Canada Newswatch

The CKA Canada Newswatch is a companion to our in-house Canada News system.
The Newswatch is a collection of various Canadian news feeds in one convenient location.


CKA members can use the Canada newswatch to promote stories from the newswatch to the CKA News Links.

Click the Submit News-link to CKA News button to quickly submit news.

Daily Canada Newswatch

Submit News to CKA News Senators? optional travel spending has plunged by more than 50% since Pamela Wallin audit
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 15:29:42 +0000
Senators have slashed their optional travel spending by more than half in the year since an audit criticizing Sen. Pamela Wallin?s travel habits was released, new spending figures show. Combined, senators spent less than $500,000 on ?other? travel in the 12 months after Wallin was found to have run afoul of Senate spending rules on […]
Submit News to CKA News John Baird suggests long mission ahead in Iraq
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:19:30 EDT

OTTAWA—As the federal cabinet considers sending fighter jets to Iraq, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird suggests Canada and other countries could be in for a long mission.

Baird predicts that battling extremists in Iraq and elsewhere will take time and says Canada is in uncharted territory when it comes to directly engaging terrorist elements.

“Terrorism, radical extremism, this is the great struggle of our generation,” the minister said.

“Whether it’s in Iraq, whether it’s in Nigeria with Boko Haram, whether it’s with Al Shabab in Somalia . . . there’s no quick fixes.”

The federal cabinet is considering the possible deployment of CF-18 jets, along with surveillance aircraft, following an American request for Canada to become more involved in the ever-expanding air war against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

Baird says he won’t speculate on what decision he, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and their cabinet colleagues will reach.

But he told reporters in Ottawa on Tuesday that cabinet will play off recent military experiences in Libya and Afghanistan in deciding.

National Defence officials and critics question how long Canada could sustain such a combat mission, given the age of its fighter fleet and other commitments.

Canada already has four CF-18s flying air policing missions over the Baltic as part of NATO’s eastern European reassurance measures on behalf of Ukraine.

Following the Libya bombing campaign of 2011, there was concern in the air force that the CF-18 fleet was already being driven too hard, even with life-extension upgrades completed under the former Liberal government.

Submit News to CKA News Russia incensed after Ottawa refuses visas to space-conference delegates
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:13:00 -0400
?This act unfortunately does not bring benefit to the Russian-Canadian bilateral relations,? embassy official says
Submit News to CKA News Kamloops man tucked a bottle of Fireball whisky down his pants and fled liquor store, court hears
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 15:02:06 Z
A provincial court in Kamloops has heard that a man who called a police officer a pig after being arrested was Grouchy.
Submit News to CKA News McGill football coach steps down in protest over university?s reaction to domestic assault charges against player
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:59:04 +0000
On Sept. 26 the university issued a statement that said 'This individual should not have been invited to join our team'
Submit News to CKA News Mount Ontake survivors give thanks for split-second decisions
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:56:03 +0000

'It was almost surreal,' guide says. 'I have to remind myself that anything can happen at the mountains.'

The post Mount Ontake survivors give thanks for split-second decisions appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Russia upset over Canadian visa denials for delegates to space conference
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:53:09 -0400
The Canadian government's refusal to allow Russian delegates to attend a prestigious international astronautical symposium has angered Moscow, which said the decision flies in the face of international space co-operation and amounts to a politicizing of space exploration over the conflict in Ukraine.
Submit News to CKA News Conservative government months late with jihadi tracking tool
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:42:28 EDT

OTTAWA?The Conservative government is three months late on delivering a tracking system it continues to tout as a means of stopping homegrown terrorists from joining overseas conflicts.

Under the Canada-U.S. perimeter security pact, the federal government pledged to begin collecting records as of last June 30 on people leaving Canada on international flights.

However, the Tories missed that deadline because legislative and regulatory changes are needed before the plan can take effect.

Canada Border Services Agency spokeswoman Esme Bailey would not reveal a new deadline for the project, saying only that information on proposed changes would be provided in due course.

In an interview broadcast last weekend, Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney said it was important to know when people leave the country and where they are going.

He said the government is working on tools, but made no reference to the missed deadline.

A recent federal report said the government knew of more than 130 individuals with Canadian connections who were abroad and suspected of supporting terror-related activities.

One Ontario man who died in combat in Syria last year had taken part in an elaborate video, widely circulated on the Internet following his death, with the aim of inspiring like-minded young people to wage jihad.

A border services briefing note says information from the new border tracking system could be provided to the RCMP and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. ?This is of particular interest given the recent media attention on Canadians travelling abroad to engage in terrorist activities.?

For now, the system involves exchanging entry information collected from people at the Canada-U.S. land border ? so that data on entry to one country serves as a record of exit from the other.

The first two phases of the program have been limited to foreign nationals and permanent residents of Canada and the United States, but not citizens of either country.

The program was to be expanded by June 30, 2014, to include information sharing on all travellers crossing the land border.

In addition, Canada hoped to begin collecting information on people exiting by air ? something the United States already does ? by requiring airlines to submit passenger manifest data for outbound international flights.

In an emailed statement, Bailey said both Canada and the U.S. remain dedicated to full implementation of the initiative.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security did not reply to questions about the next phase.

This week Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is making his first visit to Canada in the job.

Civil libertarians and privacy advocates have expressed concerns about increased sharing of personal information about Canadians with U.S. security agencies.

Submit News to CKA News McGill football coach Clint Uttley resigns
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:40:39 Z
McGill Redmen football head coach Clint Uttley has stepped down in protest over the reaction of the university to the charges of assault against a player. Uttley has resigned his post saying he cannot work for an organization “that does not embrace equity and inclusiveness.”
Submit News to CKA News The myths about Canada?s skills gap
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:39:26 +0000

Chris Sorensen explains how misperceptions get in the way of solutions.

The post The myths about Canada’s skills gap appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Live: Luka Magnotta murder trial
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:37:50 Z
Follow Sue Montgomery's tweets from Luka Magnotta's first-degree murder trial in Montreal, Tuesday, Sept. 30.
Submit News to CKA News The Gargoyle: The NDP go international
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:37:18 Z
Two NDP executives got a little help for a looming federal election from their international friends.
Submit News to CKA News Crime-scene technician testifies as Magnotta trial enters second day
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:32:17 -0400
Jury of eight women and six men will hear evidence over several weeks in connection with the slaying and dismemberment of Jun Lin in Montreal in May, 2012
Submit News to CKA News Goalie Ryan Miller reboots in Vancouver
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:24:04 +0000

Once hockey?s best, he?s seeking redemption in goaltending?s graveyard ? Vancouver

The post Goalie Ryan Miller reboots in Vancouver appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Canada's blood supply hits 6-year-low, prompting donor appeal
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:24:00 -0400
Canada's blood supply is at a six-year low, prompting an urgent appeal for donors to roll up their sleeves.
Submit News to CKA News Commuter chaos in Toronto after shutdown on Bloor-Danforth subway - The Globe and Mail
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:18:54 GMT

Globalnews.ca

Commuter chaos in Toronto after shutdown on Bloor-Danforth subway
The Globe and Mail
Thousands of Toronto commuters faced long delays during the morning rush hour Tuesday after the TTC suspended subway service along part of the Bloor-Danforth line. The shutdown on Line 2 began just before 8 a.m. when debris was found at track level ...
TTC shuts down Bloor line between Keele and St. George during rush hourNational Post
Hundreds waiting for buses as subway service suspended between Keele and ...Toronto Star
TTC subway service suspended on sections of Bloor-Danforth lineCTV News
Hamilton Spectator -Toronto Sun -CBC.ca
all 14 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Battle against extremists won?t be short, Baird warns
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:10:10 +0000

Foreign Affairs minister says Canada is in uncharted territory when it comes to directly engaging terrorist elements.

