Canada Newswatch

The CKA Canada Newswatch is a companion to our in-house Canada News system.
The Newswatch is a collection of various Canadian news feeds in one convenient location.


CKA members can use the Canada newswatch to promote stories from the newswatch to the CKA News Links.

Click the Submit News-link to CKA News button to quickly submit news.

Daily Canada Newswatch

Submit News to CKA News Ian Mulgrew: A fight to keep the violent at bay
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:03:14 Z
Ian Mulgew: A fight to keep the violent at bay
Submit News to CKA News Analysis: Liberals' aviation fuel tax hike will hurt Ontarians, say critics
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:01:13 -0400

Finance Minister Charles Sousa's 148% hike in the tax on aviation fuel has been largely flying under the radar since his May budget and the June election.
Submit News to CKA News Canada sending 69 ?advisers? to Iraq: Isn?t that a combat operation that requires Parliament?s approval?
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 13:00:32 +0000
The NDP and Liberals fear Canada?s advise-and-assist mission with Iraqi forces and Kurdish fighters could turn into combat, much as a 'peacekeeping deployment' to Kandahar did in 2006
Submit News to CKA News BC teachers' strike: BCTF recommends accepting 6-year deal - CBC.ca
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:56:36 GMT

National Post

BC teachers' strike: BCTF recommends accepting 6-year deal
CBC.ca
The B.C. Teachers' Federation is recommending its members accept the tentative six-year deal which B.C. Premier Christy Clark is calling "historic." A deal of that length has never been reached with teachers before in the province. "We have ? reached an ...
'I hope that all parties will be winners,' says former BC Education MinisterThe Globe and Mail
A new peace? Longest deal in decades could end lengthiest B.C. teachers' strikeCanada.com
Teachers' tentative deal brings reliefNorth Shore News
Times Colonist -YorkRegion.com
all 296 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Tories changed tack on Supreme Court appointment after Globe report - The Globe and Mail
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:46:36 GMT

Globalnews.ca

Tories changed tack on Supreme Court appointment after Globe report
The Globe and Mail
The federal government says it abandoned its normal process when it named Justice Clément Gascon to the Supreme Court in June because it was worried about leaks to The Globe and Mail detailing the flawed selection process used to choose the last ...
Harper sidestepped MPs on Supreme Court pick due to Nadon 'leaks'CBC.ca

all 5 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Emergency debate on ISIL draws only a handful of MPs
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:35:53 Z
Fewer than two dozen MPs were on hand Tuesday evening for the start of an "emergency" debate on how Canada should respond to the threat posed by the terror group Islamic State (ISIL).
Submit News to CKA News Authorities looking for missing High River woman - CTV News
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:32:50 GMT

CTV News

Authorities looking for missing High River woman
CTV News
High River RCMP is searching for a missing woman who hasn't been seen since Monday afternoon. Cathrina Robideau, 39, left her home on Monday afternoon. She was last seen in the Homestead Acres Trailer Park in the northeast quadrant of High River.
Mounties looking for missing High River woman660 News
High River RCMP seeks public help locating missing personHigh River Times

all 7 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Liberal support climbs in all measures of Nanos power index - CTV News
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:30:42 GMT

CTV News

Liberal support climbs in all measures of Nanos power index
CTV News
The federal Liberals are riding a wave of popularity, according to a new Nanos poll, with the party showing gains in B.C., Quebec and among Canadians over 60 years of age. According to results of the weekly Nanos Party Power Index, 58.5 per cent of ...
Raising the minimum wage: Citizens express anguish over working povertyMuse
Delicate politics mark Tom Mulcair's minimum-wage gambit: WalkomOurWindsor.ca
Must-see QP: Why the NDP can't win on the minimum wageMacleans.ca

all 9 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Liberal support climbs in all measures of Nanos power index
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 08:30:00 -0400
The federal Liberals are riding a wave of popularity, according to a new Nanos poll which shows gains for the party in B.C., Quebec and among Canadians over 60 years of age.
Submit News to CKA News Missing: B.C. woman whose car was vandalized in Stanley Cup riot
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 08:22:00 -0400
The family of an Abbotsford, B.C. woman who disappeared more than a week ago is asking for the public's help in locating her.
Submit News to CKA News Don?t fear the FIPA
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:17:22 +0000

Excitable nationalists and their wild imaginings about the Canada-China foreign-investment deal have lead to all manner of silly arguments

The post Don’t fear the FIPA appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Ville Marie Tunnel declared safe after concrete smashes windshield - Montreal Gazette
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:13:24 GMT

CTV News

Ville Marie Tunnel declared safe after concrete smashes windshield
Montreal Gazette
MONTREAL ? Transport Quebec inspectors gave the all-clear after a chunk of concrete smashed the windshield of a small truck travelling through the Ville Marie Tunnel on Tuesday night. The driver was in the Duke St. tunnel heading east when the chunk of ...
Car damaged by concrete falling from Ville Marie tunnelCTV News
Falling concrete in Ville-Marie tunnel smashes windshieldCBC.ca

all 4 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Good things gro-o-owing in Ontario, economists say
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 12:00:02 +0000

Your top financial and economic news for Sept. 17

The post Good things gro-o-owing in Ontario, economists say appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Teen suspended after selling non-diet pop from his locker
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:57:00 -0400
The entrepreneurial skills of an Alberta teenager are making headlines after he was suspended for selling non-diet pop out of his school locker.
Submit News to CKA News Ex-Archbishop of Montreal seriously ill in hospital - Sun News Network
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:51:46 GMT

Sun News Network

Ex-Archbishop of Montreal seriously ill in hospital
Sun News Network
Cardinal Jean-Claude Turcotte, who was archbishop of Montreal for more than two decades, is gravely ill in hospital. Turcotte, 78, has been experiencing "serious" health problems "for some time," the archdiocese of Montreal said in a statement. In a message ...
Montreal Cardinal, Jean-Claude Turcotte, Seriously Ill in HospitalOye! Times
Montreal Cardinal Turcotte in palliative careRegina Leader-Post
Former Montreal Cardinal Turcotte in hospitalSurrey Leader

all 16 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Vikings reverse Peterson decision, bar him from team
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:51:00 EDT

MINNEAPOLIS—After a day of public pressure from angry fans and concerned sponsors, the Minnesota Vikings have reversed course and placed star running back Adrian Peterson on the exempt-commissioner’s permission list, a move that will require him to stay away from the team while he addresses child abuse charges in Texas.

