Canada Newswatch

The CKA Canada Newswatch is a companion to our in-house Canada News system.
The Newswatch is a collection of various Canadian news feeds in one convenient location.


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Click the Submit News-link to CKA News button to quickly submit news.

Daily Canada Newswatch

Submit News to CKA News Letters: ?We are destroying our civilization?
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:10:25 +0000

Maclean's readers write in

The post Letters: ‘We are destroying our civilization’ appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Group uses Winnipeg boil-water advisory to highlight First Nation water woes
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 20:03:17 +0000

Shoal Lake 40 First Nation, which provides Winnipeg with water through an aqueduct, has been under a boil-water advisory for 17 years

The post Group uses Winnipeg boil-water advisory to highlight First Nation water woes appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Canadian woman, toddler drown in Costa Rica
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:20:07 -0500

A Montreal retiree drowned while trying to save her grandniece from rough waves in Costa Rica.
Submit News to CKA News Kathleen Wynne says passage of sports betting bill would help gaming industry
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:01:43 EST

OTTAWA—Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne said a change to sports betting rules would benefit the gaming industry, but stopped short of shaming the Senate for taking so long to approve the legislation.

Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa had urged the Senate on Wednesday to approve an amendment to the Criminal Code to allow single-game wagers, which was passed unanimously by the House of Commons nearly three years ago but has yet to become law.

“I think that Minister Sousa is just saying that it’s there and it would be to the benefit of the gaming industry for it to go forward,” Wynne told reporters ahead of the Council of Federation meeting in Ottawa Thursday.

“He’s not making a moral judgment. He’s just saying that’s the reality we are confronting,” Wynne said.

The premier made the remarks at a news conference alongside federal Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, who last week expressed a different opinion about the Senate delaying the passage of Bill C-290, arguing they were just doing their jobs by scrutinizing legislation that had passed without much study.

Trudeau noted Thursday that since he had removed all Liberal-appointed senators from his caucus, he has no control over how quickly or slowly they move.

“I don’t get to hurry them or push them,” said Trudeau.

“I am sure that they are taking the responsible amount of deliberations, but I did say that I encouraged legislators of all different types to address issues in a responsible and forthright manner,” Trudeau said.

Sports betting is already legal in Ontario, but only through Pro-Line, where people must place bets on at least three games at a time.

Submit News to CKA News QP Live: The Harpers play good cop, bad cop
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:57:52 +0000

Your daily dose of political theatre

The post QP Live: The Harpers play good cop, bad cop appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Ottawa MS patients sought for test of promising new stem-cell therapy
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:51:46 Z
At a time when there is growing concern about patients travelling overseas for unproven treatments, Canadian doctors are beginning clinical trials of stem cell therapy they say offers real hope for people with multiple sclerosis. Dr. Mark S. Freedman, director of the multiple sclerosis research unit at The Ottawa Hospital, will lead the Canadian trials […]
Submit News to CKA News Millions spent on consultants for access to information
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:49:45 Z
The federal government has spent approximately $57 million on outside consultants to handle access to information requests over the past nine years.
Submit News to CKA News Clumsy Calgary thieves break into casino and steal an ATM that had no money in it
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:44:43 +0000
Watch: Security footage shows the culprits loading the ATM onto a dolly, the machine at one point toppling on top of one of the crooks as they exit the building
Submit News to CKA News Canada's flu shot offered little or no protection this season: study
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:42:52 -0500
A new study suggests this year's flu vaccine has offered little or no protection in Canada against becoming sick enough to require medical care.
Submit News to CKA News ?He saved my life': Ottawa woman who lost legs in train accident searches for her guardian angel
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:39:08 +0000
From her hospital bed in Montreal, Sarah Stott has two wishes: to come home to Ottawa and to find her guardian angel
Submit News to CKA News Student-turned-dominatrix awarded $1.5M after car accident left her with brain injury and a new personality
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:36:54 +0000
After the accident, Alissa Afonina showed no impulse control, could not carry through on tasks and began to make inappropriate sexual comments, a B.C. court heard
Submit News to CKA News Older Canadians? timely access to health care ranked last by survey
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:34:49 -0500
More than half of Canadians 55 and over have to wait at least two days to see their doctors when they are ill, according to a new survey
Submit News to CKA News Transit referendum's Yes campaign gets new website, Twitter account
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:30:46 Z
The Yes side in the upcoming referendum on a 0.5 per cent congestion improvement tax for transportation ramped up its online presence with a new website and twitter account launched late Wednesday.
Submit News to CKA News Toronto turns down loan offer from province to plug $86-million budget hole
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:27:09 EST

The Mayor John Tory administration has balked and walked at the province’s terms for a line of credit to plug an $86 million hole in Tory’s proposed city budget.

The news that Toronto will look elsewhere for better loan terms suggests a stunningly quick deterioration in Tory’s warm relationship with Premier Kathleen Wynne that he touted as an asset during last year’s civic election.

“We have concluded that the city can do better on its own,” Tory told reporters on Thursday afternoon in announcing the city would turn down the loan offer from the province. “We thank the province for its offer, but in the end, we will take care of our own house.”

Tory said the terms of the offer, including the securing of city land, were the reasons for backing away from the loan option.

Tory did not reveal how he planned to find $86 million to balance the budget, but promised not to gut services or raise property taxes above the rate of inflation. It’s not clear what savings or efficiencies could be found in the current draft budget to make up that shortfall.

Tory announced last week that he would take Ontario’s offer of a $200 million line of credit to free up $86 million this year to offset the province’s phase-out of annual grants for social housing.

City and provincial staff were working out terms and details, senior Toronto staff had said prior to Thursday’s surprise spurning of the bailout.

Without a cash injection to make up the gap, Tory cannot deliver his proposed 2.75 per cent property tax hike and $170 million in new investments including reversing previous TTC cuts, new shelter beds and a dramatic increase in the number of paramedics.

Councillor Gary Crawford, the city’s budget chief, said Wednesday that normally the city cannot borrow money to pay operating expenses, but there are ways to make a line-of-credit from a bank work for the budget.

“We deal with financial institutions so, hypothetically, we could,” got to one of them for a line of credit, Crawford said.

Tory made meeting Wynne a top priority last December in his first week of office and says he raised one issue — the need for relief from the grant phase-out so that he could deliver a below-inflation property tax hike and significant increased spending on priority areas.

City officials left the meeting optimistic but were surprised when the province recently offered to provide cash by buying city land in transit corridors — an offer spurned by the city, two sources say.

The fallback offer from Finance Minister Charles Sousa of a line of credit at “market” interest rates, secured by city land, followed.

Wynne said shortly before Tory’s announcement that he had not told her government it was spurning the deal.

“We made an offer to help them by allowing a line of credit that would be secured and would be at market rate . . . I literally do not know what their decision will be,” Wynne told reporters in Ottawa ahead of the first ministers meeting Thursday.

With files from Joanna Smith

Submit News to CKA News Sports bars brace for super business on Super Bowl Sunday
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:19:47 Z
A half-dozen superfans staked their seats for Super Bowl Sunday at G Sports Bar and Grill on Granville St. immediately after the Seattle Seahawks made the final, and it wasn’t long after that the establishment was booked solid for what manager Jaclyn Dean says will be its biggest day of the year.
Submit News to CKA News Nigerian president?s convoy stoned by angry mob
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:18:13 EST

JALINGO, NIGERIA — Youths angry at the Nigerian government’s failure to fight Islamic extremists threw stones Thursday at President Goodluck Jonathan’s electioneering convoy in the eastern town of Jalingo, breaking windshields and windows on several vehicles. An Associated Press reporter was unable to see if anyone was hurt.

Police used tear gas and whips to disperse the mob.

From Jalingo, Jonathan flew to Yola, capital of Adamawa state, where officials had declared the route of his motorcade a no-go area. The presidential cavalcade already had been stoned in northern Katsina city and northeast Bauchi last week. Youths in Bauchi flung shoes and plastic bottles at Jonathan’s podium at a rally.

In Jalingo, soldiers guarded billboards and posters of Jonathan, who is running for re-election on Feb. 14. Protesters shouted that the troops should instead be fighting the Boko Haram insurgents blamed for the deaths of some 10,000 people in the past year.