The post Battle against extremists won’t be short, Baird warns appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Luka Magnotta case: The challenges of a 'not criminally responsible' defence - CBC.ca
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:06:45 GMT

CBC.ca

Luka Magnotta case: The challenges of a 'not criminally responsible' defence
CBC.ca
Luka Magnotta has admitted killing Concordia University student Jun Lin in May 2012, but his defence lawyers will spend the next few weeks attempting to convince a jury that he is not criminally responsible for that act because he was mentally ill at the time.
Magnotta trial: Day 2 focuses on more evidenceCTV News
Magnotta trial: Crime scene photographer testifiesToronto Sun
Blatchford: Luka Magnotta's lawyer to focus on accused's state of mindSaskatoon StarPhoenix
Toronto Star -Canada News -Globalnews.ca
all 296 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Paul Davis taps Steve Kent as deputy premier - CBC.ca
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:04:00 GMT

CBC.ca

Paul Davis taps Steve Kent as deputy premier
CBC.ca
Premier Paul Davis has appointed Steve Kent, whose support at the recent PC leadership convention helped assure his win, as deputy premier and minister of health. Kent threw his support behind Davis just moments after the first ballot at the Sept.
Premier brings new face into cabinet roomThe Telegram
Premier unveils new cabinetLabradorian
Davis Names Kent Deputy PremierVOCM

all 5 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News What you need to know about the protest in Hong Kong
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 14:00:55 +0000

A guide to the major issues and people in the dispute

The post What you need to know about the protest in Hong Kong appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Foreign Affairs Minister Baird suggests Canada could be in for lengthy mission
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:00:00 -0400
As the federal cabinet considers sending fighter jets to Iraq, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird suggests Canada and other countries could be in for a long mission.
Submit News to CKA News Cyclist Mathilde Blais?s death was avoidable: Coroner
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:59:47 Z
The death of 33-year-old cyclist Mathilde Blais, killed by a truck while riding to work through the St. Denis underpass on April 28, was avoidable and could have been averted by a simple sharing of the road, Quebec coroner Paul G. Dionne has ruled.
Submit News to CKA News Canadians willing to drive further for cheap gas: survey
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:51:00 -0400
The majority of Canadians are willing to drive further and waste gas in order to save a dollar or two when filling up their tanks, according to a new poll.
Submit News to CKA News McGill football coach quits over school's stand on charged player - The Globe and Mail
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:35:45 GMT

CBC.ca

McGill football coach quits over school's stand on charged player
The Globe and Mail
McGill University's football coach has resigned in protest of the school's reaction to the legal problems of the team's star running back. Luis-Andres Guimont-Mota, who is facing domestic assault charges, had also served a previous sentence for assault.
Clint Uttley, Redmen coach, quits over McGill's Guimont-Mota stanceCBC.ca
McGill football coach Clint Uttley resignsMontreal Gazette
McGill Redman coach resigns amid player controversyCJAD
The Link
all 5 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News The justice of a war against Islamic State
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:30:04 +0000

A roundup of morning news from Maclean's and GlobalPost

The post The justice of a war against Islamic State appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News McGill football coach quits over school?s stand on charged player
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:28:50 -0400
Redmen coach Clinton Uttley says the school knew about Luis-Andres Guimont-Mota?s past criminal convictions when he joined the team
Submit News to CKA News Edmonton postal workers may sell bus passes, report potholes in pilot project - CANOE
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:22:38 GMT

Edmonton postal workers may sell bus passes, report potholes in pilot project
CANOE
A Canada Post letter carrier walks his route in Edmonton, Alta., in this May 30, 2011 file photo. (DAVID BLOOM/QMI Agency Files). Sun. Related Content. article Canada Post reports $53M profit in second quarter · article Doctors note required to keep Canada ...

and more »
Submit News to CKA News Nova Scotia presses on with health-care bill as unions rally in protest - The Globe and Mail
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:20:34 GMT

CBC.ca

Nova Scotia presses on with health-care bill as unions rally in protest
The Globe and Mail
Union protesters blocked traffic outside the Nova Scotia legislature Tuesday morning as the government pushes through legislation that changes the bargaining structure in the health-care system. At one point a car carrying Premier Stephen McNeil was ...
Controversial Nova Scotia health bill up debatedCBC.ca
Tensions high at Province House as Nova Scotia unions protest health law ...TheChronicleHerald.ca
Nova Scotia government defends health merger bill as protesters rally580 CFRA Radio
rabble.ca (blog)
all 40 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Nova Scotia presses on with health-care bill as unions rally in protest
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 09:19:30 -0400
Bill introduced by the province?s Liberal government would merge bargaining units. The government wants to cut the number of units to four from 50 by April 1
Submit News to CKA News Tories three months behind on tracking system aimed at stopping Canadians ... - National Post
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 13:16:10 GMT

National Post

Tories three months behind on tracking system aimed at stopping Canadians ...
National Post
OTTAWA ? The Conservative government is three months late on delivering a tracking system it continues to tout as a means of stopping homegrown terrorists from joining overseas conflicts. Under the Canada-U.S. perimeter security pact, the federal ...
Harper government missed deadline on jihadi tracking toolCBC.ca
Conservatives months late with jihadi tracking tool, no word on completion dateNews1130
Tories months late with jihadi tracking toolSalmon Arm Observer

all 20 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News All Ebola victims in Liberia cremated, leaving families no chance for goodbye
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:55:58 -0400
As the death toll from Ebola soars, crowded clinics are turning over beds as quickly as patients are dying. This leaves social workers and psychologists struggling to keep pace and notify families, who must wait outside for fear of contagion.
Submit News to CKA News Tories three months behind on tracking system aimed at stopping Canadians from joining terrorists overseas
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 12:45:24 +0000
Under the Canada-U.S. perimeter security pact, the federal government pledged to begin collecting records as of last June 30 on people leaving Canada on international flights
Submit News to CKA News Wildlife populations plummet for 3,000 species
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:12:00 -0400
About 3,000 species of wildlife around the world have seen their numbers plummet far worse than previously thought, according to a new study by one of the world's biggest environmental groups.
Submit News to CKA News Blatchford: Luka Magnotta?s lawyer to focus on accused?s state of mind at murder trial
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 12:02:14 Z
MONTREAL — As lawyer Daniel Urbas said Monday, in his kind but un-theatrical manner, of Lin Jun’s poor father, no matter what happens here at the trial of his son’s killer, “It will not get any better for him.” But […]
Submit News to CKA News Blatchford: Luka Magnotta?s lawyer to focus on accused?s state of mind at murder trial
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 12:02:14 Z
MONTREAL — As lawyer Daniel Urbas said Monday, in his kind but un-theatrical manner, of Lin Jun’s poor father, no matter what happens here at the trial of his son’s alleged killer, “It will not get any better for him.” […]
Submit News to CKA News Maple Leaf Square will live on, MLSE says
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:01:15 EDT

Remember the hysteria last week over Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment’s plan to rename Maple Leaf Square after the Ford Motor Company?

Premature and unfounded, the MLSE says.

While a naming rights deal remains in place for the popular Bremner Blvd. gathering spot for Leafs and Raptors fans, MLSE will announce this morning that it will be branded the “Ford Fan Zone at Maple Leaf Square.”

The name accommodates Ford’s corporate branding while preserving the Maple Leaf name, and eliminates confusion over whether the city’s biggest sports and entertainment outfit had named some of its property after controversial Mayor Rob and mayoral candidate and Councillor Doug Ford.

When asked about renaming the meeting place “Ford Square,” marketing experts consulted by the Star last week weren’t impressed.

“You do get awareness but I can’t think of anyone who isn’t already aware that Ford exists and who they are,” wrote Queen’s University marketing professor Ken Wong in an email to the Star.

“If all they want is awareness, they could have it in spades if they gave a Ford vehicle to every charity in Toronto and they’d likely still have money left over versus what they pay to the Leafs.”

Maple Leaf Square’s popularity as a meeting place for fans took off during the Toronto Raptors playoff run last spring, when supporters would congregate outside Gate 5 of the Air Canada Centre and watch games on giant outdoor monitors.

Raptors fans gathered in such numbers and cheered with such ferocity that the square temporarily earned the nickname Jurassic Park.

MLSE and Ford will announce more details of the deal this afternoon.

Submit News to CKA News Manufacturing plant made famous on TV burns to ground - CanadianManufacturing.com
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:59:12 GMT

Vancouver Sun

Manufacturing plant made famous on TV burns to ground
CanadianManufacturing.com
ROULEAU, Sask.?A building made famous by the hit television series 'Corner Gas' about small-town Saskatchewan life has burned to the ground. Grant Clarke, mayor of the small town of Rouleau, Sask., where the former CTV comedy was filmed, said ...
Fire Devastates Saskatchewan 'Corner Gas' TownETCanada.com (blog)
TV show site scorchedRegina Leader-Post
'Corner Gas' building burns downToronto Sun
The Telegram -Saskatoon StarPhoenix
all 84 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Edmonton postal workers may sell bus passes, report potholes in pilot project
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 07:50:59 -0400

Postal workers could start reporting potholes, messy yards and burned out street lights as part of a new City of Edmonton pilot project.
Submit News to CKA News Ezra Levant show narrator reads apology to Justin Trudeau for host's on-air rant - National Post
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:35:35 GMT

National Post

Ezra Levant show narrator reads apology to Justin Trudeau for host's on-air rant
National Post
OTTAWA ? Sun Media apologized on Monday for an on-air rant by its outspoken provocateur, Ezra Levant, about Justin Trudeau and the Liberal leader's famous parents. The apology aired at the beginning of Levant's Sun News Network show. It was read by ...
Justin Trudeau gets apology from Sun MediaCBC.ca
A collection of apologies from Ezra LevantToronto Star

all 73 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News PayPal and eBay reach a fork in the road, announce 2015 split
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 07:30:00 -0400
EBay is splitting off its fastest growing segment, the PayPal payment service, the e-commerce company said Tuesday.
Submit News to CKA News White House front door now locks automatically
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 07:21:00 -0400
Secret Service Director Julia Pierson says the front door to the White House now locks automatically in a security breach.
Submit News to CKA News The new campus sex puritans
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 07:00:00 -0400
California?s new 'affirmative consent' measure is designed to stem a tidal wave of rape that does not exist
Submit News to CKA News Hong Kong protesters threaten wider actions
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:59:33 EDT

HONG KONG—Pro-democracy protesters demanded that Hong Kong's top leader meet with them, threatening wider actions if he did not, after he said Tuesday that China would not budge in its decision to limit voting reforms in the Asian financial hub.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, who has taken a hard line against any perceived threat to the Communist Party's hold on power, meanwhile vowed in a National Day speech to “steadfastly safeguard” Hong Kong's prosperity and stability. He said Beijing believes Hong Kong will “create an even better future in the big family of the motherland.”

