in the second year and 315 in the current third year.

Submit News to CKA News James Reimer eyes Maple Leafs No. 1 job
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:08:18 EDT

James Reimer says his heart is with Toronto.

It’s for that reason — and a chance to win back the No. 1 goalie’s job — that he decided to re-sign with the Maple Leafs for $4.6 million over two years.

“My heart has always been in Toronto,” Reimer said Monday in a phone interview. “It’s been my goal to spend my whole career there. With the city and the fans, it’s the best place to play.

“There was a real opportunity. To sign a two-year deal and be there, I’m really excited about it.”

In a way, Reimer re-signing with the Leafs is a stunning turn of events after he was subjected to the brunt of the blame, rightly or wrongly, for the Leafs’ epic late-season collapse.

It was Reimer musing after the last Leafs’ game that his time as a Leaf was over.

It was Reimer who’d asked general manager Dave Nonis to explore the possibility of a trade after losing the top job to Jonathan Bernier.

“Obviously last year it didn’t go as well as anyone would have wanted it to go,” said Reimer. “It was my understanding the door (to be the No. 1 goalie) was closed and the opportunity wasn’t there anymore.

“It was one of those things that maybe it was a better fit for everyone (if I went) somewhere else. But as the summer went on and as things started to change and more things were looked over, it started to look like there really was an opportunity in Toronto, that there was a definite chance.”

What changed?

Perhaps the realization on both sides that the market for goalies is limited — there are still a number of unrestricted free-agent netminders available — and the return for Reimer would be small.

Perhaps it was the realization by Reimer that the opportunity to be a starter would be no better anywhere else.

Perhaps it was the realization by the Leafs that they don’t have much depth and another injury to Bernier without an adequate backup could paralyze the team.

So the conversation changed. The Leafs told Reimer they needed him. The Leafs told Reimer he could unseat Bernier for the top job if he plays well enough.

“That’s pretty much what I’ve been told,” said Reimer. “That’s all a guy can ask for. All you want is a chance, and I intend to make the most of it.

“My goal is to go in there and be the No. 1 guy. Worst-case scenario: Me and Bernier push each other and we get great goaltending.”

Reimer has a loyal fan base among Leaf Nation, especially those who recall his early days — remember the Optimus Reim signs — as the best player on a bad team.

The low-water mark of his season came on March 18 when the Leafs lost 3-2 to the Detroit Red Wings, a team filled with AHL call-ups. It was Reimer’s second start in place of an injured Bernier, and the second loss in a streak that would climb to eight — killing the team’s playoff chances.

After that game, coach Randy Carlyle said Reimer had been “just okay” in net. Carlyle was clearly upset, and he was already no fan of Reimer’s floppy style compared to Bernier’s controlled approach. Reimer’s sense that his time as a Leaf was coming to an end was understandable.

But that was then.

“A lot of what’s said is in the moment,” said Reimer. “It’s emotion . . . It’s forgotten after that. I use the analogy that you’re best friends with someone. One night you’re going to get ticked off at him; the next day you’re best buddies. It’s something that happens. That’s all it is.

“I think it was blown out of proportion. I’m looking forward to the season. Me and Randy will be fine. I don’t think there will be any reason for there to be any trouble whatsoever.”

Submit News to CKA News Peel police reach ?peaceful resolution? after officer suffers crisis in Hamilton
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:44:34 EDT

Peel Regional Police have reached a “peaceful resolution” with one of their own officers after he suffered a crisis in the Hamilton area Monday afternoon.

Police were tight-lipped about the entire ordeal, but said they were investigating a “situation” that began around 2:30 p.m. The situation was safely resolved around 6:45 p.m. No one was hurt.

Const. Fiona Thivierge with Peel police said the situation started in the Mississauga area and officers from various police forces became involved as he travelled to the Hamilton area.

“The officer was in crisis and we are glad to report that at this point it was resolved without incident, and the officer is getting the assistance that he requires,” said Const. Thivierge, noting the assistance he is receiving is medical in nature.

Police did not confirm whether the officer was armed or if he was suffering from a mental health crisis, but advised the media and members of the public to stay away from the area.