The Vikings made the announcement early Wednesday morning, about a day and a half after initially deciding that Peterson could play with the team while the legal process played out. Peterson is charged with a felony for using a wooden switch to spank his 4-year-old son and now could miss the rest of the season while the case proceeds through the court system.

The Vikings came under heavy criticism for their initial stance. Several sponsors responded by either suspending their deals with the Vikings or severing ties with Peterson, prompting Vikings owners Zygi and Mark Wilf to revisit the situation on Tuesday.

“While we were trying to make a balanced decision yesterday, after further reflection we have concluded that this resolution is best for the Vikings and for Adrian,” the Wilfs said in a statement.

“We want to be clear: we have a strong stance regarding the protection and welfare of children, and we want to be sure we get this right. At the same time we want to express our support for Adrian and acknowledge his seven-plus years of outstanding commitment to this organization and this community.”

Peterson was indicted last week in Montgomery County, Texas, after admitting to authorities that he struck his son with a tree branch. Peterson said he was disciplining his son the same way his own father disciplined him while growing up in Palestine, Texas, and didn’t intend to hurt him.

The Vikings deactivated him for the 30-7 loss to the New England Patriots on Sunday while they gathered more information. But on Monday they announced that Peterson was being reinstated and expected to play this weekend at New Orleans.

The about face came after the Radisson hotel chains suspended its sponsorship with the Vikings, Papa John’s considered doing the same, and Anheuser-Busch said it was “disappointed and increasingly concerned” with the negative attention brought to the league by Ray Rice’s assault on his wife and Peterson’s arrest.

Castrol Motor Oil, Special Olympics Minnesota and Mylan Inc. all severed ties with Peterson, and Twin Cities Nike stores pulled Peterson’s jerseys from its shelves.

“This is the best possible outcome given the circumstances,” Peterson’s agent, Ben Dogra, told The Associated Press of the Vikings’ decision. “Adrian understands the gravity of the situation and this enables him to take care of his personal situation.

“We fully support Adrian and he looks forward to watching his teammates and coaches being successful during his absence.”

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton, who spearheaded an effort to secure $477 million in public money to help build the team a new stadium, and Sen. Al Franken were among the many who called for the Vikings to reconsider their position.

Peterson’s first court appearance isn’t until Oct. 8, and with the Vikings specifying that he must stay away “until the legal proceedings are resolved,” it appears there is a possibility that he won’t play again this year.

The Vikings said they had deliberations with the NFL over the previous two days and informed the league they were revisiting the situation. Executives were at the team’s Winter Park headquarters late into the night on Tuesday, discussing how to respond to the avalanche of criticism.

“After giving the situation additional thought, we have decided this is the appropriate course of action for the organization and for Adrian,” the Wilfs said in their statement. “We are always focused on trying to make the right decision as an organization.

“We embrace our role — and the responsibilities that go with it — as a leader in the community, as a business partner and as an organization that can build bridges with our fans and positively impact this great region. We appreciate and value the input we have received from our fans, our partners and the community.”

What this means for Peterson’s future with the team remains to be seen. The 29-year-old has been the face of the franchise practically since he was drafted in 2007, one of the most popular and marketable stars in the NFL whose All Day Foundation charity is devoted to helping children.

But the foundation’s website was shuttered on Tuesday, at one point posting a message that it “will re-engage after Adrian, his family, and staff have reflected on how the current situation impacts the direction for Adrian’s philanthropy.”

Peterson has rushed for 10,190 yards and 86 touchdowns in his NFL career. He won the MVP award in 2012 after rushing for 2,097 yards in his return from a torn ACL.

“We will support Adrian during this legal and personal process, but we firmly believe and realize this is the right decision,” the Wilfs said. “We hope that all of our fans can respect the process that we have gone through to reach this final decision.”

Submit News to CKA News Rob Ford and family brace for hard times ahead - Toronto Sun
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:45:52 GMT

Toronto Sun

Rob Ford and family brace for hard times ahead
Toronto Sun
ford Mayor Rob Ford's brother, Doug, is pictured as he arrived Tuesday at Mt. Sinai Hospital in Toronto. (ERNEST DOROSZUK, Toronto Sun). Article. Tweet. Change text size for the story; Print this story. Report an error ...
Update expected today on Toronto Mayor Rob Ford's tumourHamilton Spectator
TORONTO VOTES: Top mayoral candidates Tory, Ford and Chow offer transit ...insideTORONTO.com
Rob Ford's health: Update expected todayCBC.ca
Toronto Star -640 Toronto News
all 276 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Ukraine's Poroshenko to address Canadian Parliament, meet PM
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:39:00 -0400
Though it just got back to business, the House of Commons will take a bit of a break today to welcome the arrival of Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, who will address Parliament this afternoon.
Submit News to CKA News Tempers flare at emergency debate on Canadian deployment to Iraq
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:34:27 -0400