China's government has condemned the student-led protests as illegal, though so far it has not overtly intervened, leaving Hong Kong's semi-autonomous government to handle the crisis. But Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying's rejection of the student demands dashed hopes for a quick resolution of the five-day standoff that has blocked city streets, forcing some schools and offices to close.

Leung's statement drew a defiant response from the students.

“If Leung Chun-ying doesn't come out to Civic Square before midnight ... then I believe inevitably more people will come out onto the streets,” said Alex Chow, secretary general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students, the organizer of the university class boycotts that led to the street protests.

Chow said the students were considering various options, including widening the protests, pushing for a labour strike and possibly occupying a government building.

Despite the hardening rhetoric from both sides, the mood Tuesday night as the crowds of protesters swelled was festive. Few police were evident, and those who were appeared relaxed.

Both sides appeared to be waiting out the standoff, as police continued the light-handed approach to the protests they adopted after their use of tear gas and pepper spray over the weekend failed to drive out tens of thousands of people occupying streets near the government headquarters. The sit-ins instead spread to the financial district and other areas.

A brief cloudburst Tuesday cooled the air, seeming to energize the protesters, a group of whom shouted “Jiayou,” or “Keep it up,” and waved their cellphones with bright LED flashlights sparkling in the dark.

The crowd had plenty of umbrellas and rain capes on hand, having stockpiled them as a defence in case police might again deploy tear gas and pepper spray.

“We are not afraid of riot police, we are not afraid of tear gas, we are not afraid of pepper spray. We will not leave until Leung Chun-ying resigns. We will not give up, we will persevere until the end,” Lester Shum, another student leader, shouted to a crowd at Admiralty, near Hong Kong's waterfront.

Leung's blunt rejection of the demands from the students is not surprising. China's Communist leadership is wary of any conciliatory moves that might embolden dissidents and separatists on the mainland.

The protesters want a reversal of a decision by China's government in August that a pro-Beijing panel will screen all candidates in the territory's first direct elections, scheduled for 2017 — a move they view as reneging on a promise that the chief executive will be chosen through “universal suffrage.”

Occupy Central, a wider civil disobedience movement, said in a tweet that the deadline set by the pro-democracy protesters includes a demand for genuine democracy and for Leung's resignation. It said it would “announce new civil disobedience plans same day,” without elaborating.

China took control of Hong Kong from the British in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” arrangement that guaranteed the former British colony separate legal and economic systems and Western-style civil liberties.

Hong Kong's free press and social media give the protesters exposure that may help prevent China from cracking down in the same way it has on restive minorities and dissidents living in the mainland, where public dissent is often harshly punished.

“The people on the streets are here because we've made the decision ourselves and we will only leave when we have achieved something,” said Chloe Cheung, a 20-year-old student at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. “We are waiting for the government to respond to our demands for democracy and a say in what the elections will be like.”

With dozens of bus routes cancelled and some subway entrances near protest areas closed, Hong Kong's police and fire departments renewed their calls for the protesters to clear the streets.

The protests have been dubbed the “Umbrella Revolution” by some because the crowds have used umbrellas to block the sun and to deflect police pepper spray.

Many of the protesters were born after an agreement with Britain in 1984 that pledged to give China control of the city of 7 million, and have grown up in an era of affluence and stability, with no experience of past political turmoil in mainland China.

Their calls for a great say in their futures have widespread support among many in Hong Kong disillusioned by a widening gap between the city's ultra-wealthy tycoons and the rest of the population.

“I am committed to taking part in the protests as long as they remain peaceful,” said Peter Chin, a 22-year-old student at Hong Kong University.

“We are really basically just calling for the government to speak with us but they've been mute. We'll keep staying here until they're ready to consult with us,” he said.

Submit News to CKA News Several boroughs to implement ?Coderre Tax? in face of cuts
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:47:04 Z
The boroughs of Sud-Ouest, Outremont and Plateau Mont-Royal are raising taxes, but they’re making sure citizens know who they believe is to blame for their higher tax bills. Calling it a “Coderre Tax,” the mayors of the three boroughs held a news conference to denounce a new funding formula that will see money cut from the central city allotments of several boroughs and increased to others.
Submit News to CKA News George Clooney and Amal Alamuddin get the People cover
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:44:44 EDT

What? I just bought a copy of People Magazine to see the pictures from the Brangelina wedding. And now it looks like I have to buy the magazine again to gawk at the Clooney/Alamuddin photos. Am I made of money?

This week's issue of People will have "25 exclusive photos of the emotional ceremony, star-studded parties and all the sweet candid moments" and, as was the case with the Brangelina photos, People and Hello have teamed up to buy the photos. We must assume the money will be given to charity. But, who knows ... perhaps the couple will spend the money on hamsters and high heels.

Amal wore Oscar de la Renta and George wore Armani and danced to Cole Porter's "Why Shouldn't I?"

The mother of the bride talked to the magazine: "George and Amal radiated love all night," Alamuddin's mother Baria tells People. "The wedding was so unbelievably special, it was legendary. These three days ? the friends, the families, the atmosphere, everything ? will stay with me all the rest of my life." One of four loved ones to deliver heartfelt speeches during the short ceremony, Baria, an editor at the Arabic newspaper Al-Hayat , addressed Clooney at one point. "I said, 'George, we love you truly, deeply and sincerely. We enjoy your charm, your wit, intelligent conversation and generosity. You are simply perfect.' " Awwww ...

George dad Nick said in his speech: "George and Amal present us with ... belief that in this place and at this moment, love is alive and well."



Submit News to CKA News How did Canada?s economy start the third quarter?
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:41:13 +0000

Your top financial and economic news for Sept. 30

The post How did Canada’s economy start the third quarter? appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Magnotta trial: Jury looks at photos of parcels mailed to Ottawa, Vancouver
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:36:00 -0400
The jury in Luka Rocco Magnotta's first-degree murder trial took a closer look on Tuesday at photos of parcels that were mailed to political offices in Ottawa and schools in Vancouver.
Submit News to CKA News Hong Kong leader says Beijing won't back down
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:30:00 -0400
Pro-democracy protesters demanded that Hong Kong's top leader meet with them, threatening wider actions if he did not, after he said Tuesday that China would not budge in its decision to limit voting reforms in the Asian financial hub.
Submit News to CKA News Streaming giant Spotify arrives in Canada
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:30:00 EDT

After months of bombarding music fans and technology enthusiasts with prelaunch invites, Spotify official enters the Canadian market on Tuesday.

Considered the global leader in music streaming with over 10 million subscribers in 58 countries worldwide, the company enters a market where some of their competitors, including Rdio and Deezer have been operating for years. That said, the company should benefit from curiosity and pent-up demand for a product that has long been available around the world.

“We spent a lot of time studying the market in Canada, and we know that Canada in terms of a music market is one of the most vibrant in the world, so we were really keen to treat this as not just another launch,” said Ken Parks, chief content and managing director, Spotify, in an interview last week. “We’re going to be launching with the most comprehensive Canadian music catalogue in the world.”

Parks cites deals with smaller local labels like Arts & Craft, Dine Alone, Nettwerk and several French-Canadian labels to appeal to the Francophone market. Signing those deals is one of the reasons the launch here was delayed, he said.

There was much speculation almost two years ago that Spotify was close to launching in Canada, signing deals with many of the major labels, but for some reason that process was put on hold.

“No comment,” said Parks asked to confirm the speculation. “I’ll tell you this ... It takes time to get into markets like this, and to make sure you have done everything right. When we launched in Europe in 2008, we had been negotiating for the better part of a year and a half, when we launched it the U.S. in 2011, we had been negotiating for 18 months to two years.”

Music streaming still faces criticism for the relatively small payout that artists get from services — on its site, the company said it pays between $0.006 and $0.0084 for a single play of a track —Parks combats the negative publicity by saying that Spotify has paid over $1 billion (U.S.) to artists, and reportedly 70 per cent of its total revenues go to royalty payments.

The company’s argument is all about volume, in that as more people pay for subscription services, the payouts will get higher, and recent numbers show that streaming is growing. Last week, the Recording Industry Association of America reported first half numbers for the year, with U.S. revenue for streaming-music services rising 28 per cent to $859 million compared with $673 million in the same period last year. In that same period, digital download service revenues, like Apple’s iTunes, were down 12 per cent in the U.S. to $1.3 billion.