William “Bill” R. Hume, owner of Gord's Service Centre where the standoff occurred, was just going about his regular Monday afternoon business when police from five different jurisdictions pulled into his parking lot.

“I was at the gas pump filling up a customer's car,” he recalled. Hume was “shocked” to see the incident unfold. “It's like watching the S.W.A.T. TV show only this is the real thing.”

Police showed up and told Hume and a handful of other employees — many his family members — to get into the building where they would be safe, he recalled. Police told Hume they had a “situation” behind his building.

“I got everybody in the building and we looked out and the police had all the driveways closed off. They had the building pretty well surrounded,” he said. “They did it very well because there were no sirens, no noise, it was done very quietly.”

The standoff occurred around 3:30 p.m. behind Hume's gas station near the diesel pumps, he said. He was told that police were handling the incident as an “armed situation,” though police did not confirm whether the officer was armed.

Hume was not told anything about who the officer was.

Hume's wife, clutching her small dog Clancy, said the incident lasted about two hours. “I was fine,” she said. “We were told we were safe and we didn't see anything.”

Bill Hume suspects the officer pulled into his business expecting the road to lead to Highway 8 to Cambridge. But Hume calls it “the road to nowhere,” part of newly paved roads by the Ministry of Transportation around Peters Corners that have confused some drivers.

Jake O’Donnell, a resident of Flamborough, said he was driving on Highway 5 when he saw seven police cruisers heading towards Peters Corners with their lights flashing. He also said he saw a few OPP police cars.

“After I went into a store in Waterdown and was coming back towards Peters Corners I saw a few more police officers heading towards that area,” said O’Donnell.

OPP closed the area around Peters Corners for several hours until the situation was resolved.

With files from Tim Alamenciak and the Hamilton Spectator

Submit News to CKA News Fords promise legal action over alleged improper business dealings
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:22:16 EDT

Councillor Doug Ford and Mayor Rob Ford are decrying what they call a “witch hunt” and promising legal action over renewed allegations they tried to influence city hall on behalf of one of their business clients.

A rival candidate and the deputy mayor are asking the city’s integrity commissioner to release findings in an investigation into the Fords’ business dealings ahead of the October election.

Meanwhile, the co-founder of the watchdog group who filed the original complaint says the case warrants a police investigation.

The Ford brothers have been accused of trying to help U.S. printing company RR Donnelly win a city contract while their business, Deco Labels and Tags, was sub-contracted to print luggage tags for RR Donnelly through a partner, Moore Canada, according to a new report from the Globe and Mail. Meetings between city officials and the company over a printing contract were arranged by the Fords in 2011, the paper reported.

City officials say the Fords did not disclose their relationship with the company.

“This company, we have done absolutely nothing wrong,” Doug Ford told the Star Monday. “We don’t do that s---.”

He said Deco has only done two orders for RR Donnelley in the past 15 years and that he hasn’t talked to the company in four years.

Ford accused the Globe of having “stolen information” about his company for their most recent story — which references an internal spreadsheet seen by reporters. The spreadsheet, according to the Globe report, lists Moore Canada as a client and Doug Ford as the point salesperson.

“This is a vicious attack,” Ford said of the Globe. “If there’s false accusations against our company, they will be held accountable.”

Speaking to reporters in Scarborough on Monday, Rob Ford said he is “not quite sure” if RR Donnelley was even a client.

“You have to be careful what you guys say. There could be legal proceedings going on as we speak,” Ford said.

He then claimed Deco does business with “every single company, almost,” in Ontario and around the world.

“Our business is our business. I don’t ask you how much money you’ve got in the bank,” he said. “If I have to declare a conflict with every single company or every single person, then I shouldn’t be in politics for 14 years or neither should my dad or anyone else in our family. And that’s the bottom line.”

In a statement provided to the Star Monday, Ford claimed he is “fully committed to transparency and the rules” set out in the code of conduct.

He said RR Donnelley approached them claiming they could save the city “millions of dollars” in printing costs and they set up a meeting to “explore their claim.”