Tempers flared during an emergency debate in the House of Commons Tuesday night as the opposition demanded answers about Canada's mission in Iraq.
Submit News to CKA News Reviled King Richard III died painfully on the battlefield, study suggests
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:34:00 -0400
England's King Richard III might well have lost his kingdom for a horse. The reviled king suffered nearly a dozen injuries on the battlefield, but the fatal blows were probably only sustained after he had to abandon his horse, according to a new paper.
Submit News to CKA News New mother?s donation to mom with leukemia a potentially life-saving gift
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 11:11:48 Z
MONTREAL — Mai Duong wept as she spoke of the anonymous new mother who has recently donated the umbilical cord that just may generate the stem cells required to cure Duong’s leukemia. “A mom is saving another mom’s life and that’s huge,” Duong told reporters at a news conference at Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont Tuesday.
Submit News to CKA News In Quebec, the Scottish referendum is driving sovereigntists wild with envy - National Post
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:36:04 GMT

Telegraph.co.uk

In Quebec, the Scottish referendum is driving sovereigntists wild with envy
National Post
Twenty years ago, after driving out of Inverness airport, I spontaneously turned right down a charming-looking Scottish country lane marked ?Castle Stuart.? At the end of the track stood a 300 year-old turreted beauty. A sign on the lawn read: ?Bed & Breakfast.
Elizabeth the last queen of Scotland? Not so fast.Christian Science Monitor
Scottish-Canadians watching referendum vote closelyNewstalk 1010
Quebec nationalists flock to Scotland in hope of witnessing separatist historyTelegraph.co.uk
The Independent -Washington Post
all 71 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Mystery object over the Rockies was Russian spy satellite: experts
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:29:00 -0400
People from New Mexico to Montana saw the bright object break apart as it moved slowly northward across the night sky. Witnesses described it as three 'rocks' with glowing red and orange streaks.
Submit News to CKA News Dalton McGuinty registers as government lobbyist - Newstalk 1010
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:27:36 GMT

Ottawa Citizen

Dalton McGuinty registers as government lobbyist
Newstalk 1010
Former Ontario Liberal Premier Dalton McGuinty is returning to Queen's Park, not as a politician but as a lobbyist. He has registered as a lobbyist for the Kitchener-based software company Desire2Learn. It makes educational software called Brightspace, ...
Former Premier McGuinty Registers to Lobby Queen's ParkOye! Times
Dalton McGuinty, Ex-Ontario Premier, Registers As Government LobbyistHuffington Post Canada
Former premier Dalton McGuinty to lobby Queen's ParkThe Globe and Mail
Waterloo Record
all 9 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News U.S. man arrested for allegedly trying to swim from South to North Korea
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:16:00 -0400
South Korean border guards arrested an American man who they believe was attempting to swim across a river to rival North Korea, a South Korean defence official said Wednesday.
Submit News to CKA News Vikings ban Peterson from team activities while addressing charges
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:09:00 -0400
After a day of public pressure from angry fans and concerned sponsors, the Minnesota Vikings have reversed course and placed star running back Adrian Peterson on the exempt-commissioner's permission list, a move that will require him to stay away from the team while he addresses child abuse charges in Texas.
Submit News to CKA News A rough guide to Scotland
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 10:00:31 +0000

What you need to know as the historic vote nears.

The post A rough guide to Scotland appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News It?s like a train on your wedding day ? newlyweds? photo shoot derailed
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

It starts off like a dream — a late summer day, a lush backdrop and a picturesque trestle bridge, where a bride and groom are posing for what will surely be memorable wedding photos, surrounded by friends and family.

Then, a foreboding sound pierces the idyll — chug-a-chug-a-chug-a — followed by the sobering realization that this ain’t the love train coming round the bend.

Another, more alarming sound — choo-choo! — and now the bride and groom are retreating as fast as formal footwear will allow.

On Saturday, near Orangeville, that scenario played out when an approaching passenger train put the brakes on a newlywed couple’s photo shoot. The train’s lumbering speed prevented the story from having a tragic ending, but the crew didn’t take the incident lightly. The wedding dashers made their exit before police could arrive.

More at thestar.com

Brides are saying ‘I do’ to trashing the dress

Morning after wedding photos can be tasteful yet sensual

Video: How to ruin a wedding

Around 3:15 p.m., the unidentified wedding party was posing for photos on a trestle bridge along the rail line between Orangeville and Brampton. The Credit Valley Explorer, a sightseeing train, was approaching the bridge at the same moment. The bridge is 350 metres long and 26 metres high at its tallest point — and does not feature an obvious escape route.

The party’s reaction to the appearance of the train was captured by Mike Davis, a local magazine publisher who was riding in the observation car. The tiny figures look like the boys in Stand by Me, if Vern and Gordie were wearing high heels.

Happily, they didn’t need to run. The Explorer moves at a crawl, the better for passengers to take in Caledon’s bucolic countryside, so it was able to stop before trundling onto the bridge.

“We were going over the bridge slowly so people could look at the vista,” said Steve Gallagher, manager of operations for the Orangeville Brampton Railway. “We had the train under control and we were able to bring it to a controlled stop.”

The freight trains that sometimes use that stretch of track, shuttling cargo between Orangeville and Brampton, might not have been able to stop so quickly, Gallagher said.

But as it was, the matrimonial party walked to safety at a leisurely pace. “There wasn’t any sort of panic that I saw,” said Davis. “They looked like they were sort of walking slowly.”

Mind you, it’s hard to run on train tracks when you’re wearing heels — with luck, these will be the last spikes to ply those rails.

When the group had cleared the bridge, they repaired to a white stretch limousine parked on an adjacent road. Members of the train crew confronted them there, and asked that the party stay and talk to police. The group declined.

“We called the police, and when we asked (the party) to stay until the police came, they left,” said Gallagher. “Understandably, our crew was very upset with the whole situation. You don’t want to see anyone get harmed or hurt.”

Freelance journalist Phil Gravelle, who was also aboard the train, said he saw “the wedding party guys kind of waving their arms around.”

He added, “It was obviously an animated exchange.”

Ontario Provincial Police later arrived at the scene, but did not respond to multiple requests for comment about whether they were pursuing the matter.

“No trespassing” signs line the tracks, Gallagher said.