Those growth numbers include all types of streaming services. The market includes subscription players like Spotify, Rdio, Deezer and streaming radio services like Sirius XM, or free services like Songza and Pandora, or in Canada, CBC Music as well as on-demand services like YouTube and Vevo. It is a crowded market, and those in the industry argue that many consumers don’t yet fully understand the benefits of these services.

“Increasingly, the lines are getting blurry between theses companies, especially as the services have offered more free options. That has helped to build more awareness about what the benefits are,” says Russ Crupnick, managing partner, MusicWatch. “But, I still think for many of them there still needs some education to be done. I think the real challenge is how you get somebody to pay the first dollar.”

With illegal downloading and free competitors out there, Spotify, which also has a free, ad-supported version, charges $10 for its premium subscription product, like many of its competitors. Recently one analyst suggested that perhaps a lower rate, closer to $3-4 a month might be necessary for wider adoption of subscription services.

“Whether or not this is the right price point still remains to be seen,” says Parks.

“We think we have a great value proposition — all of the music in the world with you, anywhere on any device — for what it is really the price of couple of pints. At the same time, we do live in a world where there is infinite supply of music and where you can get it for free, be it radio, online or YouTube, or certainly, pirate sites.

But we want to make sure that we are pricing this in way that entices people away from those bad places, so whether that is $10 U.S. or Canadian is an open question.”

Submit News to CKA News John Tory offers a break from angry rhetoric: Keenan
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:30:00 EDT

At Monday afternoon’s arts-themed mayoral debate at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, the closing statements of the three leading candidates neatly summarized the state of the race.

Doug Ford used part of his final two minutes to congratulate himself and his opponents on their civility — an unprecedented outbreak of mutual respect and direct engagement with the arts industry questions at hand that had held for the entire debate up until that point.

As if to prove Ford wrong, Olivia Chow used her closing to say she’d done a bit of art herself in preparation for the debate, holding up a “cocktail napkin” on which she’d drawn John Tory’s SmartTrack transit plan, and — over the protestations of the moderator, who had successfully kept everyone on topic for two hours — proceeded to invite members of the public to use napkins to imagine the flying trains that would be needed to avoid tunnelling on Eglinton West if he implemented it.

When it was John Tory’s turn, he turned the topic to a pledge to unify the city. “There is a soul of the city that needs to be nurtured,” he said, hinting at the harsh divisions that have dominated city politics. He said the arts offer an opportunity to “bring the city together.”

There you have it, between the three of them: Ford being remarkable simply by making it through a single event without firing anti-elitist culture-war missiles at the front-runner; Chow demonstrating her increasingly desperate-seeming fixation on the potential engineering obstacles of a short stretch of Tory’s transit plan; and Tory seeming to win the day by promising to unify a divided city.

It seems to me that the recent polls have pointed to a specific and self-fulfilling conclusion: that John Tory is becoming a candidate drawing support from across the city because of the perception that he can draw support from across the city.

That bit of circular logic isn’t as empty as it might seem: in the past few years, the divisions that have dominated our politics, especially those between different regions of the city, have been among the most exhausting and frustrating parts of the circus at city hall.

In this, Tory has the luck of having a reputation as a person who can get along with people. When I began hosting open-line radio at Newstalk 1010 while John Tory was still the afternoon host at that station, listeners would call in and tell me that the big knock on him as a talk jock was that he was too agreeable — that he wanted to please everyone all the time. Yet Tory was a big ratings success for the station. What some vocal listeners saw as a big drawback was obviously a key to his success. And so it is in this mayoral campaign.

Which leaves his opponents, watching him build his lead, swinging at him wildly. Doug Ford relentlessly pointing out — yesterday’s class-war-ceasefire notwithstanding — what people already know: that Tory is a rich, well-connected guy from a family of rich, well-connected guys. Chow needling away at his transit plan’s construction and financing fuzziness, in hopes people might be convinced by these technical flaws that the whole idea and the candidate who put them forward is a fraud.

In both cases, so far, I think the attacks have fallen flat, because they don’t really tell us anything new, or address the core of Tory’s appeal: that he’s a guy who might give us a break from the angry rhetoric of geographic resentment and the bitter fights over the details of transit technology. It might turn out to be a mirage, but it’s the oasis of bland calm Tory promises.

There’s a lot of campaign left — it’s hard to imagine something significant won’t shake up the race in that time. But the city’s political trajectory these past four years has defied the most vivid imagination.

Tory’s opponents will need to employ their own imaginations more effectively to dream up a line of attack that will pierce the armour of growing inevitability. His ability to be the compromise guy may not set the heart soaring, but at this point in Toronto history, the very possibility of compromise feels to a lot of people like flight.

Edward Keenan writes on city issues ekeenan@thestar.ca . Follow: @thekeenanwire

Canadian Editorial/Opinion Newswatch

Warning: MagpieRSS: Failed to parse RSS file. (Undeclared entity error at line 56, column 54) in D:\Hosted Sites\canadaka.net\www\includes\rss_fetch\rss_fetch.inc on line 238 Submit News to CKA News John Baird suggests long mission ahead in Iraq
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 11:19:30 EDT

OTTAWA—As the federal cabinet considers sending fighter jets to Iraq, Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird suggests Canada and other countries could be in for a long mission.

Baird predicts that battling extremists in Iraq and elsewhere will take time and says Canada is in uncharted territory when it comes to directly engaging terrorist elements.

“Terrorism, radical extremism, this is the great struggle of our generation,” the minister said.

“Whether it’s in Iraq, whether it’s in Nigeria with Boko Haram, whether it’s with Al Shabab in Somalia . . . there’s no quick fixes.”

The federal cabinet is considering the possible deployment of CF-18 jets, along with surveillance aircraft, following an American request for Canada to become more involved in the ever-expanding air war against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

Baird says he won’t speculate on what decision he, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and their cabinet colleagues will reach.

But he told reporters in Ottawa on Tuesday that cabinet will play off recent military experiences in Libya and Afghanistan in deciding.

National Defence officials and critics question how long Canada could sustain such a combat mission, given the age of its fighter fleet and other commitments.

Canada already has four CF-18s flying air policing missions over the Baltic as part of NATO’s eastern European reassurance measures on behalf of Ukraine.

Following the Libya bombing campaign of 2011, there was concern in the air force that the CF-18 fleet was already being driven too hard, even with life-extension upgrades completed under the former Liberal government.

Submit News to CKA News Conservative government months late with jihadi tracking tool
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 10:42:28 EDT

OTTAWA?The Conservative government is three months late on delivering a tracking system it continues to tout as a means of stopping homegrown terrorists from joining overseas conflicts.

Under the Canada-U.S. perimeter security pact, the federal government pledged to begin collecting records as of last June 30 on people leaving Canada on international flights.

However, the Tories missed that deadline because legislative and regulatory changes are needed before the plan can take effect.

Canada Border Services Agency spokeswoman Esme Bailey would not reveal a new deadline for the project, saying only that information on proposed changes would be provided in due course.

In an interview broadcast last weekend, Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney said it was important to know when people leave the country and where they are going.

He said the government is working on tools, but made no reference to the missed deadline.

A recent federal report said the government knew of more than 130 individuals with Canadian connections who were abroad and suspected of supporting terror-related activities.

One Ontario man who died in combat in Syria last year had taken part in an elaborate video, widely circulated on the Internet following his death, with the aim of inspiring like-minded young people to wage jihad.

A border services briefing note says information from the new border tracking system could be provided to the RCMP and the Canadian Security Intelligence Service. ?This is of particular interest given the recent media attention on Canadians travelling abroad to engage in terrorist activities.?

For now, the system involves exchanging entry information collected from people at the Canada-U.S. land border ? so that data on entry to one country serves as a record of exit from the other.

The first two phases of the program have been limited to foreign nationals and permanent residents of Canada and the United States, but not citizens of either country.

The program was to be expanded by June 30, 2014, to include information sharing on all travellers crossing the land border.

In addition, Canada hoped to begin collecting information on people exiting by air ? something the United States already does ? by requiring airlines to submit passenger manifest data for outbound international flights.

In an emailed statement, Bailey said both Canada and the U.S. remain dedicated to full implementation of the initiative.

The U.S. Department of Homeland Security did not reply to questions about the next phase.

This week Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson is making his first visit to Canada in the job.

Civil libertarians and privacy advocates have expressed concerns about increased sharing of personal information about Canadians with U.S. security agencies.

Submit News to CKA News Maple Leaf Square will live on, MLSE says
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 08:01:15 EDT

Remember the hysteria last week over Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment’s plan to rename Maple Leaf Square after the Ford Motor Company?

Premature and unfounded, the MLSE says.

While a naming rights deal remains in place for the popular Bremner Blvd. gathering spot for Leafs and Raptors fans, MLSE will announce this morning that it will be branded the “Ford Fan Zone at Maple Leaf Square.”

The name accommodates Ford’s corporate branding while preserving the Maple Leaf name, and eliminates confusion over whether the city’s biggest sports and entertainment outfit had named some of its property after controversial Mayor Rob and mayoral candidate and Councillor Doug Ford.