“Why are they using soldiers and other security operatives? They should be deployed to Sambisa and fight with Boko Haram, not with innocent civilians,” one youth yelled as he tore down a poster of a smiling Jonathan.

Sambisa Forest is where the insurgents have camps and where they are believed to be holding some of the 276 schoolgirls abducted from a boarding school in the remote town of Chibok in April — a mass kidnapping that brought international outrage.

Dozens of the girls escaped on their own but 219 remain missing, a reminder of the failures of Nigeria’s government and military.

Yola and Jalingo are housing tens of thousands of people driven from their homes in the 5-year-old insurgency.

It is unclear if the more than 1 million people displaced by the insurgency will be able to vote. Hundreds of thousands have taken refuge in neighbouring Cameroon, Chad and Niger. And it is not known how many tens of thousands remain in more than 100 village and towns in the northeast held by the insurgents.

Nigeria’s home-grown Boko Haram group has been attacking Cameroonian villages and troops, broadening the conflict and raising fears among Nigeria’s neighbours.

A summit of the African Union in Ethiopia this week will address the need for a multinational force to fight the Nigerian extremists.

Submit News to CKA News Army orders inquiry into alleged wrongful dismissal of rape accuser
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:12:30 -0500

The Canadian Army has ordered an inquiry into the treatment of a former corporal who says she was dishonourably discharged for accusing a commanding officer of rape.
Submit News to CKA News Montreal man with winning numbers has no claim to $27M jackpot because he was seven seconds too late
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:10:14 +0000
On Thursday, the Montreal man?s fight to claim half of a $27 million jackpot from 2008 came to a end as the supreme court ruled that it would not hear his appeal
Submit News to CKA News Photo essay: Gathering dust, but in the name of art
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 18:01:00 +0000

Broom in hand, photographer Klaus Pichler collected samples by the hundreds to document in stunning ways?and got some strange looks

The post Photo essay: Gathering dust, but in the name of art appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News University of Ottawa to follow task force?s sexual harassment recommendations
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:59:17 EST

OTTAWA — The president of the University of Ottawa says the school will implement a comprehensive plan to combat sexual harassment and violence in the wake of a sex assault scandal that swamped its men’s hockey team last year.

Allan Rock says the university will adopt the 11 recommendations presented Thursday by a task force which was formed last year after a pair of sexual violence incidents.

He says the aim is to encourage respectful behaviour, prevent sexual violence and ensure that students and employees can work free of harassment and sexual violence.

Last February, members of the university men's hockey team were involved in an alleged sexual assault and the team was suspended for the season.

That was followed by Facebook incident in which sexually derogatory and violent comments were directed against the female president of the student federation.

Rock says the university will teach students about sexual consent, train managers and staff on harassment and sexual violence issues and devise a fair and open process to deal with cases of misbehaviour.

Submit News to CKA News Judge rejects Ontario man?s ?racist will? that disinherited daughter for having ?bastard white son?
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:54:09 +0000
A Newmarket judge ruled that a Jamaican-born rector's last will be overturned because the reason for disinheriting his daughter was based on a 'racist principle'
Submit News to CKA News Video: Translink unveils bus driver safety shields
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:49:48 Z
TransLink unveils its first bus barrier prototype aimed at helping to reduce assaults against bus drivers in Metro Vancouver.
Submit News to CKA News Police were at Vancouver Island house before man was shot; two suspects arrested
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:42:44 Z
Two hours before a 38-year-old man was shot several times in a house in Langford Tuesday night, West Shore RCMP were there responding to a disturbance.
Submit News to CKA News Ottawa woman, 22, who lost both legs in train accident hopes to be home soon
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:41:56 -0500

After a frustrating bureaucratic battle, a young woman who lost both legs and six fingers after she was hit by a train in Montreal last month will hopefully be coming home to Ottawa in a few weeks.
Submit News to CKA News One in five B.C. residents are fans of the Seattle Seahawks, poll finds
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:38:05 Z
An Insights West survey has found that about one in five B.C. residents describe themselves as ‘hardcore’ or ‘regular’ fans of the Seattle Seahawks who are in this Sunday’s Super Bowl football game.
Submit News to CKA News Bestsellers, week of Jan. 27
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:34:46 +0000

The hottest titles in fiction and nonfiction

The post Bestsellers, week of Jan. 27 appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Canadian special forces not in combat, but assisting Iraqi combat: Lawson
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:33:00 -0500
The country's top military commander says he didn't anticipate special forces troops would be guiding air strikes for Kurdish fighters when he gave public assurances about the mission last fall.
Submit News to CKA News Lower loonie: Taking stock of the winners, losers
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:14:00 -0500
The value of the Canadian dollar continues to drop, tumbling below the 80 cent threshold. While some economists say the currency?s drop represents a return to the Canadian dollar's "natural" value, what it also means is changes in the way Canadians shop.
Submit News to CKA News Most Ontarians have no idea a group of foreign multinationals own the Beer Store: poll
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 17:11:19 +0000
Upon hearing who owns the Beer Store, most participants were displeased, with 68% somewhat or strongly disapproving of the chain?s foreign ownership
Submit News to CKA News Quebecer 7 seconds too late for $13.5 million lottery jackpot as court rejects case
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:05:48 EST

OTTAWA — Timing, it is said, is everything.

Just don’t say that to Joel Ifergan.

A lottery ticket the Quebecer purchased in May 2008 turned out to have all the winning numbers, leaving him thinking he had hit a $13.5-million jackpot.

There was just one problem — he had put the ticket on seven seconds past the deadline.

Ifergan’s bid to get his hands on the windfall reached the end of the road Thursday when the Supreme Court of Canada announced it would not hear his case.

Ifergan alleged the transaction was concluded on time and that the lag of the Loto-Quebec terminal is what cost him the massive payout.

He lost his initial legal challenge in Quebec Superior Court in 2012 and again at the Quebec Court of Appeal in 2014.

Submit News to CKA News $27-million, gone in seven seconds: Top court quashes Quebecker's bid to claim jackpot
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:00:40 -0500
Ruling ends an accountant?s seven-year legal battle to claim his share of the prize
Submit News to CKA News Blind mom sees her baby thanks to Ottawa company's glasses
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:57:23 -0500

An Ottawa specialized eyewear company has been inundated with phone calls after a video about one of their clients went viral.
Submit News to CKA News Newsmaker of the day: Edward Snowden
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:54:46 +0000

Newsmaker, Jan. 29: New report obtained by Snowden reveals Canada's electronic spy agency monitors millions of daily downloads

The post Newsmaker of the day: Edward Snowden appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Opinion: Inefficient drug coverage costs Canadian employers $5 billion
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:53:00 Z
The biggest part of an employee’s benefits package is their drug plan. And unlike public drug plans in Canada, private plans are notoriously inefficient, often covering higher priced drugs that do not deliver better health outcomes for users or using sub-optimal renewal intervals.
Submit News to CKA News Fortney: Her Excellency Sharon Johnston celebrates Calgary charities
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:46:41 Z
When meeting representatives of royalty, one can always count on a poised, polished guest of honour and a large entourage. What I hadn’t factored in was the charm offensive of Her Excellency Sharon Johnston, wife of Canada’s Governor General David Johnston. On Tuesday morning, Johnston and her crew touched down in Calgary for a whirlwind day that […]
Submit News to CKA News U of Ottawa to follow task force report on sexual harassment
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:46:38 +0000

University president Allan Rock says university will adopt the 11 recommendations presented by task force

The post U of Ottawa to follow task force report on sexual harassment appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News 'Take a breath, boil some water' - Winnipeg Free Press
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:45:32 GMT

Winnipeg Free Press

'Take a breath, boil some water'
Winnipeg Free Press
What are coliform bacteria? Coliform bacteria are microscopic organisms found in soil, water and in the feces of birds and mammals. While they don't all cause illnesses in people, their presence is considered an indicator of the presence of harmful pathogens ...
Siloam Mission desperate for water, dips into summer reserveCBC.ca
Power outages as Winnipeggers cope with boil-water advisoryCTV News
Rally to highlight 17-year boil water advisory in Shoal lakeThe Carillon
Westman Journal -Edmonton Journal
all 330 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Canadian Muslim group linked to terror financing denies wrongdoing
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:42:39 -0500