Submit News to CKA News Supreme Court ruling hasn?t stopped police from warrantless requests for data
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

OTTAWA—Law enforcement agencies are still making warrantless requests for telecom customers’ personal data months after a Supreme Court ruling appeared to shut down the practice.

Police in Canada used to ask telecom companies to voluntarily hand over data on Canadian customers more than a million times per year. In June, the Supreme Court struck down this warrantless method as an invasion of privacy.

But while the number of warrantless requests has dropped since the decision, they have not stopped, an investigation by the Star and the Halifax Chronicle Herald has found. Key players, including the country’s largest police force and a major telecom, aren’t saying whether they still send or accept them.

Another of Canada’s “big three” telecoms, Rogers, started demanding warrants for all requests after the June ruling, known as the Spencer decision. Even after this policy change, the company continues to receive warrantless requests, according to Ken Engelhart, vice-president of regulatory affairs at Rogers.

Engelhart said the warrantless requests are only a “handful” compared to the approximately 90,000 the company fielded in 2013. But he also said that overall police requests are being made nearly as frequently as before the Spencer decision.

“People now understand that we don’t give it warrantless . . . so we’re getting a handful,” Engelhart said in an interview last week. “But we’re still getting the kind of requests we used to get without a warrant, but now they’re accompanied by a warrant.”

Warrantless requests are generally made for “basic subscriber information.” This data — such as a customer’s name, address, Internet protocol address, or telephone number — that can be used to construct a telling profile when tied to someone’s online activity.

TELUS confirmed in a statement that they also require a warrant to access such data in all but the most extreme circumstances. The company did not disclose, however, if it is still receiving warrantless requests.

The last of Canada’s “big three” telecoms, Bell, has repeatedly refused interview requests on the issue. In a one-line statement last week, the company would say only that it complies with Canadian law.

There does not seem to be consensus on whether the Supreme Court decision should apply to almost all requests.

“(The decision) specifically did not create a requirement for law enforcement to obtain judicial authorization for any and all basic subscriber information from a telecommunications service provider,” Sgt. Greg Cox, a spokesman for the RCMP, wrote in an email.

Cox wrote that the RCMP will continue to request data without a warrant in the case of emergencies — which the Supreme Court allowed — but would not clarify whether they will do so in other cases.

Federal agencies have not made up their minds on how broadly the ruling should apply. The government is still reviewing the decision “with a view to establishing a common interpretation,” according to the Canada Border Services Agency.

The debate seems to be whether the decision applies to all warrantless data requests, or only in the specific set of circumstances that were before the Supreme Court in the Spencer case.

That case centred on Matthew David Spencer, a Saskatchewan man who was charged with accessing child pornography. Police tracked him down after Shaw Communications gave them the name and address attached to Spencer’s IP address. No warrant was involved.

The top court unanimously ruled that police should not request customer information without a warrant. But Spencer’s conviction was upheld because the Supreme Court justices found police had acted in good faith at the time.

The lawyer who argued Spencer’s case said he has no doubt that the decision was clearly meant to apply very broadly.

“The fact that this was a child pornography case was almost irrelevant to the decision. The question was, ‘(Is) judicial authorization required before you could access that information?’ ” said Aaron Fox, of Saskatchewan-based McDougall Gauley LLP.

Customers are not informed when their data has been shared and most never find out unless it shows up as evidence in a court case.

“That’s the frightening part about this. They could be accessing your Internet information right now. If you’re not charged with anything . . . you’ll never know,” said Fox.

While Rogers no longer entertains warrantless requests, Engelhart said it’s up to police to judge whether trying to obtain information without a warrant could jeopardize their case.

“They need to analyze it to determine whether they are going to lose any convictions in court . . . but frankly that doesn’t affect us. We’ve decided that we won’t be providing this information without a warrant,” Engelhart said.

Submit News to CKA News Toronto public school trustees racked up high costs for conference travel
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

Toronto public school trustees spent $108,000 on conferences over a three-year period, travelling to California, Boston and Whistler on the taxpayers’ dime, say two confidential reports obtained by the Star.

The biggest spenders were trustees Gerri Gershon, racking up $13,804.54 in conference costs; Elizabeth Moyer, with at least $13,727.53; and Shelley Laskin with more than $13,533.93, from 2010-11 to 2012-13, the reports show. There were no cost estimates available for three additional conferences attended by Moyer and Laskin.

These figures come as Toronto trustees face a barrage of criticism over their spending habits. As revealed by the Star, a separate internal audit, obtained through a freedom of information request, showed trustees were reimbursed for hand lotion, a floor mat, $11.30 worth of chocolate bars, a $205 aerial tour of the Alberta oilsands, and Gershon’s tour of Israel, which cost nearly $4,000.

More at thestar.com

Editorial: Voters must take Toronto District School Board mess seriously

“Taxpayers have been rightfully upset to learn about past trustee expenses at the TDSB,” said board chair Mari Rutka in a letter to the editor sent to the Star on Tuesday. She added that trustees and education director Donna Quan had asked for the internal audit to identify the problems.

“And, since and because of that report, we have made the changes needed to make sure future expenses are fully compliant with a new and much tougher expense policy, which came into effect in May of this year,” Rutka wrote.

“While I believe that some expenses — not all — were submitted with the best of intentions and that reasonable explanations for those expenses may exist, in the end, I also acknowledge the fact that some expenses were not appropriate and should not have been expensed — let alone approved.”

The confidential reports — which consist of two charts — compile, for the first time, figures from different funds that trustees can use to charge for conference travel.

In total, the 22 Toronto District School Board trustees spent a at least $108,000 on conference travel during the three school years in question. That figure includes Gershon’s controversial $3,765 tour of Israel, which she said was meant to promote interfaith relations after concerns were raised about Muslim prayers at one of her schools.

Three trustees filed no conference expenses during the time period — Stephnie Payne, Chris Tonks and Irene Atkinson — while others filed claims ranging from a few hundred dollars to several thousand.