When asked about renaming the meeting place “Ford Square,” marketing experts consulted by the Star last week weren’t impressed.

“You do get awareness but I can’t think of anyone who isn’t already aware that Ford exists and who they are,” wrote Queen’s University marketing professor Ken Wong in an email to the Star.

“If all they want is awareness, they could have it in spades if they gave a Ford vehicle to every charity in Toronto and they’d likely still have money left over versus what they pay to the Leafs.”

Maple Leaf Square’s popularity as a meeting place for fans took off during the Toronto Raptors playoff run last spring, when supporters would congregate outside Gate 5 of the Air Canada Centre and watch games on giant outdoor monitors.

Raptors fans gathered in such numbers and cheered with such ferocity that the square temporarily earned the nickname Jurassic Park.

MLSE and Ford will announce more details of the deal this afternoon.

Submit News to CKA News Hong Kong protesters threaten wider actions
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:59:33 EDT

HONG KONG—Pro-democracy protesters demanded that Hong Kong's top leader meet with them, threatening wider actions if he did not, after he said Tuesday that China would not budge in its decision to limit voting reforms in the Asian financial hub.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, who has taken a hard line against any perceived threat to the Communist Party's hold on power, meanwhile vowed in a National Day speech to “steadfastly safeguard” Hong Kong's prosperity and stability. He said Beijing believes Hong Kong will “create an even better future in the big family of the motherland.”

China's government has condemned the student-led protests as illegal, though so far it has not overtly intervened, leaving Hong Kong's semi-autonomous government to handle the crisis. But Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying's rejection of the student demands dashed hopes for a quick resolution of the five-day standoff that has blocked city streets, forcing some schools and offices to close.

Leung's statement drew a defiant response from the students.

“If Leung Chun-ying doesn't come out to Civic Square before midnight ... then I believe inevitably more people will come out onto the streets,” said Alex Chow, secretary general of the Hong Kong Federation of Students, the organizer of the university class boycotts that led to the street protests.

Chow said the students were considering various options, including widening the protests, pushing for a labour strike and possibly occupying a government building.

Despite the hardening rhetoric from both sides, the mood Tuesday night as the crowds of protesters swelled was festive. Few police were evident, and those who were appeared relaxed.

Both sides appeared to be waiting out the standoff, as police continued the light-handed approach to the protests they adopted after their use of tear gas and pepper spray over the weekend failed to drive out tens of thousands of people occupying streets near the government headquarters. The sit-ins instead spread to the financial district and other areas.

A brief cloudburst Tuesday cooled the air, seeming to energize the protesters, a group of whom shouted “Jiayou,” or “Keep it up,” and waved their cellphones with bright LED flashlights sparkling in the dark.

The crowd had plenty of umbrellas and rain capes on hand, having stockpiled them as a defence in case police might again deploy tear gas and pepper spray.

“We are not afraid of riot police, we are not afraid of tear gas, we are not afraid of pepper spray. We will not leave until Leung Chun-ying resigns. We will not give up, we will persevere until the end,” Lester Shum, another student leader, shouted to a crowd at Admiralty, near Hong Kong's waterfront.

Leung's blunt rejection of the demands from the students is not surprising. China's Communist leadership is wary of any conciliatory moves that might embolden dissidents and separatists on the mainland.

The protesters want a reversal of a decision by China's government in August that a pro-Beijing panel will screen all candidates in the territory's first direct elections, scheduled for 2017 — a move they view as reneging on a promise that the chief executive will be chosen through “universal suffrage.”

Occupy Central, a wider civil disobedience movement, said in a tweet that the deadline set by the pro-democracy protesters includes a demand for genuine democracy and for Leung's resignation. It said it would “announce new civil disobedience plans same day,” without elaborating.

China took control of Hong Kong from the British in 1997 under a “one country, two systems” arrangement that guaranteed the former British colony separate legal and economic systems and Western-style civil liberties.

Hong Kong's free press and social media give the protesters exposure that may help prevent China from cracking down in the same way it has on restive minorities and dissidents living in the mainland, where public dissent is often harshly punished.

“The people on the streets are here because we've made the decision ourselves and we will only leave when we have achieved something,” said Chloe Cheung, a 20-year-old student at the Hong Kong Institute of Education. “We are waiting for the government to respond to our demands for democracy and a say in what the elections will be like.”

With dozens of bus routes cancelled and some subway entrances near protest areas closed, Hong Kong's police and fire departments renewed their calls for the protesters to clear the streets.

The protests have been dubbed the “Umbrella Revolution” by some because the crowds have used umbrellas to block the sun and to deflect police pepper spray.

Many of the protesters were born after an agreement with Britain in 1984 that pledged to give China control of the city of 7 million, and have grown up in an era of affluence and stability, with no experience of past political turmoil in mainland China.

Their calls for a great say in their futures have widespread support among many in Hong Kong disillusioned by a widening gap between the city's ultra-wealthy tycoons and the rest of the population.

“I am committed to taking part in the protests as long as they remain peaceful,” said Peter Chin, a 22-year-old student at Hong Kong University.

“We are really basically just calling for the government to speak with us but they've been mute. We'll keep staying here until they're ready to consult with us,” he said.

Submit News to CKA News George Clooney and Amal Alamuddin get the People cover
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:44:44 EDT

What? I just bought a copy of People Magazine to see the pictures from the Brangelina wedding. And now it looks like I have to buy the magazine again to gawk at the Clooney/Alamuddin photos. Am I made of money?

This week's issue of People will have "25 exclusive photos of the emotional ceremony, star-studded parties and all the sweet candid moments" and, as was the case with the Brangelina photos, People and Hello have teamed up to buy the photos. We must assume the money will be given to charity. But, who knows ... perhaps the couple will spend the money on hamsters and high heels.

Amal wore Oscar de la Renta and George wore Armani and danced to Cole Porter's "Why Shouldn't I?"

The mother of the bride talked to the magazine: "George and Amal radiated love all night," Alamuddin's mother Baria tells People. "The wedding was so unbelievably special, it was legendary. These three days ? the friends, the families, the atmosphere, everything ? will stay with me all the rest of my life." One of four loved ones to deliver heartfelt speeches during the short ceremony, Baria, an editor at the Arabic newspaper Al-Hayat , addressed Clooney at one point. "I said, 'George, we love you truly, deeply and sincerely. We enjoy your charm, your wit, intelligent conversation and generosity. You are simply perfect.' " Awwww ...

George dad Nick said in his speech: "George and Amal present us with ... belief that in this place and at this moment, love is alive and well."



Submit News to CKA News John Tory offers a break from angry rhetoric: Keenan
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:30:00 EDT

At Monday afternoon’s arts-themed mayoral debate at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, the closing statements of the three leading candidates neatly summarized the state of the race.

Doug Ford used part of his final two minutes to congratulate himself and his opponents on their civility — an unprecedented outbreak of mutual respect and direct engagement with the arts industry questions at hand that had held for the entire debate up until that point.

As if to prove Ford wrong, Olivia Chow used her closing to say she’d done a bit of art herself in preparation for the debate, holding up a “cocktail napkin” on which she’d drawn John Tory’s SmartTrack transit plan, and — over the protestations of the moderator, who had successfully kept everyone on topic for two hours — proceeded to invite members of the public to use napkins to imagine the flying trains that would be needed to avoid tunnelling on Eglinton West if he implemented it.

When it was John Tory’s turn, he turned the topic to a pledge to unify the city. “There is a soul of the city that needs to be nurtured,” he said, hinting at the harsh divisions that have dominated city politics. He said the arts offer an opportunity to “bring the city together.”

There you have it, between the three of them: Ford being remarkable simply by making it through a single event without firing anti-elitist culture-war missiles at the front-runner; Chow demonstrating her increasingly desperate-seeming fixation on the potential engineering obstacles of a short stretch of Tory’s transit plan; and Tory seeming to win the day by promising to unify a divided city.

It seems to me that the recent polls have pointed to a specific and self-fulfilling conclusion: that John Tory is becoming a candidate drawing support from across the city because of the perception that he can draw support from across the city.

That bit of circular logic isn’t as empty as it might seem: in the past few years, the divisions that have dominated our politics, especially those between different regions of the city, have been among the most exhausting and frustrating parts of the circus at city hall.

In this, Tory has the luck of having a reputation as a person who can get along with people. When I began hosting open-line radio at Newstalk 1010 while John Tory was still the afternoon host at that station, listeners would call in and tell me that the big knock on him as a talk jock was that he was too agreeable — that he wanted to please everyone all the time. Yet Tory was a big ratings success for the station. What some vocal listeners saw as a big drawback was obviously a key to his success. And so it is in this mayoral campaign.

Which leaves his opponents, watching him build his lead, swinging at him wildly. Doug Ford relentlessly pointing out — yesterday’s class-war-ceasefire notwithstanding — what people already know: that Tory is a rich, well-connected guy from a family of rich, well-connected guys. Chow needling away at his transit plan’s construction and financing fuzziness, in hopes people might be convinced by these technical flaws that the whole idea and the candidate who put them forward is a fraud.