The Muslim Association of Canada (MAC), accused of funnelling money to a Hamas-linked charity, said it hasn't supported the group since IRFAN-Canada's charity status was revoked in 2011.
Submit News to CKA News Quebec man 7 seconds too late for share of $27M lotto jackpot: Supreme Court
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:36:13 -0500

A Quebec man who bought a Lotto Super 7 ticket seven seconds after the deadline won't be able to collect half the $27-million jackpot and will also have to cover the court costs after the Supreme Court dismissed his case Thursday.
Submit News to CKA News Adam Cyr guilty in death of ex-girlfriend's toddler - CTV News
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:30:57 GMT

CTV News

Adam Cyr guilty in death of ex-girlfriend's toddler
CTV News
REGINA - A Regina jury has found a man guilty of second-degree murder in the death of a two-year-old toddler. Adam Cyr, who is 34, was on trial for killing his former girlfriend's child in June 2012. The jury was told Natalia Shingoose died from repeated, ...
Adam Cyr guilty of 2nd-degree murderCBC.ca
Adam Riley Cyr found guilty of second-degree murderRegina Leader-Post
Adam Cyr guilty of toddler murderGlobalnews.ca

all 16 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News James Landry sentenced to 14 years in 'murder for lobster' case - CBC.ca
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:25:33 GMT

CBC.ca

James Landry sentenced to 14 years in 'murder for lobster' case
CBC.ca
Cape Breton fisherman James Joseph Landry was sentenced today to 14 years in prison, less time served, for the killing of a Petit-de-Grat man in the so-called ?murder for lobster? case. Chief Justice Joseph Kennedy handed down the term in Port ...
Cape Breton fisherman gets 14 years in 'murder for lobster' caseCTV News
Crown seeks 15-year sentence in Cape Breton's murder-for-lobster caseThe Globe and Mail
Crown seeks 15-year prison sentence in Cape Breton lobster slayingBridge River Lillooet News

all 23 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Regular banning substitution of Canadian ads during Super Bowl
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:23:58 +0000

New rule will be officially in place for the 2017 Super Bowl

The post Regular banning substitution of Canadian ads during Super Bowl appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News More than $3.4B in new revenue belies Tory claim of lowering taxes: Liberals - CTV News
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:23:09 GMT

CTV News

More than $3.4B in new revenue belies Tory claim of lowering taxes: Liberals
CTV News
OTTAWA -- As Canadians begin to look forward to a series of new federal tax measures kicking in soon, newly-released figures show changes to taxes and tariffs are also helping bolster the government's bottom line. Data tabled in the House of Commons this ...
Figures belie claim of lower taxes: LiberalsYorkRegion.com

all 32 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Reevely: Most don't know who owns The Beer Store, don't like it when we find out, says poll
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 16:13:06 Z
Most Ontarians don’t know who owns The Beer Store, aren’t happy when they find out it’s multinationals that aren’t based here, and don’t think much of the owners’ attempt to make peace with Ontario-based craft brewers, a new poll has found. I’m not familiar with polling firm Mainstreet Technologies, and I’m a touch skeptical of […]
Submit News to CKA News U of O rolls out 11-point action plan to combat sexual harassment
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 11:04:28 -0500
Last February, members of the university men?s hockey team were involved in an alleged sexual assault and the team was suspended for the season
Submit News to CKA News Bell Let's Talk breaks records, raises more than $6M for mental health
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:57:00 -0500
Canadians opened up the dialogue on mental health Wednesday, contributing more than 122 million tweets, texts, calls and social media shares on Bell Let's Talk Day.
Submit News to CKA News Burnaby quantum computer maker D-Wave pulls in $29 million in funding
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 15:55:13 Z
D-Wave Systems, maker of the world's first quantum computer, announced Thursday it has closed a $29-million funding round, bringing the total investment raised by the company in the past year to $62 million.
Submit News to CKA News Canadian viewers will get to see U.S. ads during 2017 Super Bowl
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:51:12 EST

Canadians tired of being denied American Super Bowl ads will get to see what all the fuss is about — just not yet.

Starting in 2017, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) will no longer allow broadcasters to request simultaneous substitution during the Super Bowl.

The announcement was made during a speech on the future of television at the London Chamber of Commerce Thursday morning by CRTC chairman Jean-Pierre Blais.

The speech heralded three major changes to CRTC television regulations, stemming from a 15-month dialogue called “Let’s Talk TV” that the commission had with Canadians about what they liked — and didn’t like — about Canadian television. The discussions capture, in the era of YouTube and Netflix, a growing desire for a freedom to choose what one watches, when and where.

But he also warned that, while Canadians demand change, there are stalwarts who want the system to remain the same.

“Those that previously enjoyed entitlements under the old system often make the loudest objections to the new system, set up the strongest roadblocks, and dig in their heels deepest,” he said.

1. Stricter requirements for simultaneous substitution.

For many Canadians, simultaneous substitution — switching American signals for Canadian signals during commercial breaks — is the bane of the sporting season.

This is how it works:

The CRTC allows broadcasters who air American programming (such as CTV or Global) to request distributors (such as Bell or Rogers) to switch over to a Canadian signal during commercial breaks.

Broadcasters love this, because it keeps ad revenues in-house. Blais said simultaneous substitution is worth $250 million annually across the industry.

But Canadians hate it.

Slip-ups in signalling times can cause fans to miss the big play or overtime goal.

And what kind of democracy would deny its citizens the joys of “Wassup,” the Geico gecko or Ali Landry eating Doritos?

Blais said that while Canadians loathe it, the financial cost of ending simultaneous substitution is too great. Instead, new regulations will hope to end some of its biggest annoyances.

Starting in the 2016 football season (so the 2017 Super Bowl), simultaneous substitutions will be banned. It’s the only time during the year when broadcasters will not be allowed to request simultaneous substitution.

Furthermore, Blais said, the CRTC will adopt a “zero-tolerance approach to substantial mistakes.”

If the final touchdown gets cut off because the game ran long and the signal switches to commercial break too soon, broadcasters or distributors could be held responsible and forced to offer their customers a rebate.

2. Over-the-air television will remain free

The CRTC had previously toyed with the idea of allowing local television stations to shut down transmitters that broadcast their signal over the airwaves free, Blais said.

But that didn’t go over well. About 95 per cent of Canadians said that access to over-the-air television was important, Blais said.

Local television stations (who are largely responsible free air signals) get between 40 and 50 per cent of television viewing between the hours of 7 and 11 p.m., Blais said.

Although local free programming is popular, Blais said over-the-air television can’t last forever.

“The future of television lies more toward viewer-centric, on-demand models than the scheduled broadcasts such as those provided by OTA,” he said in London.

3. No preferences for provider’s own programming

Blais also responded to two challenges made by Canadians to the practices of mobile phone and content providers.

Both applications alleged that mobile providers Bell and Vidéotron gave “unfair” preference to their own video content by letting users watch it free on their phones, while charging for video content from other sources, such as YouTube.

The CRTC agrees.

From now on, providers will not be allowed to discount their own content and charge for others, Blais said.

“When the impetus to innovate steps on the toes of the principle of fair and open access to content, we will intervene,” he said.

Submit News to CKA News Conservative government reaps $3.4 billion from tax changes
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:41:44 EST

OTTAWA — As Canadians begin to look forward to a series of new federal tax measures kicking in soon, newly-released figures show changes to taxes and tariffs are also helping bolster the government’s bottom line.

Data tabled in the House of Commons this week shows a variety of tax changes and the elimination of old tax credits will rake in $3.4 billion more for the federal government in 2015-2016.

And those numbers don’t include what the government is making on user fees for services like passports and citizenship or recent new tariffs on imports.

The $3.4 billion figure comes from data in an answer to a question on the order paper by deputy Liberal leader Ralph Goodale.

It’s a telling answer, albeit an incomplete one, he said in an interview.

“It says that this government has been contrary to what they constantly assert — that they only reduce taxes, they never increase taxes,” he said.

“The evidence is that they have over the last number of years generated billions of dollars in increased taxes and they can deny all they like, but the evidence is clearly there in the answer to this question. So the government’s position is entirely hypocritical.”

Making up the $3.4 billion is everything from the removal of a deduction for safety deposit boxes to a decrease in the tax breaks for credit unions.