Laskin told the Star in an interview that she received permission for all conferences she attended and that, overall, she is one of the lowest spenders when it comes to expenses.

Trustees each have a $27,000 expense budget, but can also claim conference costs from other pots of money.

“Professional development is one of the tenets of being a trustee,” Laskin said, adding that several initiatives have come out of her travels.

This is not the first time Toronto public school board trustees have landed in hot water over food expenses or over-mileage — several reports over the years have cited inappropriate spending.

“I think generally with school boards and all levels of government, the end goal is transparency,” said Toronto Catholic board trustee John Del Grande, who was one of the first trustees in the province to post his expenses online, receipts and all, in 2006. All trustees in the Toronto Catholic board now do so.

“As an outsider and from a school board that was the first to openly post expenses online, I’m disappointed that our coterminous board wouldn’t follow suit with that . . . My advice to the public board is to just openly post, and things have a way of working themselves out,” said Del Grande.

While some professional development is warranted for elected officials, trustees must always be sure “they are being prudent in terms of travel and accommodations,” said Del Grande, who is not running for re-election.

That sentiment was echoed by former Toronto board chair Chris Bolton, who said some trustees did attend conferences without prior approval and even went to the U.S. when there was a ban on international travel. Few ever produced reports on what they learned, he said.

“There is a role for professional development, but there are two things we need to remember: we shouldn’t be doing those things during times of austerity … and the other thing that we talked about (as trustees) was that when somebody goes to a conference, they should be reporting back,” Bolton said.

Toronto public trustees voted last week to post expenses online, but in general categories only and not with receipts.

“The reality is, if you are not comfortable with your expenses being on the front page of the Sun or the Star, you need to question what you are doing,” said Del Grande. “Expenses aren’t bad, but they need to be reasonable and there needs to be a clear set of rules and guidelines.”

Unused money set aside for trustee expenses can be returned to general coffers. The Toronto Catholic board votes, as a whole, to decide where the leftover money will be spent.

Gershon said she emailed 700 people when she took her 2011 trip to Israel “and told them about its purpose and what I planned to do as a result.” No one complained, she said.

However, the internal audit found it was unclear how such a trip was relevant to her trustee duties. Gerson said she “did not operate outside of our policy” or go beyond her spending limit.

As for her high conference claims, she said, “I have a passion for what I do and I always want to improve.”

Moyer wrote in an email: “All TDSB trustees have access to a discretionary fund and I choose to use it for professional development. It is important to stay current on education issues in my role. All (professional development) is associated with my role as trustee.”

Submit News to CKA News Video: Doctors to deliver an update on Rob Ford?s health today
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:51:45 +0000

Toronto has speculated about mayor's condition ever since he dropped out of mayoral race

The post Video: Doctors to deliver an update on Rob Ford’s health today appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Surrey Mounties investigate suspicious death in Cloverdale
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:36:43 Z
Surrey Mounties are investigating a "suspicious death" of a "younger person" in Cloverdale Tuesday night. RCMP were called around 7 p.m. after a body was found on the 14600 block of 66th Avenue, acoording to a Surrey RCMP news release.Officers arrived and confirmed the death, but the exact cause of the person's suspicious death is still unknown, the release stated.The victim's identity has not yet been confirmed either the release stated.
Submit News to CKA News Three B.C. enterovirus cases now confirmed, authorities say
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:36:37 Z
A severe respiratory illness that is sweeping across North America has reached B.C. as three people in the province are now confirmed to have been hit by enterovirus D68, say staff at the B.C. Centre for Disease Control. The cases come on the heels of confirmation by Canada’s public health agency of 18 more cases of the illness in Alberta. Danuta Skowronski, the lead on emerging respiratory viruses with the BCCDC, said that because the illness is spread through the respiratory route, it was only a matter of time before it entered the province.
Submit News to CKA News Review: Acoustic titans Thile and Meyer launch Chan Centre concert season
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 09:36:28 Z
The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts at UBC is easily the finest venue in the city for acoustics.At the launch of the venue's 2014-15 concert season Tuesday night, the room hosted two giants of contemporary acoustic music - MacArthur Fellowship Genius Grants recipients mandolinist Chris Thile and double bassist Edgar Meyer.After the opening number it was obvious why the honours have been bestowed on the two musicians.
Submit News to CKA News Iker and Clark on What Deal Means: A Study in Contrasts (in News)
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:40:00Z
Agreement contains 'meaningful achievements' says BCTF union head.
Submit News to CKA News Inquest into Mexican's Death Will Hear from Cellmates, Private Guards (in News)
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:30:00Z
Probe into Lucía Vega Jiménez's hanging at Vancouver airport last winter starts Sept. 29.
Submit News to CKA News Please Advise! Baggage Fees Are No Joke (in Opinion)
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:20:00Z
Spinmeister Steve Burgess helps WestJet safely land its latest luggage policy.
Submit News to CKA News Glasgow Games: How a Sports Spectacle Might Undo the UK (in Opinion)
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:10:00Z
For Thursday's Scottish referendum, the opening act came this summer.
Submit News to CKA News The Charbonneau commission was an expensive disappointment
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 03:00:00 -0400
Quebec got three years of must-watch TV, but too many trails were left unfollowed
Submit News to CKA News Union turns up the heat on firefighters who volunteer on days off
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 03:00:00 -0400
Tom Hunse is fighting to keep his job as firefighter union bylaws in Ontario prohibit members from working at a volunteer force on their days off
Submit News to CKA News 2015 is the Harper election
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 03:00:00 -0400
What will be next year?s ballot issue? The Prime Minister?s own polarizing presence
Submit News to CKA News Ismaili Centre: place of prayer, cradle of friendship
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 03:00:00 -0400
An inauguration in Toronto reflects architectural accomplishment, but also dialogue and human rapport
Submit News to CKA News B.C. Lions owner Braley entertaining "several offers" for club
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:36:13 Z
TORONTO — David Braley has people kicking the tires of both Canadian Football League franchises he hopes to sell, but says his top priority is securing his Eastern team a lease at BMO Field. The Toronto Argonauts and B.C. Lions have been for sale since last September when the 73-year-old Hamilton businessman stated he’d sell one or both by his 75th birthday. Braley said Tuesday he has several potential suitors for the Lions but refuted a Toronto Star headline stating he had “multiple offers” for the Argos.
Submit News to CKA News Rob Ford and family brace for hard times ahead
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 01:25:37 -0400

Very soon the world will know the status of Mayor Rob Ford's health and what doctors plan to do about it.
Submit News to CKA News Amazing Race Canada recap: No fun in New Brunswick
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 05:10:33 +0000

The challenges on this leg of the race left something to be desired. But the episode's bittersweet end was worth the wait.