“At no time did I, or anyone in my office attempt to influence the decisions of City staff during or after the meeting with RR Donnelley,” the statement reads.

The Globe and Mail defended its report Monday.

“The Globe did not steal information as alleged by Councillor Ford,” editor-in-chief David Walmsley said in an email. “We received reliable information, that was clearly in the public interest, from a credible confidential source.”

The Fords have previously threatened legal action, which they have never followed up on, including against council when the mayor’s powers were stripped in November. Doug Ford also once said he would sue owners of parody accounts on Twitter if he could find them.

In June, Doug Ford accused Councillor Karen Stintz, who is also running for mayor, of stealing email lists from the mayor’s office.

Doug Ford has often described reports and investigations as witch hunts, including Chief Bill Blair conducting a police investigation into the mayor and his dealings with alleged criminals.

An employee who answered the phone at RR Donnelley Canada said the company has “no comment.” A message left at the office where Moore Canada appears to be partnered with RR Donnelley was not returned.

Democracy Watch co-founder Duff Conacher, who filed the complaint with the integrity commissioner Janet Leiper, said there should also be a criminal investigation in this case.

The Supreme Court of Canada set out in a 2006 case, R. v. Boulanger, that to establish breach of trust, five elements must be met. One of those elements is that the person accused intended to act with a “corrupt” purpose, Conacher outlined.

“The issue that this raises . . . is whether this crosses the line of breach of trust in the Criminal Code,” Conacher said. “There’s enough there that there should be an investigation to determine whether there was any communications about — ‘You’ve given us lots of business and we’re now going to try to get some city business for you.’”

To find the Fords breached the city’s own code of conduct, Conacher said the integrity commissioner needs only to show that RR Donnelley was in fact a client and that the Fords were trying to advance their private interests by helping them.

Last week, John Tory’s campaign sent a letter to Leiper, asking if the matter would be dealt with ahead of the election.

“People need to know before the election whether this kind of gravy train is running through city hall,” Tory told the Star Monday.

Deputy Mayor Norm Kelly told reporters outside his city hall office that it’s not an “unreasonable” request for the investigation to be concluded before Oct. 27.

“It’s a serious enough allegation that I think it should be addressed one way or the other,” Kelly said.

Leiper, who works full-time as a lawyer, only works part-time for the city. It’s not clear what would happen if her findings are not ready before the term’s last council meeting on Aug. 25. Leiper is mandated to report all findings to council, who decide on any sanctions if warranted.

Submit News to CKA News ?Hug a Terrorist? video in Toronto gets both praise and criticism
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:45:44 EDT

Two Canadian schoolgirls described as Palestinian-Syrians received an apparently warm embrace from strangers in downtown Toronto recently when they held out a simple sign that said, “HUG A TERRORIST.”

The simple 2:27 video was produced by social media activist group Like For Syria and created by 18-year-old York University student Omar Albach, in an attempt to call attention to civilian victims in Gaza.

It has drawn almost 240,000 views since Saturday, as well as dramatically opposing views on social media.

At the start of the clip, Albach gestures to the two young girls and says: “For the past two weeks, Israel has been killing ‘terrorists’ just like the ones standing next to me.”

According to Palestinian health officials, most of the 1,030 Palestinian victims are civilian. There have been 43 Israeli soldiers killed, as well as two Israeli civilians and a Thai worker, according to the Associated Press.

The film has alternately been called disgusting propaganda and a wonderful job of raising awareness about civilian deaths.

For his part, Albach said in an interview that the girls strongly supported the making of the video and were supported by their families.

He said they were also concerned they might meet a negative reaction.

“They were really happy to realize that people were actually really friendly and understanding,” Albach said.

None of the passersby seemed even a little surprised when the girls explain that the sign is meant to be ironic.

“We’re not actually terrorists,” one of them says.

“I’m sure you’re not a terrorist,” a passerby says.

“Thank you,” one of the girls replies.

There is also criticism that the video would have been far stronger if it left out criticism of Israel at the start, and simply focused on innocent victims.

One woman hugged the girls and then said: “I say on both sides: We are all people that should be loved. No fighting, and I love you. I love you guys.”