In its response to Goodale’s question, the Finance Department says the overall federal tax burden to Canadians is at its lowest level in more than 50 years.

“The government has provided significant tax relief for individuals, families and businesses, further contributing to an environment where Canadians can succeed and Canadian businesses can grow, create new well-paying jobs and compete internationally,” the department says in the answer.

In some cases, the department argues, the new taxes are a result of an attempt to streamline older programs, such as the new tax structure for scientific research programs.

Though Goodale had asked for a breakdown of all new tariffs, service charges and fees since 2005, the government did not provide all of the data.

For example, last year the government raised passport fees from $87 to $120 for a five-year passport, and introduced a 10 year passport at a cost of $160.

That brought in $462.5 million in fees, numbers that are not included in the data provided to Goodale.

His office says they will be pursuing more detailed figures.

Submit News to CKA News No jail for Toronto police officer convicted of G20 assault
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:38:13 EST

A judge has upheld a Toronto police officer’s conviction for assaulting a man with his baton during the G20 summit protests but ruled that he will not serve jail time.

Superior Court Justice Brian O’Marra overturned the 45-day jail sentence and instead ordered Const. Babak Andalib-Goortani, 34, to serve a year of probation and perform 75 hours of community service.

As the decision was read, Andalib-Goortani dropped his head into his hands, at one point resting his head on the table.

Justice O’Marra said the reasons for his decision would follow at a later date.

Andalib-Goortani expects to return to work as a police officer shortly, court heard. He will be expected to perform at least 10 hours of community service per month.

Both Andalib-Goortani and his lawyer Melanie Webb said they had no comment.

In September 2013, Andalib-Goortani was convicted of using excessive force in arresting Adam Nobody as he protested on the lawn of Queen’s Park in June 2010.

Ontario Court Justice Louise Botham said her decision largely hinged on video footage captured of the assault.

In December 2013, Andalib-Goortani was sentenced to serve 45 days in jail but was released on bail pending appeal that same day.

Andalib-Goortani faced a second assault charge for allegedly striking a woman with his baton but was acquitted after a crucial photograph was excluded from evidence.

He continues to face a disciplinary hearing before a police tribunal.

He is the only police officer to have been convicted of assault in relation to the G20 protests. A second officer was acquitted in 2013.

“Well the conviction stays, that’s a great thing because now we have two judges saying he’s guilty,” said Adam Nobody outside the courthouse. “The probation, I would have hoped for more, I would have hoped to see him in jail. I think he deserves jail time.

He added that it would be an “absolute shame” for Andalib-Goortani to continue as a police officer.

“It’s a scary thought that someone who was convicted of assaulting me with a weapon has chance to be a police officer again and carry a gun and a weapon and all that.”

Mike McCormack, head of the police union, said that they will examine the decision and look at the next steps, including a possible appeal.

Crown prosecutor Shawn Porter said all options are being considered.

Andalib-Goortani will return to court on Feb. 27 where his lawyers will argue that he should not have to provide a DNA sample under a court order.

Webb said they expect to argue such an order would be a violation of Andalib-Goortani’s privacy rights.

The police actions during the G20 protests, including mass arrests and ‘kettling,’ have come under recent scrutiny as Supt. David (Mark) Fenton’s disciplinary hearing continues.

Fenton, charged with discreditable conduct and unlawful arrest, is the most senior officer to face a hearing under the Police Services Act in relation to the G20 weekend.

Canadian Editorial/Opinion Newswatch

Warning: MagpieRSS: Failed to parse RSS file. (Undeclared entity error at line 56, column 54) in D:\Hosted Sites\canadaka.net\www\includes\rss_fetch\rss_fetch.inc on line 238 Submit News to CKA News Kathleen Wynne says passage of sports betting bill would help gaming industry
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 14:01:43 EST

OTTAWA—Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne said a change to sports betting rules would benefit the gaming industry, but stopped short of shaming the Senate for taking so long to approve the legislation.

Ontario Finance Minister Charles Sousa had urged the Senate on Wednesday to approve an amendment to the Criminal Code to allow single-game wagers, which was passed unanimously by the House of Commons nearly three years ago but has yet to become law.

“I think that Minister Sousa is just saying that it’s there and it would be to the benefit of the gaming industry for it to go forward,” Wynne told reporters ahead of the Council of Federation meeting in Ottawa Thursday.

“He’s not making a moral judgment. He’s just saying that’s the reality we are confronting,” Wynne said.

The premier made the remarks at a news conference alongside federal Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau, who last week expressed a different opinion about the Senate delaying the passage of Bill C-290, arguing they were just doing their jobs by scrutinizing legislation that had passed without much study.

Trudeau noted Thursday that since he had removed all Liberal-appointed senators from his caucus, he has no control over how quickly or slowly they move.

“I don’t get to hurry them or push them,” said Trudeau.

“I am sure that they are taking the responsible amount of deliberations, but I did say that I encouraged legislators of all different types to address issues in a responsible and forthright manner,” Trudeau said.

Sports betting is already legal in Ontario, but only through Pro-Line, where people must place bets on at least three games at a time.

Submit News to CKA News Toronto turns down loan offer from province to plug $86-million budget hole
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:27:09 EST

The Mayor John Tory administration has balked and walked at the province’s terms for a line of credit to plug an $86 million hole in Tory’s proposed city budget.

The news that Toronto will look elsewhere for better loan terms suggests a stunningly quick deterioration in Tory’s warm relationship with Premier Kathleen Wynne that he touted as an asset during last year’s civic election.

“We have concluded that the city can do better on its own,” Tory told reporters on Thursday afternoon in announcing the city would turn down the loan offer from the province. “We thank the province for its offer, but in the end, we will take care of our own house.”

Tory said the terms of the offer, including the securing of city land, were the reasons for backing away from the loan option.

Tory did not reveal how he planned to find $86 million to balance the budget, but promised not to gut services or raise property taxes above the rate of inflation. It’s not clear what savings or efficiencies could be found in the current draft budget to make up that shortfall.

Tory announced last week that he would take Ontario’s offer of a $200 million line of credit to free up $86 million this year to offset the province’s phase-out of annual grants for social housing.

City and provincial staff were working out terms and details, senior Toronto staff had said prior to Thursday’s surprise spurning of the bailout.

Without a cash injection to make up the gap, Tory cannot deliver his proposed 2.75 per cent property tax hike and $170 million in new investments including reversing previous TTC cuts, new shelter beds and a dramatic increase in the number of paramedics.

Councillor Gary Crawford, the city’s budget chief, said Wednesday that normally the city cannot borrow money to pay operating expenses, but there are ways to make a line-of-credit from a bank work for the budget.

“We deal with financial institutions so, hypothetically, we could,” got to one of them for a line of credit, Crawford said.

Tory made meeting Wynne a top priority last December in his first week of office and says he raised one issue — the need for relief from the grant phase-out so that he could deliver a below-inflation property tax hike and significant increased spending on priority areas.

City officials left the meeting optimistic but were surprised when the province recently offered to provide cash by buying city land in transit corridors — an offer spurned by the city, two sources say.

The fallback offer from Finance Minister Charles Sousa of a line of credit at “market” interest rates, secured by city land, followed.

Wynne said shortly before Tory’s announcement that he had not told her government it was spurning the deal.

“We made an offer to help them by allowing a line of credit that would be secured and would be at market rate . . . I literally do not know what their decision will be,” Wynne told reporters in Ottawa ahead of the first ministers meeting Thursday.

With files from Joanna Smith

Submit News to CKA News Nigerian president?s convoy stoned by angry mob
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 13:18:13 EST

JALINGO, NIGERIA — Youths angry at the Nigerian government’s failure to fight Islamic extremists threw stones Thursday at President Goodluck Jonathan’s electioneering convoy in the eastern town of Jalingo, breaking windshields and windows on several vehicles. An Associated Press reporter was unable to see if anyone was hurt.

Police used tear gas and whips to disperse the mob.

From Jalingo, Jonathan flew to Yola, capital of Adamawa state, where officials had declared the route of his motorcade a no-go area. The presidential cavalcade already had been stoned in northern Katsina city and northeast Bauchi last week. Youths in Bauchi flung shoes and plastic bottles at Jonathan’s podium at a rally.