In both cases, so far, I think the attacks have fallen flat, because they don’t really tell us anything new, or address the core of Tory’s appeal: that he’s a guy who might give us a break from the angry rhetoric of geographic resentment and the bitter fights over the details of transit technology. It might turn out to be a mirage, but it’s the oasis of bland calm Tory promises.

There’s a lot of campaign left — it’s hard to imagine something significant won’t shake up the race in that time. But the city’s political trajectory these past four years has defied the most vivid imagination.

Tory’s opponents will need to employ their own imaginations more effectively to dream up a line of attack that will pierce the armour of growing inevitability. His ability to be the compromise guy may not set the heart soaring, but at this point in Toronto history, the very possibility of compromise feels to a lot of people like flight.

Edward Keenan writes on city issues ekeenan@thestar.ca . Follow: @thekeenanwire

Submit News to CKA News Streaming giant Spotify arrives in Canada
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:30:00 EDT

After months of bombarding music fans and technology enthusiasts with prelaunch invites, Spotify official enters the Canadian market on Tuesday.

Considered the global leader in music streaming with over 10 million subscribers in 58 countries worldwide, the company enters a market where some of their competitors, including Rdio and Deezer have been operating for years. That said, the company should benefit from curiosity and pent-up demand for a product that has long been available around the world.

“We spent a lot of time studying the market in Canada, and we know that Canada in terms of a music market is one of the most vibrant in the world, so we were really keen to treat this as not just another launch,” said Ken Parks, chief content and managing director, Spotify, in an interview last week. “We’re going to be launching with the most comprehensive Canadian music catalogue in the world.”

Parks cites deals with smaller local labels like Arts & Craft, Dine Alone, Nettwerk and several French-Canadian labels to appeal to the Francophone market. Signing those deals is one of the reasons the launch here was delayed, he said.

There was much speculation almost two years ago that Spotify was close to launching in Canada, signing deals with many of the major labels, but for some reason that process was put on hold.

“No comment,” said Parks asked to confirm the speculation. “I’ll tell you this ... It takes time to get into markets like this, and to make sure you have done everything right. When we launched in Europe in 2008, we had been negotiating for the better part of a year and a half, when we launched it the U.S. in 2011, we had been negotiating for 18 months to two years.”

Music streaming still faces criticism for the relatively small payout that artists get from services — on its site, the company said it pays between $0.006 and $0.0084 for a single play of a track —Parks combats the negative publicity by saying that Spotify has paid over $1 billion (U.S.) to artists, and reportedly 70 per cent of its total revenues go to royalty payments.

The company’s argument is all about volume, in that as more people pay for subscription services, the payouts will get higher, and recent numbers show that streaming is growing. Last week, the Recording Industry Association of America reported first half numbers for the year, with U.S. revenue for streaming-music services rising 28 per cent to $859 million compared with $673 million in the same period last year. In that same period, digital download service revenues, like Apple’s iTunes, were down 12 per cent in the U.S. to $1.3 billion.

Those growth numbers include all types of streaming services. The market includes subscription players like Spotify, Rdio, Deezer and streaming radio services like Sirius XM, or free services like Songza and Pandora, or in Canada, CBC Music as well as on-demand services like YouTube and Vevo. It is a crowded market, and those in the industry argue that many consumers don’t yet fully understand the benefits of these services.

“Increasingly, the lines are getting blurry between theses companies, especially as the services have offered more free options. That has helped to build more awareness about what the benefits are,” says Russ Crupnick, managing partner, MusicWatch. “But, I still think for many of them there still needs some education to be done. I think the real challenge is how you get somebody to pay the first dollar.”

With illegal downloading and free competitors out there, Spotify, which also has a free, ad-supported version, charges $10 for its premium subscription product, like many of its competitors. Recently one analyst suggested that perhaps a lower rate, closer to $3-4 a month might be necessary for wider adoption of subscription services.

“Whether or not this is the right price point still remains to be seen,” says Parks.

“We think we have a great value proposition — all of the music in the world with you, anywhere on any device — for what it is really the price of couple of pints. At the same time, we do live in a world where there is infinite supply of music and where you can get it for free, be it radio, online or YouTube, or certainly, pirate sites.

But we want to make sure that we are pricing this in way that entices people away from those bad places, so whether that is $10 U.S. or Canadian is an open question.”

Submit News to CKA News Experts warn against use of multi-dose vials in wake of hepatitis C outbreak at colonoscopy clinics
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

Vials of injectable medication meant for more than one patient pose an infection risk and should no longer be used, says a leading Ontario infection control expert.

“Don’t get me started on multi-dose vials. We should not be using multi-dose vials in this day and age,” said Dr. Allison McGeer, director of infectious disease control at Mount Sinai Hospital.

The Star reported on Saturday that 11 patients contracted hepatitis C during separate outbreaks at three Toronto colonoscopy clinics between 2011 and 2013.

Toronto Public Health said it is “possible” that use of multi-dose vials was the cause.

Multi-dose vials are small glass or plastic bottles that contain more than one dose of liquid medication. They are used in conjunction with needles and syringes.

A vial can become contaminated if the same syringe or needle is used for multiple patients.

Public Health Ontario, on its website, states that “unsafe injection practices” involving the vials can cause disease transmission. When a patient infected with hepatitis C is injected with medication, for example, backflow of traces of blood can contaminate the syringe.

When additional medication is then drawn from the vial and given to the same patient, the needle is often replaced, but the same syringe is used. The vial gets contaminated from the syringe, and the next patient to be injected with medication from it is then placed at risk.

MORE ON THIS STORY

Public not told of infection outbreak at private Toronto pain clinic

Hepatitis C outbreaks at three Toronto colonoscopy clinics kept secret

Infection outbreak at pain clinic sparks calls for greater transparency

The problem of health-care professionals inadvertently spreading infection has been underestimated, McGeer said.

“I think that it is only recently that we’ve started taking seriously the possibility that medical procedures are a potential risk for hepatitis, so most physicians, nurses, etc., think it doesn’t happen. But in truth, this has been happening on an ongoing basis. We need to be doing better to prevent it,” she warned.

According to TPH, three patients were infected with hepatitis C at the Downsview Endoscopy Clinic in 2011, three at the North Scarborough Endoscopy Clinic in 2012 and five at the Ontario Endoscopy Clinic in 2013.

Other places around the world have experienced outbreaks related to multi-use vials.

“You walk into any endoscopy unit or any pain clinic or any of the places where people use intravenous medication, and there will be deficiencies with multi-dose vials. I guarantee it. There is nobody who is using them properly. I hope we are finally going to move on it,” McGeer said.

The microbiologist, who said she has been on a “multi-dose-vial mission for 20 years,” noted the ampoules continue to be used in Ontario clinics, hospitals and outpatient offices. They are cheaper than single-dose vials and easier to store.

“We should be using single-dose vials of (injectable) medication, for the same reason that you have to have your foot on the brake when you put your car in gear, and you have ground-fault interrupters in bathroom electrical sockets, and you have railings on decks more than three feet above the ground, and there are automatic shut-off valves in car gas tanks so they don’t overflow,” she said.

“These are all examples of situations in which we force safety functions because we know that people are likely to make mistakes,” she continued.

Despite Garber’s assertion that the vials can be used safely, a Public Health Ontario committee steers clinicians away from using them. A best-practices guide from the Provincial Infectious Diseases Advisory Committee states: “Outbreaks associated with the use of multi-dose vials in outpatient settings are a frequent and a recurring problem. The use of multi-dose vials should be avoided whenever possible.”

But Dr. Gary Garber, medical director of infection prevention and control for Public Health Ontario, defended the use of the vials.

“Multi-dose vials can be used safely if the appropriate procedures are used,” he said, explaining, for example, that clinicians should wash their hands and never re-enter a vial with a used needle.

“If you want to look at the number of injections that go on every day in any given hospital or in any given city or health department, and then you look at the occasional infection that has happened, it is minuscule,” Garber said.

“From a patient safety perspective, minuscule is still important, but from that perspective you can see that, the overwhelming majority of times, the process is done correctly,” he added.

McGeer said the extent of the problem has not been tracked.

“Without good data on outbreaks and transmission, it has been very difficult for people to judge the size and risk, and most people’s judgment is that the cost of going to single-use vials is simply too great. I think that this is in part because we don’t have the data,” she said.

The outbreaks at the three colonoscopy clinics were not made public until reported in the Star. The authorities that investigate outbreaks and inspect clinics, Toronto Public Health and the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario, respectively, do not make outbreaks public.

Submit News to CKA News John Tory, Linda Jeffrey, Steve Mahoney lead in GTA polls
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

A trio of new election polls released Monday night show John Tory, Linda Jeffrey and Steve Mahoney leading the mayoral races in Toronto, Brampton and Mississauga, signalling a dramatic shakeup across the GTA, where the scandal-plagued Rob Ford and Susan Fennell and the soon-to-retire Hazel McCallion now govern.