Submit News to CKA News TTC dismisses red-light-running bus driver
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:07:38 EDT

The TTC workers’ union won’t contest the firing of a rookie bus driver who ran a red light and swerved to avoid hitting a pedestrian. But Bob Kinnear is asking transit officials for a compassionate re-assignment of the operator, perhaps as a subway collector.

“When we compare this penalty to that of the police officer who shot Sammy Yatim nine times on a streetcar — he was suspended with pay — it seems disproportionate,” says a news release by the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 113.

“I think it’s excessive to take away someone’s employment, someone’s livelihood,” Kinnear told the Toronto Star.

The driver is a single mother of two, who established herself as a good employee in the five months she worked at the TTC, he said. New TTC operators have to pass a10-month probation.

Kinnear described the operator as “very personable, very customer oriented.”

“She was very proud to work for the TTC. She was very forthcoming. She didn’t try to sugarcoat it. I think that counts for something,” he said.

The TTC confirmed Monday it had fired the driver after an investigation into an incident caught on video by a dashboard camera. It shows the bus running a red light and swerving to narrowly avoid a pedestrian stepping into the road in Scarborough.

Kinnear said the driver, who ran the red, looked at the signal before the first bus and then she looked at the bus bay where a person waved her off. She didn’t realize the light had changed to red in those seconds.

Most drivers, at some point, will accidentally run a red or go through a stop sign and most don’t spend as much time behind the wheel as a TTC operator, said Kinnear.

TTC spokesperson Brad Ross would not respond to Kinnear’s remarks.

Earlier Monday though, he said TTC drivers are supposed to “lead by example.”

“Our operators know, like every motorist and everybody who drives, that the Highway Traffic Act applies to everybody, so running a red light is not acceptable,” said Ross.

GO Transit also confirmed Monday, it has dismissed Raymond McCurdy, 39, who was charged in connection with the beating death of a Toronto man at a bus shelter at Victoria Park Ave. and Clydesdale Dr.

McCurdy had not passed GO’s nine-month probation for new drivers.

The dismissal was effective July 21, a few days after a court released McCurdy on $100,000 bail and conditions. He is scheduled to appear again in court in late August on manslaughter charges.

Submit News to CKA News Live: Mayoral debate hosted by residents of Parkview Hills
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:58:38 EDT

The Parkview Hills Community Association is hosting a mayoral debate Monday from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. City hall reporter Betsy Powell and photographer Carlos Osorio will be reporting live.

Mobile users click here.

Submit News to CKA News Toronto man faces nine charges in child pornography investigation
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 11:52:23 EDT

A 57-year-old Toronto man faces nine charges in connection with a child pornography investigation and police fear there may be more victims they don’t yet know about.

Det. Const. Scott McQuoid told reporters Monday morning that a man was using social media to lure teenage girls in addition to distributing pornography.

“This man was making, accessing, possessing [and] making available pornography over the internet,” said McQuoid.

It’s alleged that a man was posing as teenager himself and had several aliases and email addresses which are listed below:

Abigail Davies; abbydavies429@gmail.com

Danica Pines: danicapines@gmail.com

Maria Moon: zippym97@gmail.com

Natasha Z: natashamoo97@gmail.com

Jim Victorry: jvictorry@gmail.com

Ashton Gomes: ashtongomes98@gmail.com

McQuoid said one of the aliases was used to communicate with and lure a girl under the age of 16.

“There was a complaint made which we followed up on,” stated McQuoid. He could not say who made it, but confirmed the investigation had been going on for about six months.

The investigation is ongoing.

Police believe there may be other victims living in Canada and other parts of the world. Anyone with information is urged to contact police at 416-808-8500.

A search warrant was executed at a home in the Lake Shore Blvd. W. area last Wednesday. James “Jim” Vanderberg was arrested and appeared in court the same day.

Vanderberg has been charged with five counts of making child pornography, possession of child pornography, accessing child pornography, making available child pornography and luring a child under the age of 16.