In Jalingo, soldiers guarded billboards and posters of Jonathan, who is running for re-election on Feb. 14. Protesters shouted that the troops should instead be fighting the Boko Haram insurgents blamed for the deaths of some 10,000 people in the past year.

“Why are they using soldiers and other security operatives? They should be deployed to Sambisa and fight with Boko Haram, not with innocent civilians,” one youth yelled as he tore down a poster of a smiling Jonathan.

Sambisa Forest is where the insurgents have camps and where they are believed to be holding some of the 276 schoolgirls abducted from a boarding school in the remote town of Chibok in April — a mass kidnapping that brought international outrage.

Dozens of the girls escaped on their own but 219 remain missing, a reminder of the failures of Nigeria’s government and military.

Yola and Jalingo are housing tens of thousands of people driven from their homes in the 5-year-old insurgency.

It is unclear if the more than 1 million people displaced by the insurgency will be able to vote. Hundreds of thousands have taken refuge in neighbouring Cameroon, Chad and Niger. And it is not known how many tens of thousands remain in more than 100 village and towns in the northeast held by the insurgents.

Nigeria’s home-grown Boko Haram group has been attacking Cameroonian villages and troops, broadening the conflict and raising fears among Nigeria’s neighbours.

A summit of the African Union in Ethiopia this week will address the need for a multinational force to fight the Nigerian extremists.

Submit News to CKA News University of Ottawa to follow task force?s sexual harassment recommendations
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:59:17 EST

OTTAWA — The president of the University of Ottawa says the school will implement a comprehensive plan to combat sexual harassment and violence in the wake of a sex assault scandal that swamped its men’s hockey team last year.

Allan Rock says the university will adopt the 11 recommendations presented Thursday by a task force which was formed last year after a pair of sexual violence incidents.

He says the aim is to encourage respectful behaviour, prevent sexual violence and ensure that students and employees can work free of harassment and sexual violence.

Last February, members of the university men's hockey team were involved in an alleged sexual assault and the team was suspended for the season.

That was followed by Facebook incident in which sexually derogatory and violent comments were directed against the female president of the student federation.

Rock says the university will teach students about sexual consent, train managers and staff on harassment and sexual violence issues and devise a fair and open process to deal with cases of misbehaviour.

Submit News to CKA News Quebecer 7 seconds too late for $13.5 million lottery jackpot as court rejects case
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 12:05:48 EST

OTTAWA — Timing, it is said, is everything.

Just don’t say that to Joel Ifergan.

A lottery ticket the Quebecer purchased in May 2008 turned out to have all the winning numbers, leaving him thinking he had hit a $13.5-million jackpot.

There was just one problem — he had put the ticket on seven seconds past the deadline.

Ifergan’s bid to get his hands on the windfall reached the end of the road Thursday when the Supreme Court of Canada announced it would not hear his case.

Ifergan alleged the transaction was concluded on time and that the lag of the Loto-Quebec terminal is what cost him the massive payout.

He lost his initial legal challenge in Quebec Superior Court in 2012 and again at the Quebec Court of Appeal in 2014.

Submit News to CKA News Canadian viewers will get to see U.S. ads during 2017 Super Bowl
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:51:12 EST

Canadians tired of being denied American Super Bowl ads will get to see what all the fuss is about — just not yet.

Starting in 2017, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) will no longer allow broadcasters to request simultaneous substitution during the Super Bowl.

The announcement was made during a speech on the future of television at the London Chamber of Commerce Thursday morning by CRTC chairman Jean-Pierre Blais.

The speech heralded three major changes to CRTC television regulations, stemming from a 15-month dialogue called “Let’s Talk TV” that the commission had with Canadians about what they liked — and didn’t like — about Canadian television. The discussions capture, in the era of YouTube and Netflix, a growing desire for a freedom to choose what one watches, when and where.

But he also warned that, while Canadians demand change, there are stalwarts who want the system to remain the same.

“Those that previously enjoyed entitlements under the old system often make the loudest objections to the new system, set up the strongest roadblocks, and dig in their heels deepest,” he said.

1. Stricter requirements for simultaneous substitution.

For many Canadians, simultaneous substitution — switching American signals for Canadian signals during commercial breaks — is the bane of the sporting season.

This is how it works:

The CRTC allows broadcasters who air American programming (such as CTV or Global) to request distributors (such as Bell or Rogers) to switch over to a Canadian signal during commercial breaks.

Broadcasters love this, because it keeps ad revenues in-house. Blais said simultaneous substitution is worth $250 million annually across the industry.

But Canadians hate it.

Slip-ups in signalling times can cause fans to miss the big play or overtime goal.

And what kind of democracy would deny its citizens the joys of “Wassup,” the Geico gecko or Ali Landry eating Doritos?

Blais said that while Canadians loathe it, the financial cost of ending simultaneous substitution is too great. Instead, new regulations will hope to end some of its biggest annoyances.

Starting in the 2016 football season (so the 2017 Super Bowl), simultaneous substitutions will be banned. It’s the only time during the year when broadcasters will not be allowed to request simultaneous substitution.

Furthermore, Blais said, the CRTC will adopt a “zero-tolerance approach to substantial mistakes.”

If the final touchdown gets cut off because the game ran long and the signal switches to commercial break too soon, broadcasters or distributors could be held responsible and forced to offer their customers a rebate.

2. Over-the-air television will remain free

The CRTC had previously toyed with the idea of allowing local television stations to shut down transmitters that broadcast their signal over the airwaves free, Blais said.

But that didn’t go over well. About 95 per cent of Canadians said that access to over-the-air television was important, Blais said.

Local television stations (who are largely responsible free air signals) get between 40 and 50 per cent of television viewing between the hours of 7 and 11 p.m., Blais said.

Although local free programming is popular, Blais said over-the-air television can’t last forever.

“The future of television lies more toward viewer-centric, on-demand models than the scheduled broadcasts such as those provided by OTA,” he said in London.

3. No preferences for provider’s own programming

Blais also responded to two challenges made by Canadians to the practices of mobile phone and content providers.

Both applications alleged that mobile providers Bell and Vidéotron gave “unfair” preference to their own video content by letting users watch it free on their phones, while charging for video content from other sources, such as YouTube.

The CRTC agrees.

From now on, providers will not be allowed to discount their own content and charge for others, Blais said.

“When the impetus to innovate steps on the toes of the principle of fair and open access to content, we will intervene,” he said.

Submit News to CKA News Conservative government reaps $3.4 billion from tax changes
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:41:44 EST

OTTAWA — As Canadians begin to look forward to a series of new federal tax measures kicking in soon, newly-released figures show changes to taxes and tariffs are also helping bolster the government’s bottom line.

Data tabled in the House of Commons this week shows a variety of tax changes and the elimination of old tax credits will rake in $3.4 billion more for the federal government in 2015-2016.

And those numbers don’t include what the government is making on user fees for services like passports and citizenship or recent new tariffs on imports.

The $3.4 billion figure comes from data in an answer to a question on the order paper by deputy Liberal leader Ralph Goodale.

It’s a telling answer, albeit an incomplete one, he said in an interview.

“It says that this government has been contrary to what they constantly assert — that they only reduce taxes, they never increase taxes,” he said.

“The evidence is that they have over the last number of years generated billions of dollars in increased taxes and they can deny all they like, but the evidence is clearly there in the answer to this question. So the government’s position is entirely hypocritical.”

Making up the $3.4 billion is everything from the removal of a deduction for safety deposit boxes to a decrease in the tax breaks for credit unions.

In its response to Goodale’s question, the Finance Department says the overall federal tax burden to Canadians is at its lowest level in more than 50 years.

“The government has provided significant tax relief for individuals, families and businesses, further contributing to an environment where Canadians can succeed and Canadian businesses can grow, create new well-paying jobs and compete internationally,” the department says in the answer.

In some cases, the department argues, the new taxes are a result of an attempt to streamline older programs, such as the new tax structure for scientific research programs.

Though Goodale had asked for a breakdown of all new tariffs, service charges and fees since 2005, the government did not provide all of the data.

For example, last year the government raised passport fees from $87 to $120 for a five-year passport, and introduced a 10 year passport at a cost of $160.

That brought in $462.5 million in fees, numbers that are not included in the data provided to Goodale.