The post Amazing Race Canada recap: No fun in New Brunswick appeared first on Macleans.ca.

Submit News to CKA News Paramedics rush to 'accidental' shooting of boy, 6
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 01:03:56 -0400

Paramedics say a six-year-old boy was shot and seriously hurt Tuesday afternoon.
Submit News to CKA News First Nation to open 'Museum of Canadian Human Rights Violations'
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 01:01:38 -0400

With the Canadian Museum for Human Rights in Winnipeg set to open its doors to the public this Friday, the people of Shoal Lake 40 First Nation have decided to open a museum of their own: the Museum of Canadian Human Rights Violations.
Submit News to CKA News Blatchford: Jamila Bibi deserves a better life in this big, empty country
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 04:40:30 Z
When I saw the Saskatoon StarPhoenix picture of a weeping Jamila Bibi on Tuesday, I thought of only one thing, and that is, how Canada looks from the air. I’ve flown across this country probably more than the average bear, […]
Submit News to CKA News Train carrying sulphuric acid derails east of Slave Lake, Alta.
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 00:28:11 -0400
Two of the derailed cars were carrying sulphuric chloride while one was carrying sulphuric acid
Submit News to CKA News Homicide investigators probe man?s death at Burnaby highrise (updated)
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 03:36:07 Z
The Integrated Homicide Investigation Team spent Tuesday at a Burnaby highrise where a man was killed the night before. IHIT Staff Sgt. Jennifer Pound said details of the victim, including his name, would not be released until Wednesday.

Canadian Editorial/Opinion Newswatch

Warning: MagpieRSS: Failed to parse RSS file. (Undeclared entity error at line 56, column 54) in D:\Hosted Sites\canadaka.net\www\includes\rss_fetch\rss_fetch.inc on line 238 Submit News to CKA News Vikings reverse Peterson decision, bar him from team
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 07:51:00 EDT

MINNEAPOLIS—After a day of public pressure from angry fans and concerned sponsors, the Minnesota Vikings have reversed course and placed star running back Adrian Peterson on the exempt-commissioner’s permission list, a move that will require him to stay away from the team while he addresses child abuse charges in Texas.

The Vikings made the announcement early Wednesday morning, about a day and a half after initially deciding that Peterson could play with the team while the legal process played out. Peterson is charged with a felony for using a wooden switch to spank his 4-year-old son and now could miss the rest of the season while the case proceeds through the court system.

The Vikings came under heavy criticism for their initial stance. Several sponsors responded by either suspending their deals with the Vikings or severing ties with Peterson, prompting Vikings owners Zygi and Mark Wilf to revisit the situation on Tuesday.

“While we were trying to make a balanced decision yesterday, after further reflection we have concluded that this resolution is best for the Vikings and for Adrian,” the Wilfs said in a statement.

“We want to be clear: we have a strong stance regarding the protection and welfare of children, and we want to be sure we get this right. At the same time we want to express our support for Adrian and acknowledge his seven-plus years of outstanding commitment to this organization and this community.”

Peterson was indicted last week in Montgomery County, Texas, after admitting to authorities that he struck his son with a tree branch. Peterson said he was disciplining his son the same way his own father disciplined him while growing up in Palestine, Texas, and didn’t intend to hurt him.

The Vikings deactivated him for the 30-7 loss to the New England Patriots on Sunday while they gathered more information. But on Monday they announced that Peterson was being reinstated and expected to play this weekend at New Orleans.

The about face came after the Radisson hotel chains suspended its sponsorship with the Vikings, Papa John’s considered doing the same, and Anheuser-Busch said it was “disappointed and increasingly concerned” with the negative attention brought to the league by Ray Rice’s assault on his wife and Peterson’s arrest.

Castrol Motor Oil, Special Olympics Minnesota and Mylan Inc. all severed ties with Peterson, and Twin Cities Nike stores pulled Peterson’s jerseys from its shelves.

“This is the best possible outcome given the circumstances,” Peterson’s agent, Ben Dogra, told The Associated Press of the Vikings’ decision. “Adrian understands the gravity of the situation and this enables him to take care of his personal situation.

“We fully support Adrian and he looks forward to watching his teammates and coaches being successful during his absence.”

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton, who spearheaded an effort to secure $477 million in public money to help build the team a new stadium, and Sen. Al Franken were among the many who called for the Vikings to reconsider their position.

Peterson’s first court appearance isn’t until Oct. 8, and with the Vikings specifying that he must stay away “until the legal proceedings are resolved,” it appears there is a possibility that he won’t play again this year.

The Vikings said they had deliberations with the NFL over the previous two days and informed the league they were revisiting the situation. Executives were at the team’s Winter Park headquarters late into the night on Tuesday, discussing how to respond to the avalanche of criticism.

“After giving the situation additional thought, we have decided this is the appropriate course of action for the organization and for Adrian,” the Wilfs said in their statement. “We are always focused on trying to make the right decision as an organization.

“We embrace our role — and the responsibilities that go with it — as a leader in the community, as a business partner and as an organization that can build bridges with our fans and positively impact this great region. We appreciate and value the input we have received from our fans, our partners and the community.”