Submit News to CKA News Israeli PM warns of ?prolonged? campaign in Gaza war as violence rages despite Muslim holiday
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 09:06:35 EDT

GAZA, PALESTINE —Israel’s prime minister warned Monday that the country faced a prolonged campaign against Hamas in the Gaza Strip, as the military urged residents in parts of the embattled territory to evacuate ahead of what appeared to be a broadening of the three-week war.

“What is coming will be worse,” the Israeli military said in phone messages targeting Gaza militants.

Israeli leaders have been mulling whether to expand the assault against Hamas in Gaza, or respond to international calls for a truce.

The international community so far has been unable to bring about a cease-fire that would end the fighting, which has already killed at least 1,050 Palestinians, 52 Israeli soldiers and three civilians on the Israeli side.

But with attacks mounting from both sides Monday, and Israel and Hamas far apart on terms for a truce, a cease-fire appeared elusive.

“We need to be ready for a prolonged campaign,” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said, standing beside his defence minister and chief of staff. “We will continue to act aggressively and responsibly until the mission is completed to protect our citizens, soldiers and children.”

Hamas spokesman Sami Abu Zuhri struck a defiant tone in response to Netanyahu’s warnings.

“His threats do not scare Hamas or the Palestinian people and the occupation will pay the price for the massacres against civilians and children,” he said.

Israel said it sent text messages and phoned residents of northern Gaza — including Shijaiyah, the site of one of the war’s bloodiest battles last week — urging them to flee their homes and move toward Gaza City.

The United Nations on Monday called for an “immediate” cease-fire in the fighting and on Sunday, President Barack Obama called Netanyahu to push for an immediate end to the conflict.

But Israel and Hamas’ terms for ending the fighting remain far apart. Hamas has conditioned a halt to the fighting on an easing of a crippling blockade on the territory imposed by Egypt and Israel.

Israel meanwhile wants to see the Gaza Strip demilitarized and Hamas stripped of its rocket firing abilities.

Israel says it launched its war on July 8 to halt incessant rocket fire from Gaza. It later broadened the assault into a ground offensive meant to tackle Hamas’ network of tunnels which Israel sees as a major threat.

Despite Israel’s attempts to destroy the tunnels, the Israeli military said Monday that militants succeeded to enter Israel through a tunnel leading from Gaza, a sign that the threat of attacks from tunnels has not been eradicated. The military said troops killed one militant.

Also Monday, the Israeli military said that a mortar attack on southern Israel killing four soldiers. Another five soldiers were killed Monday, but the details behind their deaths were not immediately released.

Earlier, a strike on a Gaza park killed 10 people Monday, nine of them children, as Israeli and Palestinian authorities traded blame over the attack.

The Gaza park attack happened as children played on a swing in the Shati refugee camp on the edge of Gaza City, said Ayman Sahabani, head of the emergency room at nearby Shifa Hospital. Sahabani said nine of the 10 killed at the park were children under the age of 12 and 46 were wounded.

The strike occurred a few minutes after an outpatient clinic at Gaza’s main hospital, Shifa, was hit, leaving several people wounded. Camera crews were prevented from filming the area of impact at Shifa.

Gaza’s police operations room, Civil Defence and Sahabani blamed the attacks on Israeli airstrikes.

Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, an Israeli army spokesman, denied Israel was involved. “This incident was carried out by Gaza terrorists whose rockets fell short and hit the Shifa Hospital and the Beach (Shati) camp,” he said, adding that the military had identified 200 “failed launchings.”

Gaza’s Interior Ministry spokesman Eyad al-Bozum said he believes that shrapnel found in dead bodies and in the wounded is evidence of Israel’s role in the incident.

“The occupation claims that Palestinian rockets hit the hospital and the park,” he said. “This is an attempt to cover their ugly crime against children and civilians, and because of their fear of scandal and international legal prosecution.”

In some parts of Gaza, residents said they received messages to evacuate, but due to heavy tank shelling nearby, did not feel safe enough to flee. Israel said it warned residents in several areas of northern Gaza — including Shijaiyah, which saw one of the bloodiest battles last week — to leave.

Jabaliya resident Sufian Abed Rabo said his family of 17 has taken refuge underneath the stairway in the building of their home, which they rebuilt after it sustained damage during the 2009 war in Gaza.