His office says they will be pursuing more detailed figures.

Submit News to CKA News No jail for Toronto police officer convicted of G20 assault
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 10:38:13 EST

A judge has upheld a Toronto police officer’s conviction for assaulting a man with his baton during the G20 summit protests but ruled that he will not serve jail time.

Superior Court Justice Brian O’Marra overturned the 45-day jail sentence and instead ordered Const. Babak Andalib-Goortani, 34, to serve a year of probation and perform 75 hours of community service.

As the decision was read, Andalib-Goortani dropped his head into his hands, at one point resting his head on the table.

Justice O’Marra said the reasons for his decision would follow at a later date.

Andalib-Goortani expects to return to work as a police officer shortly, court heard. He will be expected to perform at least 10 hours of community service per month.

Both Andalib-Goortani and his lawyer Melanie Webb said they had no comment.

In September 2013, Andalib-Goortani was convicted of using excessive force in arresting Adam Nobody as he protested on the lawn of Queen’s Park in June 2010.

Ontario Court Justice Louise Botham said her decision largely hinged on video footage captured of the assault.

In December 2013, Andalib-Goortani was sentenced to serve 45 days in jail but was released on bail pending appeal that same day.

Andalib-Goortani faced a second assault charge for allegedly striking a woman with his baton but was acquitted after a crucial photograph was excluded from evidence.

He continues to face a disciplinary hearing before a police tribunal.

He is the only police officer to have been convicted of assault in relation to the G20 protests. A second officer was acquitted in 2013.

“Well the conviction stays, that’s a great thing because now we have two judges saying he’s guilty,” said Adam Nobody outside the courthouse. “The probation, I would have hoped for more, I would have hoped to see him in jail. I think he deserves jail time.

He added that it would be an “absolute shame” for Andalib-Goortani to continue as a police officer.

“It’s a scary thought that someone who was convicted of assaulting me with a weapon has chance to be a police officer again and carry a gun and a weapon and all that.”

Mike McCormack, head of the police union, said that they will examine the decision and look at the next steps, including a possible appeal.

Crown prosecutor Shawn Porter said all options are being considered.

Andalib-Goortani will return to court on Feb. 27 where his lawyers will argue that he should not have to provide a DNA sample under a court order.

Webb said they expect to argue such an order would be a violation of Andalib-Goortani’s privacy rights.

The police actions during the G20 protests, including mass arrests and ‘kettling,’ have come under recent scrutiny as Supt. David (Mark) Fenton’s disciplinary hearing continues.

Fenton, charged with discreditable conduct and unlawful arrest, is the most senior officer to face a hearing under the Police Services Act in relation to the G20 weekend.

Submit News to CKA News Government had warning about foreign workers and youth unemployment
Thu, 29 Jan 2015 05:00:00 EST

OTTAWA—The Conservative government knew the temporary foreign worker program was causing pressure on youth employment almost a year before reforming the program, documents show.

In an August 2013 briefing note for Employment Minister Jason Kenney, department officials warned that industries which commonly employ young Canadians are also among the employers hiring the most temporary foreign workers.

“Five of the top six industries that employ the most youth were also in the top half of (temporary foreign worker) program users,” reads the document, prepared shortly after Kenney was appointed to the department.

Critics of the temporary foreign worker program have raised concerns that employers were hiring lower-paid foreign workers, rather than Canadian workers. Kenney’s office says reforms made in June 2014, almost one year after the internal briefing, have specifically addressed the issue.

The industries listed as employing a large proportion of youth and foreign workers include accommodation and food service, construction, information and cultural industries, as well as the unspecified “other services.”

The internal documents were obtained by the Opposition New Democrats under access to information law. According to the NDP, the documents prove the governing Conservatives were aware of problems with the temporary foreign worker program — specifically as it relates to youth employment — but took no action until media reports exposed abuse of the system.

“The minister knew what the issue was, because the issue was raised with him. But he selectively chose to ignore the information he had,” said MP Jinny Sims, the NDP’s critic for employment and social development. “It’s only when the story was broken out in the media by CBC that suddenly he couldn’t ignore it anymore.”

Kenney’s director of communications, Alexandra Fortier, disputed the opposition claims. She said the government’s June 2014 overhaul of the system directly addressed the issue of employers hiring lower-paid foreign workers over young Canadians.

“One of our key changes is forcing employers to demonstrate that they tried to recruit Canadian youth and other under-represented groups, like aboriginals and Canadians with disabilities,” Fortier wrote in an email.

“For the first time since the launch of this program in 1973, employers will have to disclose how many Canadians, including young people, applied for a job and will have to explain concretely why they were not hired.”

The documents note that excluding young people from entry-level positions delays the development of the so-called “non-cognitive” skills people pick up on the job: self-management, teamwork, persistence and problem-solving, among others.

“Employers often look for a combination of cognitive and non-cognitive skills acquired through experience and education,” the document reads. “The lack of these skills can mean difficulty with labour market attachment and the loss of opportunity for further skill development. And lack of employment can lead to both cognitive and non-cognitive skill loss over time.”

The national youth unemployment rate was 13.3 per cent in December, essentially unchanged from a year before and almost double the national unemployment rate of 6.6 per cent.

In 2012 — the most recent data available when the briefing note was prepared — Canada fell near the average for youth unemployment among OECD countries, with 20.1 per cent for those aged 15 to 19, and 11 per cent for those aged 20 to 24. Some groups faced higher unemployment rates, such as aboriginal youth (20.9 per cent), recent immigrant youth (22.7 per cent) and youth with disabilities (23 per cent).

Submit News to CKA News Brampton city hall replaces Lord's Prayer with non-denominational one
Wed, 28 Jan 2015 21:33:00 EST

In Brampton City Hall ?Our Father who art in heaven? has been replaced with: ?Inspire us to decisions which establish and maintain a city of prosperity and righteousness where freedom prevails and where justice rules. Amen.?

On Wednesday, when that invocation was recited it drew scorn from residents as the word ?shame? rang throughout a packed council chamber and people questioned why the Lord?s Prayer was recently replaced. The move to a less specifically Christian prayer has pitted many in this deeply diverse and often divided city against each other.

?You have ripped a 130-year tradition right out from under us,? charged Greta Archer, who spoke on behalf of those in attendance, firing her words at councillors, particularly Mayor Linda Jeffrey.

?The majority of people that we have spoken to in Brampton are shocked that the Lord?s Prayer was taken out,? Archer stated, exhorting council to have a proper public debate before any final decision is cemented. ?This was removed so quickly and quietly.?According to three councillors the Star spoke with, Jeffrey asked all members of council, around the time she took office after winning October?s election, if they wanted to keep the Lord?s Prayer.

?I told her I am a practising Catholic, I go to church,? said Councillor John Sprovieri. ?Is it appropriate to recite ?Our Father? in the council chamber? It?s a nice gesture, it keeps in mind the tradition and that we still respect the faith community, believers in God. But is it an appropriate prayer for Brampton, today, with our multi-faith community? I understand that a lot of councillors didn?t care one way or another.

?If it?s put to a vote I would suggest we keep the Lord?s Prayer and also ask the Sikh community, the Muslim community, the Hindu community and all other groups to come up with another prayer that we could also recite. But this one we?re now using, what is that? It?s not praying to anyone, not even Santa Claus. I told the mayor I will not recite it. I didn?t recite it today.?

Jeffrey was asked about her position and claims from members of the public that she pushed for the removal of the Lord?s Prayer for political reasons.

A statement from her office read: ?In 1999 the Ontario Court of Appeal ruled that the practice of reciting the Lord?s Prayer at the beginning of municipal meetings was unconstitutional as it contravened the freedom of conscience and religion provision in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.?

The Supreme Court of Canada is currently set to establish a precedent for all municipalities in a case out of Saguenay, Que., with a decision expected by the summer.

The statement from Jeffrey?s office pointed out that the new invocation being used in Brampton is the same one that is used in the Ontario Legislature.

Responding to blanket statements by members of the public after Wednesday?s meeting that all of Brampton?s faith communities support the reciting of the Lord?s Prayer and it is only ?non-believers? who want it removed, Councillor Gurpreet Dhillon, a practising Sikh, refuted that claim.

?Our mayor consulted with council, without any exterior influence or pressures, and it was decided that we should go with a universal, non-denominational prayer, which I support.?