The polls, completed by Forum Research, collected data on which candidates appear to be the front-runners in their races, but also examined attitudes towards Fennell following a recent forensic audit that revealed she and her staff broke spending rules 266 times in seven years.

The polls, conducted over the weekend and on Monday, show the race between Mahoney and fellow Mississauga mayoral candidate Bonnie Crombie is closest, with only four percentage points — a gap within the poll’s margin of error — separating the two.

The race’s third candidate, Stephen King, appears to be facing a defeat, with only 9 per cent of support in comparison with Mahoney’s 40 per cent and Crombie’s 36.

In August, the race had been much closer, with Mahoney leading Crombie by only one point.

The gap between leading candidates is much bigger in Brampton, where embattled mayor Susan Fennell is trailing former MPP Linda Jeffrey, who has garnered 42 per cent of support.

The poll showed that Fennell, with just 17 per cent of support among those surveyed, is facing additional fire from constituents who are looking for change after an audit showed Fennell and her staff misspent $172,000 and may have broken rules another 79 times, totalling $156,000 in expenses.

Though Fennell has repeatedly denounced the audit and said there was “no wrongdoing,” 55 per cent of respondents say they want her criminally charged and 63 per cent want her to resign. Twenty-eight per cent say they still approve of her.

In Toronto, where Mayor Rob Ford has bowed out of the race to be replaced by his brother Doug, Tory is leading the pack by 10 points.

The Forum poll shows Tory has 43 per cent of support, with Doug Ford and Olivia Chow earning 33 per cent and 20 per cent, respectively. Only 3 per cent said they would choose a fringe candidate.

The results follow the trajectory reported by Ipsos Reid on Friday. That poll placed Tory in the lead with 48 per cent of the vote. Chow and Ford followed behind with 26 per cent each. Twelve per cent of voters said they were still undecided.

That poll also found Tory had captured widespread support, while dominating in suburbs such as Etobicoke and Scarborough, where the Fords have historically found favour.

Submit News to CKA News Blitz finds nearly half of companies with interns break law
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

Nearly 42 per cent of businesses with internships were found to be breaking the law in a recent inspection blitz, according to Ontario Ministry of Labour documents obtained by the Star.

This spring, the ministry inspected 56 businesses in the GTA, issued 37 compliance orders and demanded the businesses pay $48,543 in back pay, the documents say.

The results of the “proactive enforcement blitz,” which took place between April 1 and June 15 of this year, will be made public Tuesday.

Ministry inspectors targeted companies in advertising, public relations, computer design and consulting, and found that of the 31 businesses which had interns, 13 were breaking the Employment Standards Act.

The most common violations were for not paying minimum wage or not providing vacation or public-holiday pay. Inspectors also found that businesses weren’t keeping proper records of their interns’ hours and remuneration.

Exploitation of unpaid interns has been growing across Canada, critics say, fuelled by outdated labour laws that don’t even include the word “intern.” Because the government keeps no statistics on internships there’s no certainty on the scope of the problem. Over the last year, however, several high-profile internship programs have been shut down.

Unpaid interns were fired from several national magazines after a previous inspection blitz. At least one of those magazines — The Walrus — later hired back their interns with pay.

MORE ON THESTAR.COM:

Unpaid internships: the most precarious work of all

Unpaid interns are this generation's slaves: Mallick

In defence of unpaid internships

“ ‘Internship’ is a term commonly used to describe a temporary work arrangement that involves a person working at a business in a beginner or junior position, who may or may not receive pay for that work,” writes Stephen McDonald, director of employment standards, in a letter summarizing the inspection results.

“Generally, if you perform work for another person or a company or other organization and you are not in business for yourself, you would be considered to be an employee, and therefore entitled to Employment Standards Act, 2000 (ESA) rights such as the minimum wage.

“There are some exceptions, but they are very limited, and the fact that you are called an intern is not relevant to whether your internship should be paid or unpaid. There are also exemptions for secondary school students in co-op work experience programs for credit or programs approved by a college of applied arts and technology or a university,” he wrote.

Of the 56 companies inspected, eight had no internship programs and 17 had no interns at the time of the inspection. Thirteen of the businesses ran internship programs that were exempt from the law, while five followed all regulations. The remaining 13 were found to be in breach of labour laws.

All of the companies found to be owing back wages to their interns paid voluntarily except one, for which the ministry issued an Order to Pay.

Submit News to CKA News How to find a toddler in a cornfield ? the search for little Brooklyn
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

Two-year-old Brooklyn Honderich loved to help her parents at their Jersey farm in Norwich, Ont. In videos posted on Facebook, she appeared to be totally at ease, scampering in khaki coveralls alongside rows of chocolate brown cows.

But Sunday evening just after 7 p.m., Brooklyn followed the family dog out of the barn and disappeared into a 150-acre cornfield. Just three feet tall, she would have been dwarfed by the mature cornstalks towering above her. No sooner had she entered the dense rows than they enveloped her.

With the sun rapidly setting, Brooklyn’s parents, Drew and Amy, called 911, setting in motion a well-oiled search and rescue process that would eventually mobilize more than 150 people, using dog teams, a helicopter and an aerial drone.

More at thestar.com

Ontario shortchanged on search-and-rescue helicopters

For more than 15 hours, searchers scoured the area wearing GPS units, their paths uploaded onto a digital search map. Yet it was a father-and-son pair of neighbours on a four-wheeler who found the little girl Monday morning. She was lying down not far from the roadside, crying but otherwise in good shape.

“We were just walking along the back cornfield and we were just calling her name,” the son, identified only as Steve, told CP24. “And I said to her — I called her name, and I wasn’t hearing anything, and I said, ‘Brooklyn, do you want to go to Mommy? Do you want to go to Mommy?’ And I just a heard a little girl crying and I just followed the noise and it took me right to her.”

Media swarmed the Honderichs’ farm, south of Woodstock, early Monday. A mobile command unit had been set up by the Ontario Provincial Police and a volunteer centre hastily established at the local arena to co-ordinate more than 60 locals who gathered to offer their help.

Brooklyn was taken to hospital as a precaution, but seemed to be in good health, an OPP spokesperson said Monday. Her family did not return calls or Facebook messages seeking comment.

The first officers on scene had arrived just before dusk Sunday and were quick to call in the Emergency Response Team, which carries out 300 to 400 searches per year across the province. For this one, they would co-ordinate a half-dozen fire, police and EMS services from as far away as Waterloo and London.

“Every situation is different, but they’re all handled the same way,” said Sgt. Jamie Stirling, the OPP’s provincial search and rescue co-ordinator.

Two canine units were deployed alongside search and rescue officers and trained and untrained volunteers. Starting from the point where the girl was last seen, they used foot speed and time missing to calculate how far Brooklyn could have gone. The search area extended beyond, but remained focused on, the cornfield.

“For anyone who’s ever been in a cornfield this time of year, it’s very hard to see even one row over during the daytime, so at night, you have to run searchers down each row of corn,” Stirling said.

The corn was so thick that when the OPP helicopter was deployed, its infrared imaging equipment had trouble getting any readings. The chopper spent between 90 minutes and two hours hovering over the field before it was forced to land and refuel.

Police dogs spent the night “boxing out” the search area, Stirling said, working around the edge of the field to make sure that Brooklyn hadn’t made it out and across the road into a different field.

Meanwhile, search and rescue officers worked their way up and down the cornrows all night alongside pre-selected volunteers who, like the army reserves, receive training in map and compass work as well as search techniques and are ready to respond when a situation arises.

Each searcher carries a portable GPS device and their precise paths are uploaded to a central map that allows the search master to ensure no areas are left uncovered. Walking up and down identical cornrows is tiring and repetitive work, and search teams were rotated frequently to stay sharp all night.

While the tall corn hindered the rescue effort, it also likely provided some shelter to Brooklyn from the dew and wind. The overnight temperature in Oxford-Brant County on Sunday dropped down to 11 degrees, according to Environment Canada, and while there hadn’t been any coyote sightings, they’re known to live in the area and could pose a threat to such a small person, said Brant County fire Chief Paul Boissonneault, who received an early morning call and dispatched firefighters to help as the sun was rising.

More than 11 hours had passed since he last saw his daughter when Brooklyn’s father, Drew, posted his first call-out to friends on Facebook: “Please pray for Brooklyn. She followed the dog into the cornfield last night. Police are searching with dogs and helicopters.”

Shortly afterward, he posted an article about the search, along with a photo of his daughters and details on how to join the rescue effort.

As the dew was evaporating, Boissonneault said between 70 and 100 firefighters had joined the 25 OPP officers involved in the rescue effort. Despite the difficult conditions, he was thankful that the recent weather had been so mild.

“Mother Nature was on our side. A week and a half ago, it got down to the low single digits overnight, but this past weekend was one of the best weekends we’ve had,” he said. “Mother Nature co-operated in that sense. It wasn’t rainy. It wasn’t cold. I would say that played a huge part in a positive outcome.”