“God help us. We have nothing to do but pray,” Rabo said. “Maybe in the morning (we will evacuate), if we are still alive.”

More than 170,000 people have already fled the fighting, with many seeking shelter in U.N. facilities. In previous battles, entire neighbourhoods in Gaza have been flattened and turned to rubble.

Israel also resumed tank shelling along the eastern and southern parts of the Gaza Strip on Monday night, according to the Palestinian Red Crescent. At least six people were killed in tank shelling across the territory.

Children were playing on a swing when the strike hit the park in the Shati refugee camp on the edge of Gaza City, said Ayman Sahabani, head of the emergency room at nearby Shifa Hospital.

He gave the death toll and said 46 people also were wounded.

The strike on the park occurred a few minutes after the hospital’s outpatient clinic was hit, leaving several people wounded. Camera crews were prevented from filming the area of impact at Shifa.

Gaza’s police operations room, Civil Defence and Sahabani said the deaths and injuries were caused by Israeli airstrikes.

Lt. Col. Peter Lerner, an Israeli army spokesman, denied Israel was involved. “This incident was carried out by Gaza terrorists whose rockets fell short and hit the Shifa Hospital and the Beach (Shati) camp,” he said.

The strikes occurred on a day of heavy fighting after a temporary humanitarian cease-fire as international efforts intensified to end the three-week war between Israel and Hamas militants.

Israeli jets struck several sites in Gaza and rockets continued to fall on Israel, the Israeli military said, disrupting a relative lull in the Gaza war at the start of a major Muslim holiday.

MORE ON THESTAR.COM: Gaza, Israel supporters rally at Queen’s Park.

Three responses to Gaza: despair, cynicism, (maybe) hope: Salutin

Trudeau falls in line with Harper’s stance on Gaza: Siddiqui

Beautiful dream of Israel has become a nightmare: Maté

Submit News to CKA News Dying woman?s battle to renovate house stalled by neighbour squabble
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 06:00:00 EDT

Anna Craig pores over the renovation designs for her bungalow. They look like any set of home blueprints — floor plans for an open-concept kitchen, a second storey, and a slanted modern rooftop — but these aren’t just everyday designs.

They are her legacy.

Craig, a 37-year-old architect, has terminal cancer and wants to renovate her two-bedroom bungalow home, a creative redesign to leave for her husband and young children when she’s gone — a small monument of love.

But now, the plans may be stalled, as neighbours on Craig’s quiet street, steps from Colonel Sam Smith Park, fear the modern design may depreciate their home and put their windows in shadow.

“I’m angry. I feel betrayed,” Craig says. For months, she says she consulted with neighbours about the plans, and feels she had their support.

The main complainant is Craig’s 89-year-old next-door neighbour Joan Janes, whose son-in-law wrote a letter on her behalf to the Etobicoke Committee of Adjustment. At a committee meeting last week, Craig and husband Ian Ricci had hoped to seek approval for a redesign that addressed earlier city requests. Instead, the application was deferred to address the new concerns. With committee meetings just once a month for their area, the delay worries Craig, who begins chemotherapy treatments again in the fall for metastatic breast cancer.

Janes has lived on Twentieth St. for 68 years. “We’re the best of friends,” she said of Craig. “I don’t really know what’s going on. I guess this all just came through my son-in-law.”

He is Gary Burtch — or “Gary the builder,” as Janes calls him.

“I am not opposed to a second storey addition,” wrote Burtch, owner of Haliburton’s G.J. Burtch Construction Enterprises Ltd., in an email to the Star. His company does residential renovations. “I just want the design to be within the guidelines set out by the City’s bylaws.”

In a letter dated July 21 to the Etobicoke committee, he further outlines his concerns with the project: “As a builder/renovator I do appreciate some flexibility in design,” he writes, “but do not feel a proposed design should have as great a negative impact on neighbours as this will.”

He says the home expansion will block sunlight, impede Janes’ view of Twentieth St., and dampen the view out her side door. Burtch also alleges the modern home will decrease the property value of Janes’ old home, which is itself two storeys, noting Craig’s design “is in stark contrast to the existing houses on the street and the surrounding neighbourhood.”