Archer and others brought a petition Wednesday, addressed to Jeffrey, with 5,000 signatures, demanding the Lord?s Prayer be brought back for recitation at the beginning of council meetings.

Brampton and Mississauga, where council recently decided to keep reciting the Lord?s Prayer, are two cities in the GTA that still follow the practice.

Council decided on Wednesday to refer the issue to a standing committee that will address it next week.

Brampton's non-denominational prayer

?We gather today to reaffirm our commitment of service to our City and the

people who live here. Give to each member of this council a strong and abiding

sense of the great responsibilities laid upon us. Guide us here in our deliberations.

Give us a deep and thorough understanding of the needs of the people we serve.

Help us to use power wisely and well. Inspire us to decisions which establish and

maintain a city of prosperity and righteousness where freedom prevails and

where justice rules. Amen.?

City of Brampton

The Lord's Prayer

Our Father who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy name.

Thy kingdom come.

Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread,

and forgive us our trespasses,

as we forgive those who trespass against us,

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil. Amen.

Submit News to CKA News How Sudbury overtook Toronto as Ontario?s capital: Cohn
Wed, 28 Jan 2015 20:15:38 EST

Escaping the mountain chill, Kashmir’s chief minister traditionally relocates his government every year from the summer capital, Srinagar, to his winter refuge in Jammu.

In Ontario, chief minister Kathleen Wynne does it the other way around.

With no snow on the ground in Toronto, the premier has essentially relocated her government to the wintry environs of Sudbury — in hot pursuit of local voters ahead of a Feb. 5 byelection. Wynne has dispatched much of her cabinet to our putative northern capital since calling the vote, the better to woo and win back locals who turned their backs on her Liberals in the last election.

More than a tale of two provincial capitals, this is about a grudge match pitting two parties, and their two mutually antagonistic leaders, in a high stakes showdown that can’t sink much lower.

The ostensible goal is to give voters a seat at the table. But the subtext is to put NDP leader Andrea Horwath in her place — while Horwath tries to reciprocate by rubbing Sudbury in Wynne’s face.

The NDP snatched the riding from the Liberals in last June’s election, which Horwath trumpeted as a breakthrough (it has swung back and forth over the decades) to cushion the blow of her party losing three Toronto seats. A single riding won’t change the legislature’s standings, where Wynne enjoys a comfortable majority government.

Thanks to that summer election, triggered by the NDP, the Liberals knocked Horwath from her perch wielding the balance of power in the previous minority legislature. Now the byelection battle is personal, the contempt palpable.

Horwath’s hostility toward the premier may be a function of the high opinion many union leaders and progressives hold of Wynne as . . . well, more reliably progressive than the NDP leader. While Horwath kept clamouring to meet ex-premier Dalton McGuinty, she bizarrely snubbed invitations from Wynne for private consultations and they barely speak.

The hostility is reciprocal. After first wooing Horwath, Wynne started lashing out at the NDP leader for failing to support progressive proposals — notably proposed pension enhancements, increases to the minimum wage, and pay hikes for child care or home-care workers.

Wynne can’t countenance Horwath’s unctuous populism, Horwath can’t bear her righteous progressivism. But beyond their mutual disdain is the contempt both parties have shown for Sudbury’s voters.

It begins with the NDP’s former MPP, Joe Cimino, who quit on Sudbury voters less than six months after solemnly seeking a four-year mandate from them — for reasons he refused to disclose (beyond saying he hadn’t realized the extent of travel to Ontario’s summer capital, Toronto; perhaps he assumed Sudbury was our year-round centre of government?).

Mortified by their newest MPP’s stillborn legislative career, the New Democrats were feeling awfully defensive — until Wynne offended everyone by trying to snuff out the career of the previous Liberal candidate, Andrew Olivier. A quadriplegic, Olivier routinely records his phone calls because he can’t take notes — and released tapes of his candid conversations with Liberal luminaries holding out the prospect of government appointments if he stepped aside quietly to make way for another star candidate.

The opposition parties have called in the Ontario Provincial Police and Elections Ontario — the latter is slated to interview Wynne and her deputy chief of staff, Pat Sorbara. While the media-shy Sorbara has maladroitly managed to get her name all over the papers, and put her premier on the spot, it’s hard to see them being busted for bribery.

Any party leader has the right to bounce a candidate, and all of them do — though dumping quadriplegics isn’t especially astute. Nor is it unprecedented to placate someone with a patronage appointment (turns out a spurned Olivier is running as an independent, playing spoiler).

The reason for Wynne’s cold-bloodedness in Sudbury? She’d found a way to freeze out the rival New Democrats — by luring NDP MP Glenn Thibeault to the Liberal fold.

Thibeault was a big catch — a former chair of the federal NDP caucus who was highly thought of and much sought after (when Horwath’s deputy, MPP Gilles Bisson, sought the provincial NDP leadership he proudly trumpeted Thibeault’s endorsement). Despite the bad blood for abandoning the NDP, Thibeault isn’t actually a floor-crosser — he’s going to the people for validation (even if he preferred an appointment over an open party nomination meeting).

Amid the mutual recriminations — New Democrats accusing Liberals of taking voters for granted, while the NDP tries to explain why its ex-MPP took voters for granted — the opposition Progressive Conservatives haven’t a hope in left-leaning Sudbury. What’s a voter to do?

Enjoy the attention, while it lasts. After Feb. 5, Ontario’s winter capital will be repatriated to Toronto. Unlike in Kashmir, our government relocates capitals solely for electoral seasons, not climactic reasons.

Martin Regg Cohn?s Ontario politics column appears Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday. mcohn@thestar.ca , Twitter: @reggcohn

Submit News to CKA News Bizarre courtroom error in fatal dangerous-driving case leads to overturned verdict
Wed, 28 Jan 2015 19:50:00 EST

Every year since Audra Armstrong’s death in a car crash in October 2007, her family has posted a memorial notice in their local paper with a message of love to their “yellow rose of Georgetown.”

After a trial in 2011, a jury convicted Shawn DeForest of dangerous driving causing the death of the 40-year-old mother of two, a passenger on a motorcycle caught in a pileup at the intersection.

But bizarrely, the same jury found DeForest not guilty on a second charge of dangerous driving causing bodily harm, related to the driver of motorcycle.

According to a recent Court of Appeal decision, the acquittal may have been a mistake by the jury.

The jury verdict sheet indicates that the jury meant to find DeForest guilty of the lesser included offence of dangerous driving — it was just never said in court.

“On count two, dangerous driving causing bodily harm, how do you find Shawn DeForest, guilty or not guilty?” the courtroom registrar asked the jury foreperson.

“Not guilty,” the foreperson answered.

However, since an acquittal was entered on the record, the three-judge panel found the only way to fix the irreconcilable verdicts was to acquit DeForest of dangerous driving causing death. He now stands acquitted on both charges.

Now, seven years after her death, Armstrong’s devastated family is struggling to understand how this could have happened.

“It’s totally dreadful,” said Armstrong’s mother, Ellen, from her home in Georgetown. “The fact that he got away with it ... it’s like she died for nothing. It makes me sick. We don’t have a justice system at all, we really don’t.”

No one raised the contradiction in the verdicts until DeForest and his co-accused appealed their convictions and sentences (he was sentenced to 18 months in jail) — and the Court of Appeal found that it was too late to find out what the jury really intended.

“One could reasonably go so far as to say that the jury probably intended to return the verdicts as recorded on the verdict sheet. That is not, however, what happened,” wrote Justice David Doherty on behalf of a panel of three Ontario Court of Appeal judges.

But no inquiry of the jury was carried out at the trial — and no inquiry could be carried out now, he wrote.

“The verdicts must be taken as announced by the jury in open court,” Doherty wrote. “I disregard, because I think I must as a matter of law, the distinct possibility that the real problem lies in the jury’s miscommunication of its intended verdict on count two. This court cannot go behind the verdict announced by the jury.”

He noted that the jury verdict sheet was not signed or dated, and that Superior Court Justice Anne Mullins did not instruct the jury to sign or date the verdict sheet. And while the judge told the jury she would examine the verdict sheet prior to the verdict being read, there is no indication from the record that she did.