By mid-morning, the OPP’s new unmanned aerial system, or drone, was dispatched from Orillia. It wouldn’t get airborne. While it was still en route, Brooklyn was discovered, at 10 a.m., between 600 and 1,000 metres from where she was last seen, Boissonneault said.

His deputy district chief, who was on hand to witness Brooklyn being reunited with her parents, said it was “very emotional situation.”

“Our minds often default to worst-case scenario, whereas this case was pure elation that we were able to connect a 2-year-old with their family,” he said.

Steve, who found the toddler, said her father came running over as soon as he saw her.

“It definitely makes you feel good,” he said. “In this community, we gather around each other. If it was my kid, I would expect the community to come out and help find my child, too.”

With files from Peter Edwards and Diana Hall

Submit News to CKA News Sun Media apologizes for Ezra Levant comments
Mon, 29 Sep 2014 20:33:58 EDT

OTTAWA—The Sun News network has apologized to Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau and declared that an “offensive” rant against his parents’ morality — which included a description of Pierre Trudeau as a “slut” — should have never made it to air.

Trudeau has accepted the apology and ended his boycott against Sun Media, which he launched in retaliation for the attack on his parents.

“We accept Sun News’ apology. We look forward to Sun News journalists resuming participation in Mr. Trudeau’s press conferences,” Trudeau’s office said in a statement after the apology aired.  

The apology did not come from the Sun TV performer, Ezra Levant, who made the slurs and subsequently wrote the same allegations in a column published in Sun newspapers.

Nor did the apology include any retraction of remarks presented as facts during the segment, particularly a Levant allegation that Trudeau, the son of morality-challenged parents, had forced himself into a wedding photo against the wishes of the family involved.

The family has categorically denied that version of events in subsequent reports, saying that they tried to tell Levant he was wrong in email messages — which he said he did not receive.

The Sun News apology came in the form of a text statement, read by an announcer — not Levant — just before his show, The Source, aired as usual on Monday night.

“In a monologue that aired Sept. 15, 2014, on The Source, host Ezra Levant criticized Justin Trudeau for ‘photo-bombing’ a bridal party. In this monologue he detailed a number of controversies involving Justin Trudeau’s parents and their marriage,” the statement said.

“It is the view of Sun News that this segment was in poor taste and should not have been aired. We understand why many viewers found both the content and language of this segment to be offensive. We apologize to Mr. Trudeau, his family and to our viewers.”

The lack of a personal apology and retraction from Levant, as well as the restrained reply from Trudeau — he has said only that he would welcome Sun News reporters’ participation in press conferences, with no guarantees of answering their questions — would appear to indicate only an awkward truce has been reached.

Trudeau’s boycott had stirred a controversy of its own, and questions about whether politicians should punish journalists as a whole for the actions of one columnist or editorial.

Trudeau has made no secret of his aversion to Sun News, which regularly ridicules him, and which his advisers allege is little more than an arm of the Conservative Party of Canada.

Submit News to CKA News CRTC walks away from Netflix confrontation
Mon, 29 Sep 2014 12:15:13 EDT

The federal telecom regulator may be backing away from a high-stakes fight with Netflix.

In a letter to the U.S.-based, web-streaming service on Monday, Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications’ secretary general John Traversy said the CRTC has “the powers of a superior court . . . to enforce its orders” and oblige Netflix to provide confidential business data.

But he said the regulator has decided to carry on without the information.

Traversy, however, said the CRTC would expunge on Oct. 2 all public record of Netflix’s participation in public hearings on the broadcasting system if it continues to refuse to relinquish closely held information. The CRTC will base any regulatory outcomes on the data available.

“It’s not the hill (the CRTC) wants to die on today,” said a source, who added that the regulator aims to avoid protracted litigation that may or may not assert its authority over Netflix and other unregulated content providers such as Google’s YouTube.

In pressing Netflix, the arm’s length regulator could also run contrary to wishes of the Prime Minister who has said he would not favour a “Netflix tax.”

The CRTC sent a letter to Google similar to the Netflix correspondence after Google showed reluctance when asked to provide data, citing competitive reasons. Google submitted additional information pursuant to a CRTC request, but it may not have been proprietary data.

During the final day of the Let’s Talk TV hearing, Netflix refused to hand over information on its subscribers in Canada and its spending on local programming, saying it needed absolute guarantees the data would be kept private.

The CRTC’s seeming unwillingness to take on Netflix and Google comes despite a warning Netflix’s exemption from regulation in Canada would be at risk if it failed to comply with the data request.

The letters were made public as the regulator commenced a week long hearing into the state of competition in the country’s wireless industry. The CRTC is examining the wholesale rates carriers charge to use each other’s networks, along with cellular tower sharing arrangements

Upstart carrier Wind Mobile told the hearing Monday that the rates are too high, even after Ottawa imposed an interim cap.

Toronto-based Wind said the rates should be below what incumbent carriers charge a retail customer, to reflect the lower cost of providing wholesale services.

Both Wind and fellow upstart Mobilicity said there is a need for regulatory intervention in roaming and site sharing, despite evidence changes have helped Wind better compete for new customers against the big three — Bell, Rogers and Telus.

Mobilicity argued that established companies have used their market power to discourage competition at the wholesale level, though the company believes the retail market is competitive.

Both Wind and Mobilicity said incumbents lack motivation to provide easy access to their infrastructure for rivals seeking to win market share.

The week-long CRTC hearting aims to determine if the wireless market is competitive and if further regulation is needed in the interest of consumers.

In an initial fact finding exercise the CRTC found what it called clear examples that certain wireless companies were subjecting smaller Canadian competitors to unjustly discriminatory rates and terms for roaming services.

The CRTC has responded by prohibiting exclusivity clauses from being included in roaming deals.

The CRTC panel will hear views on roaming and will also examine whether companies that do not have their own network infrastructure or spectrum should have access to certain wholesale wireless services at rates set by the commission.

It is to determine whether “greater regulatory oversight would be appropriate” and is widely expected to set a cap on wholesale rates lower than Ottawa’s interim measure.

Submit News to CKA News Canada?s wild digital frontier needs policing
Wed, 09 Feb 2011 03:08:26 Z
John Ivison: The copyright bill has a number of provisions that are far less favourable to Canada’s performers and creators, who are about to see take a big hit to their pocket-books
Submit News to CKA News Election buzz, stale rhetoric ? Parliament has deja vu all over again
Tue, 01 Feb 2011 11:42:28 Z
John Ivison: If you missed Question Period Monday, don’t worry — you have a golden opportunity to miss it again Tuesday
Submit News to CKA News Death of Personal Responsibility: Think outside the lunchbox
Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:50:39 Z
Neil Seeman: So what should the role of the state be in combating obesity? It’s time to think outside of the lunchbox, and try a whole new idea: healthy living vouchers, or HLVs
Submit News to CKA News Don?t give Quebec a nickel
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:57:55 Z
Jonathan Kay: If Harper says no to the Bloc's demands, he will be going to the voters as a man of principle who stood his ground on a subject far more important to this country than corporate tax rates
Submit News to CKA News Stelmach more than a victim of changing attitudes
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:38:13 Z
Kevin Libin: Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach bet the fortune of his party’s unparalleled political dynasty on a leadership strategy that failed to pan out
Submit News to CKA News Dave Taylor a mixed blessing for fledgling Alberta Party
Tue, 25 Jan 2011 02:34:30 Z
Kevin Libin: The addition of former Liberal MLA Dave Taylor to the Alberta party gives it a legitimacy boost, but does the outspoken former radio personality fit with the party's post-partisan dreams?
Submit News to CKA News Playing by China's rules
Sun, 23 Jan 2011 19:21:17 Z
Rex Murphy: China has reached an agreement with the Newfoundland government to begin the importation of seal and seal products into its potentially vast market. This is both very good and rare news for Newfoundland sealers
Submit News to CKA News Canada: Nanny AND wimpy state?
Thu, 20 Jan 2011 20:08:14 Z
Before, there actually had to be a violent protest before public institutions caved in and cancelled controversial events. Now, a group of unhinged zealots make a couple of angry phone calls and – poof! – they silence free speech and free assembly
Submit News to CKA News Executives probably not swayed by Liberal tax plan
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 23:54:00 Z
Scott Stinson: It’s a safe bet that Mr. Ignatieff did not win many converts with his tax-increase sales pitch to Canadian executives on Tuesday. This is not a great surprise
Submit News to CKA News Conservatives missed the call for more civilized debate
Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:58:11 Z
Kelly McParland: The federal Conservatives’ brain trust must have been somewhere else when President Barack Obama delivered his speech in Arizona last week, calling for greater civility in political debate.
Submit News to CKA News Harper's five years: Canadians better off, even if they don't feel it
Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:21:36 Z
John Ivison: Jan. 23 marks the fifth anniversary of Stephen Harper’s 2006 election victory and in early February, he will pass Lester B. Pearson’s time in office to become Canada’s 11th longest-serving Prime Minister

Sources:

If you have a suggestions for additional news sources to be added to the CKA Canada Newswatch, please contact us.