Councillor Mark Grimes had previously submitted a letter to the committee recommending the project’s approval. But now, with Burtch’s letter, Grimes’ office issued a revised letter on Tuesday suggesting the new concerns be addressed. Grimes was not available for comment.

CS&P Architects, Craig’s former employer, has promised to see the project through to completion. Maureen O’Shaughnessy, one of the firm’s principal architects, says it could take eight months to a year to complete. “The design is lovely and not out of keeping with the scale of the neighbourhood,” she says.

Anthony Hommik, a city planner assigned to the project, says the committee won’t approve a project for compassionate reasons. “The decisions that are made by the committee of adjustments are strictly to be made on the planning merits of the application,” he says.

Craig and Ricci say they want the home built in time for memories to be made together with children Elliott, 4, and Maelle, 2.

“I don’t think you want anyone with a terminal illness lining up saying ‘I want to build the Taj Mahal on my street,’” says Ricci, 35. “That’s not the point.” He says they are considering Burtch’s concerns.

“I think it’s only fair that we can create a life just like some other residents were able to do when they built their house in the 40s.”

Craig hopes to turn her modern home into an open and creative space for her family. “A space I can interact with after I pass,” she calls it.

She hopes the design will foster “special moments” for her boy and girl. Their bedrooms will connect through the shared wall by way of secret passageways, “caves and tree houses,” while they are young, and transform into closet space when they get older.

Craig wants them to live in “a house that is creative, and takes chances, that is trying to say something. You can learn that you can do things that are out of the box, and you can achieve beautiful things through doing that.”

Submit News to CKA News Ontario?s battle over 3-litre milk jugs on grocery shelves
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 06:00:00 EDT

A spat over milk containers is souring relations between dairy farmers and manufacturers.

For months, Ontario’s milk bureaucracy has been battling over whether you should be able to buy 3 litres of milk in the grocery store.

On one side are the milk processors, represented by the Ontario Dairy Council, who want to open up the market entirely to 3-litre milk containers.

On the other is the Dairy Farmers of Ontario, which is concerned that 3 litres of milk will prove so popular that the 4-litre option disappears off shelves entirely.

“Our interest is only in ensuring that consumers are protected, and we are of the view that the 4-litre containers are essential, and we want to make sure that they continue with respect to the plastic bags,” said Graham Lloyd, general counsel for the DFO.

The dispute started last December, when Ontario’s farm products marketing board gave Mac’s Convenience Stores permission to sell 3-litre plastic milk jugs — only jugs, not bags — on a one-year pilot program.

The Ontario Dairy Council appealed, arguing that such a limited program would give some processors an unfair head start in the 3-litre field. It favours a general ruling with no restrictions on container type or retailer.

After initial arguments over jurisdictional rights and access to redacted documents, the issue is now heading for the quasi-judicial Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Appeal Tribunal.

Related stories on thestar.com:

Farmer takes battle over raw milk to Ontario appeal court

Toronto’s boldest ice cream flavours: jellyfish-miso, anyone?

Three new Ontario microdairies launch single-herd milk

It all revolves around a directive deep down in Ontario’s Milk Act, in section 8 of Regulation 753: Size of Containers.

The Milk Act sanctions any container smaller than 500 millilitres or larger than 4 litres. A container of 1, 1.5, 2, or 4 litres is perfectly OK.

But a 3-litre container? Forbidden, under section 18: Offences.

“This isn’t a new idea, many processers and some retailers have wanted to do this for a long time” said Christina Lewis, president of the Ontario Dairy Council.

“The farmers will not agree to opening up the market to a 3-litre, because there’s concern that perhaps the sales in 4-litre will move toward a 3-litre instead,” Lewis said. “And the 4-litre is really where most of the sales in fluid milk are.”

Lloyd said the DFO is concerned not only with selling milk in larger quantities, but in keeping the price low on a per-volume basis.