“The whole thing is extremely unusual,” said DeForest’s trial lawyer, Michael Quigley, adding that in hindsight it would have been helpful for the jury to have been polled to make sure they agreed with the verdict as read.

The top court found it could not order a new trial on the dangerous driving charges because that would amount to double jeopardy. It could be argued that the jury intended to acquit DeForest because they doubted he was driving dangerously or even driving the car when the left turn causing the initial collision was made, the court found. DeForest always maintained it was his co-accused, Ashley Catton, who was driving.

However, DeForest and Catton were ordered to stand trial again on charges of obstructing police. DeForest did not respond to an interview request made through his lawyer.

Armstrong’s family places the blame on the presiding judge for failing to notice the discrepancy between the verdicts and failing to check the jury verdict sheet.

“As soon as it was read out, we couldn’t believe it,” recalled Armstrong’s older brother David. His wife said, “It’s impossible, there must be a mistake.”

“I thought we had one of the best justice systems in the world. And maybe we do. But this was a farce,” David Armstrong said.

“She was never afraid to try new things,” he said of his sister and friend. “She had the biggest, bravest heart of everyone I know.”

Four weeks before she died, Armstrong had moved to a house in Georgetown with her two children, aged 10 and 12, to be closer to her parents.

“I miss her so much,” her mother, Ellen, said Tuesday, the memory of the sunny fall day when she and her husband, Jack, learned of the crash that is still vivid in her mind.

It still pains her that DeForest never showed any remorse during or after the trial.

“If he said he was sorry and apologized, that was all I wanted,” she said.

Submit News to CKA News Tim Hortons can?t cut more than 20 per cent of HQ staff: Ottawa
Wed, 28 Jan 2015 18:40:36 EST

Ottawa has restricted Burger King from axing more than 20 per cent of corporate staff at Tim Hortons’ longtime headquarters or regional offices, an Industry Canada spokesman confirms.

The newly-merged company Restaurant Brands International is required to “maintain significant employment levels” of non-restaurant employees as part of the list of commitments the fast food behemoth made to get final approval in December from the federal government to seal the $12.5 billion deal.

Although it wasn’t announced at the time, Industry Minister James Moore actually secured a more definitive commitment that Burger King maintain 80 per cent of Tim Hortons’ “entire corporate footprint” at both the Oakville head office and regional offices across Canada, said his press secretary Jake Enwright.

Tim Hortons still refused Wednesday to publicly divulge the exact number of people who were laid off this week, although media speculation has run rampant that up to 40 per cent of middle managers were swept up in the round of layoffs that began Tuesday morning, just six weeks after the controversial takeover was completed.

With an estimated 2,000 employees at both head office and seven regional offices from British Columbia to Nova Scotia and one in the U.S., the restrictions would translate into a maximum of 400 workers potentially impacted.

“This is a private business decision and our thoughts are with those who received this difficult news,” said Enwright.

He pointed out that Tim Hortons franchises, which employ 96,000 restaurant workers, cannot reduce staffing levels under the agreement with Burger King. The beloved 50-year-old doughnut and coffee giant is Canada’s largest restaurant chain.

Industry Canada has the right to take legal action should Burger King break any of its commitments made in the takeover, and has done so in the past in other merger deals.

Restaurant Brands International shares, which replaced Tim Hortons on the Toronto Stock Exchange after the merger December 15, fell 68 cents, or 1.4 per cent, Wednesday to close at $48.

The merger created the world’s third-largest restaurant company, with 18,000 stores and $23 billion in sales. It was originally pitched by executives as the best way to expand Tim Hortons internationally and make the beloved Canadian brand truly global.

When the blockbuster deal was announced last August, critics warned that Burger King’s owner 3G Capital, a Brazil-based investment firm, has a track record of paring staff and slashing costs, and would do the same in a Tims takeover.

“This round of layoffs should serve as a warning to Tim Hortons’ franchisees who depend on support from the company to grow their businesses, taxpayers who expect corporations to pay their fair share, and consumers who expect Tim Hortons to be a community leader in Canada,” said a group of union leaders from Unifor, Teamsters and SEIU Healthcare in a statement Wednesday.

The doughnut chain is not unionized.

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More Business coverage on Thestar.comEND

Submit News to CKA News Woman charged in connection with $11M fraud case
Wed, 28 Jan 2015 17:08:00 EST

The ex-spouse of Jason Robert Laramee, a man accused of defrauding investors of more than $11 million, is now facing fraud charges of her own, Halton police said.

Renata Dawn Schumaker, 43, of Oakville, has been charged with obtaining credit by fraud and fraud over $5,000 following a police investigation that began in 2012.

Police allege that between April 17, 2006 and Jan. 31, 2012, Laramee defrauded several investors of $11 million while he was the owner and operator of Oakville-based investment company RBL Capital Corporation.

Schumaker was married to him at the time.

During May 2007, Schumaker and Laramee allegedly obtained credit by fraud in obtaining a line of credit loan from a financial institution and further perpetrated the fraud by falsely representing Schumaker’s position and income as the alleged vice-president of RBL Capital Corporation.

“Once investigators began to examine further the laundering of finances for the purposes of sentencing, it became apparent to investigators that Renata Schumaker was complicit in her actions and subsequently has been charged,” Halton Police Regional Fraud Unit Det. Sget. Troy Izlakar said.

Schumaker is scheduled to appear in court on March 4.

Submit News to CKA News Canada?s wild digital frontier needs policing
Wed, 09 Feb 2011 03:08:26 Z
John Ivison: The copyright bill has a number of provisions that are far less favourable to Canada’s performers and creators, who are about to see take a big hit to their pocket-books
Submit News to CKA News Election buzz, stale rhetoric ? Parliament has deja vu all over again
Tue, 01 Feb 2011 11:42:28 Z
John Ivison: If you missed Question Period Monday, don’t worry — you have a golden opportunity to miss it again Tuesday
Submit News to CKA News Death of Personal Responsibility: Think outside the lunchbox
Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:50:39 Z
Neil Seeman: So what should the role of the state be in combating obesity? It’s time to think outside of the lunchbox, and try a whole new idea: healthy living vouchers, or HLVs
Submit News to CKA News Don?t give Quebec a nickel
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:57:55 Z
Jonathan Kay: If Harper says no to the Bloc's demands, he will be going to the voters as a man of principle who stood his ground on a subject far more important to this country than corporate tax rates
Submit News to CKA News Stelmach more than a victim of changing attitudes
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:38:13 Z
Kevin Libin: Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach bet the fortune of his party’s unparalleled political dynasty on a leadership strategy that failed to pan out
Submit News to CKA News Dave Taylor a mixed blessing for fledgling Alberta Party
Tue, 25 Jan 2011 02:34:30 Z
Kevin Libin: The addition of former Liberal MLA Dave Taylor to the Alberta party gives it a legitimacy boost, but does the outspoken former radio personality fit with the party's post-partisan dreams?
Submit News to CKA News Playing by China's rules
Sun, 23 Jan 2011 19:21:17 Z
Rex Murphy: China has reached an agreement with the Newfoundland government to begin the importation of seal and seal products into its potentially vast market. This is both very good and rare news for Newfoundland sealers
Submit News to CKA News Canada: Nanny AND wimpy state?
Thu, 20 Jan 2011 20:08:14 Z
Before, there actually had to be a violent protest before public institutions caved in and cancelled controversial events. Now, a group of unhinged zealots make a couple of angry phone calls and – poof! – they silence free speech and free assembly
Submit News to CKA News Executives probably not swayed by Liberal tax plan
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 23:54:00 Z
Scott Stinson: It’s a safe bet that Mr. Ignatieff did not win many converts with his tax-increase sales pitch to Canadian executives on Tuesday. This is not a great surprise
Submit News to CKA News Conservatives missed the call for more civilized debate
Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:58:11 Z
Kelly McParland: The federal Conservatives’ brain trust must have been somewhere else when President Barack Obama delivered his speech in Arizona last week, calling for greater civility in political debate.
Submit News to CKA News Harper's five years: Canadians better off, even if they don't feel it
Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:21:36 Z
John Ivison: Jan. 23 marks the fifth anniversary of Stephen Harper’s 2006 election victory and in early February, he will pass Lester B. Pearson’s time in office to become Canada’s 11th longest-serving Prime Minister

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