What this means for Peterson’s future with the team remains to be seen. The 29-year-old has been the face of the franchise practically since he was drafted in 2007, one of the most popular and marketable stars in the NFL whose All Day Foundation charity is devoted to helping children.

But the foundation’s website was shuttered on Tuesday, at one point posting a message that it “will re-engage after Adrian, his family, and staff have reflected on how the current situation impacts the direction for Adrian’s philanthropy.”

Peterson has rushed for 10,190 yards and 86 touchdowns in his NFL career. He won the MVP award in 2012 after rushing for 2,097 yards in his return from a torn ACL.

“We will support Adrian during this legal and personal process, but we firmly believe and realize this is the right decision,” the Wilfs said. “We hope that all of our fans can respect the process that we have gone through to reach this final decision.”

Submit News to CKA News It?s like a train on your wedding day ? newlyweds? photo shoot derailed
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

It starts off like a dream — a late summer day, a lush backdrop and a picturesque trestle bridge, where a bride and groom are posing for what will surely be memorable wedding photos, surrounded by friends and family.

Then, a foreboding sound pierces the idyll — chug-a-chug-a-chug-a — followed by the sobering realization that this ain’t the love train coming round the bend.

Another, more alarming sound — choo-choo! — and now the bride and groom are retreating as fast as formal footwear will allow.

On Saturday, near Orangeville, that scenario played out when an approaching passenger train put the brakes on a newlywed couple’s photo shoot. The train’s lumbering speed prevented the story from having a tragic ending, but the crew didn’t take the incident lightly. The wedding dashers made their exit before police could arrive.

More at thestar.com

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Around 3:15 p.m., the unidentified wedding party was posing for photos on a trestle bridge along the rail line between Orangeville and Brampton. The Credit Valley Explorer, a sightseeing train, was approaching the bridge at the same moment. The bridge is 350 metres long and 26 metres high at its tallest point — and does not feature an obvious escape route.

The party’s reaction to the appearance of the train was captured by Mike Davis, a local magazine publisher who was riding in the observation car. The tiny figures look like the boys in Stand by Me, if Vern and Gordie were wearing high heels.

Happily, they didn’t need to run. The Explorer moves at a crawl, the better for passengers to take in Caledon’s bucolic countryside, so it was able to stop before trundling onto the bridge.

“We were going over the bridge slowly so people could look at the vista,” said Steve Gallagher, manager of operations for the Orangeville Brampton Railway. “We had the train under control and we were able to bring it to a controlled stop.”

The freight trains that sometimes use that stretch of track, shuttling cargo between Orangeville and Brampton, might not have been able to stop so quickly, Gallagher said.

But as it was, the matrimonial party walked to safety at a leisurely pace. “There wasn’t any sort of panic that I saw,” said Davis. “They looked like they were sort of walking slowly.”

Mind you, it’s hard to run on train tracks when you’re wearing heels — with luck, these will be the last spikes to ply those rails.

When the group had cleared the bridge, they repaired to a white stretch limousine parked on an adjacent road. Members of the train crew confronted them there, and asked that the party stay and talk to police. The group declined.

“We called the police, and when we asked (the party) to stay until the police came, they left,” said Gallagher. “Understandably, our crew was very upset with the whole situation. You don’t want to see anyone get harmed or hurt.”

Freelance journalist Phil Gravelle, who was also aboard the train, said he saw “the wedding party guys kind of waving their arms around.”

He added, “It was obviously an animated exchange.”

Ontario Provincial Police later arrived at the scene, but did not respond to multiple requests for comment about whether they were pursuing the matter.

“No trespassing” signs line the tracks, Gallagher said.

Submit News to CKA News Supreme Court ruling hasn?t stopped police from warrantless requests for data
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

OTTAWA—Law enforcement agencies are still making warrantless requests for telecom customers’ personal data months after a Supreme Court ruling appeared to shut down the practice.

Police in Canada used to ask telecom companies to voluntarily hand over data on Canadian customers more than a million times per year. In June, the Supreme Court struck down this warrantless method as an invasion of privacy.

But while the number of warrantless requests has dropped since the decision, they have not stopped, an investigation by the Star and the Halifax Chronicle Herald has found. Key players, including the country’s largest police force and a major telecom, aren’t saying whether they still send or accept them.

Another of Canada’s “big three” telecoms, Rogers, started demanding warrants for all requests after the June ruling, known as the Spencer decision. Even after this policy change, the company continues to receive warrantless requests, according to Ken Engelhart, vice-president of regulatory affairs at Rogers.

Engelhart said the warrantless requests are only a “handful” compared to the approximately 90,000 the company fielded in 2013. But he also said that overall police requests are being made nearly as frequently as before the Spencer decision.

“People now understand that we don’t give it warrantless . . . so we’re getting a handful,” Engelhart said in an interview last week. “But we’re still getting the kind of requests we used to get without a warrant, but now they’re accompanied by a warrant.”

Warrantless requests are generally made for “basic subscriber information.” This data — such as a customer’s name, address, Internet protocol address, or telephone number — that can be used to construct a telling profile when tied to someone’s online activity.

TELUS confirmed in a statement that they also require a warrant to access such data in all but the most extreme circumstances. The company did not disclose, however, if it is still receiving warrantless requests.

The last of Canada’s “big three” telecoms, Bell, has repeatedly refused interview requests on the issue. In a one-line statement last week, the company would say only that it complies with Canadian law.

There does not seem to be consensus on whether the Supreme Court decision should apply to almost all requests.

“(The decision) specifically did not create a requirement for law enforcement to obtain judicial authorization for any and all basic subscriber information from a telecommunications service provider,” Sgt. Greg Cox, a spokesman for the RCMP, wrote in an email.

Cox wrote that the RCMP will continue to request data without a warrant in the case of emergencies — which the Supreme Court allowed — but would not clarify whether they will do so in other cases.