“It’s our mandate to grow markets, and sell more milk, and that’s what we want to do,” he said. “The concern about smaller container sizes is if it represented eliminating larger containers, and eliminating that choice, and having a potential price impact.

“That’s why we want a test market to see what would happen.”

Al Mussell, a researcher at Guelph’s George Morris Centre who specializes in dairy economics, said dairy farmers may be worried about losing the special place 4-litre milk containers have as “loss-leaders” for grocery stores — products that don’t make much profit for retailers, but are priced low to get customers in the door.

“This is the game that’s been played with bottled milk for a very long period of time in Canada,” Mussell said. “If you start messing with that 4-litre category, you start to run the risk that stores reconsider milk as a loss-leader. And if they did something like that, it could make a very big difference to the dairy farmers.”

The Ontario Farm Products Marketing Commission, which approved the Mac’s pilot project, declined requests for comment on this issue. Mac’s Convenience Stores did not return several calls.

A date has not yet been set for the tribunal hearing between the commission and the Ontario Dairy Council.

“It’s a shame that it has to go this way, because we’re certainly not trying to block innovation and that new product size,” said Lewis. “It’s just about a level playing field, that’s our position in principle.”

Submit News to CKA News Canada?s wild digital frontier needs policing
Wed, 09 Feb 2011 03:08:26 Z
John Ivison: The copyright bill has a number of provisions that are far less favourable to Canada’s performers and creators, who are about to see take a big hit to their pocket-books
Submit News to CKA News Election buzz, stale rhetoric ? Parliament has deja vu all over again
Tue, 01 Feb 2011 11:42:28 Z
John Ivison: If you missed Question Period Monday, don’t worry — you have a golden opportunity to miss it again Tuesday
Submit News to CKA News Death of Personal Responsibility: Think outside the lunchbox
Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:50:39 Z
Neil Seeman: So what should the role of the state be in combating obesity? It’s time to think outside of the lunchbox, and try a whole new idea: healthy living vouchers, or HLVs
Submit News to CKA News Don?t give Quebec a nickel
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:57:55 Z
Jonathan Kay: If Harper says no to the Bloc's demands, he will be going to the voters as a man of principle who stood his ground on a subject far more important to this country than corporate tax rates
Submit News to CKA News Stelmach more than a victim of changing attitudes
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:38:13 Z
Kevin Libin: Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach bet the fortune of his party’s unparalleled political dynasty on a leadership strategy that failed to pan out
Submit News to CKA News Dave Taylor a mixed blessing for fledgling Alberta Party
Tue, 25 Jan 2011 02:34:30 Z
Kevin Libin: The addition of former Liberal MLA Dave Taylor to the Alberta party gives it a legitimacy boost, but does the outspoken former radio personality fit with the party's post-partisan dreams?
Submit News to CKA News Playing by China's rules
Sun, 23 Jan 2011 19:21:17 Z
Rex Murphy: China has reached an agreement with the Newfoundland government to begin the importation of seal and seal products into its potentially vast market. This is both very good and rare news for Newfoundland sealers
Submit News to CKA News Canada: Nanny AND wimpy state?
Thu, 20 Jan 2011 20:08:14 Z
Before, there actually had to be a violent protest before public institutions caved in and cancelled controversial events. Now, a group of unhinged zealots make a couple of angry phone calls and – poof! – they silence free speech and free assembly
Submit News to CKA News Executives probably not swayed by Liberal tax plan
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 23:54:00 Z
Scott Stinson: It’s a safe bet that Mr. Ignatieff did not win many converts with his tax-increase sales pitch to Canadian executives on Tuesday. This is not a great surprise
Submit News to CKA News Conservatives missed the call for more civilized debate
Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:58:11 Z
Kelly McParland: The federal Conservatives’ brain trust must have been somewhere else when President Barack Obama delivered his speech in Arizona last week, calling for greater civility in political debate.
Submit News to CKA News Harper's five years: Canadians better off, even if they don't feel it
Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:21:36 Z
John Ivison: Jan. 23 marks the fifth anniversary of Stephen Harper’s 2006 election victory and in early February, he will pass Lester B. Pearson’s time in office to become Canada’s 11th longest-serving Prime Minister

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