Federal agencies have not made up their minds on how broadly the ruling should apply. The government is still reviewing the decision “with a view to establishing a common interpretation,” according to the Canada Border Services Agency.

The debate seems to be whether the decision applies to all warrantless data requests, or only in the specific set of circumstances that were before the Supreme Court in the Spencer case.

That case centred on Matthew David Spencer, a Saskatchewan man who was charged with accessing child pornography. Police tracked him down after Shaw Communications gave them the name and address attached to Spencer’s IP address. No warrant was involved.

The top court unanimously ruled that police should not request customer information without a warrant. But Spencer’s conviction was upheld because the Supreme Court justices found police had acted in good faith at the time.

The lawyer who argued Spencer’s case said he has no doubt that the decision was clearly meant to apply very broadly.

“The fact that this was a child pornography case was almost irrelevant to the decision. The question was, ‘(Is) judicial authorization required before you could access that information?’ ” said Aaron Fox, of Saskatchewan-based McDougall Gauley LLP.

Customers are not informed when their data has been shared and most never find out unless it shows up as evidence in a court case.

“That’s the frightening part about this. They could be accessing your Internet information right now. If you’re not charged with anything . . . you’ll never know,” said Fox.

While Rogers no longer entertains warrantless requests, Engelhart said it’s up to police to judge whether trying to obtain information without a warrant could jeopardize their case.

“They need to analyze it to determine whether they are going to lose any convictions in court . . . but frankly that doesn’t affect us. We’ve decided that we won’t be providing this information without a warrant,” Engelhart said.

Submit News to CKA News Toronto public school trustees racked up high costs for conference travel
Wed, 17 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

Toronto public school trustees spent $108,000 on conferences over a three-year period, travelling to California, Boston and Whistler on the taxpayers’ dime, say two confidential reports obtained by the Star.

The biggest spenders were trustees Gerri Gershon, racking up $13,804.54 in conference costs; Elizabeth Moyer, with at least $13,727.53; and Shelley Laskin with more than $13,533.93, from 2010-11 to 2012-13, the reports show. There were no cost estimates available for three additional conferences attended by Moyer and Laskin.

These figures come as Toronto trustees face a barrage of criticism over their spending habits. As revealed by the Star, a separate internal audit, obtained through a freedom of information request, showed trustees were reimbursed for hand lotion, a floor mat, $11.30 worth of chocolate bars, a $205 aerial tour of the Alberta oilsands, and Gershon’s tour of Israel, which cost nearly $4,000.

More at thestar.com

Editorial: Voters must take Toronto District School Board mess seriously

“Taxpayers have been rightfully upset to learn about past trustee expenses at the TDSB,” said board chair Mari Rutka in a letter to the editor sent to the Star on Tuesday. She added that trustees and education director Donna Quan had asked for the internal audit to identify the problems.

“And, since and because of that report, we have made the changes needed to make sure future expenses are fully compliant with a new and much tougher expense policy, which came into effect in May of this year,” Rutka wrote.

“While I believe that some expenses — not all — were submitted with the best of intentions and that reasonable explanations for those expenses may exist, in the end, I also acknowledge the fact that some expenses were not appropriate and should not have been expensed — let alone approved.”

The confidential reports — which consist of two charts — compile, for the first time, figures from different funds that trustees can use to charge for conference travel.

In total, the 22 Toronto District School Board trustees spent a at least $108,000 on conference travel during the three school years in question. That figure includes Gershon’s controversial $3,765 tour of Israel, which she said was meant to promote interfaith relations after concerns were raised about Muslim prayers at one of her schools.

Three trustees filed no conference expenses during the time period — Stephnie Payne, Chris Tonks and Irene Atkinson — while others filed claims ranging from a few hundred dollars to several thousand.

Laskin told the Star in an interview that she received permission for all conferences she attended and that, overall, she is one of the lowest spenders when it comes to expenses.

Trustees each have a $27,000 expense budget, but can also claim conference costs from other pots of money.

“Professional development is one of the tenets of being a trustee,” Laskin said, adding that several initiatives have come out of her travels.

This is not the first time Toronto public school board trustees have landed in hot water over food expenses or over-mileage — several reports over the years have cited inappropriate spending.

“I think generally with school boards and all levels of government, the end goal is transparency,” said Toronto Catholic board trustee John Del Grande, who was one of the first trustees in the province to post his expenses online, receipts and all, in 2006. All trustees in the Toronto Catholic board now do so.

“As an outsider and from a school board that was the first to openly post expenses online, I’m disappointed that our coterminous board wouldn’t follow suit with that . . . My advice to the public board is to just openly post, and things have a way of working themselves out,” said Del Grande.

While some professional development is warranted for elected officials, trustees must always be sure “they are being prudent in terms of travel and accommodations,” said Del Grande, who is not running for re-election.

That sentiment was echoed by former Toronto board chair Chris Bolton, who said some trustees did attend conferences without prior approval and even went to the U.S. when there was a ban on international travel. Few ever produced reports on what they learned, he said.

“There is a role for professional development, but there are two things we need to remember: we shouldn’t be doing those things during times of austerity … and the other thing that we talked about (as trustees) was that when somebody goes to a conference, they should be reporting back,” Bolton said.

Toronto public trustees voted last week to post expenses online, but in general categories only and not with receipts.

“The reality is, if you are not comfortable with your expenses being on the front page of the Sun or the Star, you need to question what you are doing,” said Del Grande. “Expenses aren’t bad, but they need to be reasonable and there needs to be a clear set of rules and guidelines.”

Unused money set aside for trustee expenses can be returned to general coffers. The Toronto Catholic board votes, as a whole, to decide where the leftover money will be spent.

Gershon said she emailed 700 people when she took her 2011 trip to Israel “and told them about its purpose and what I planned to do as a result.” No one complained, she said.

However, the internal audit found it was unclear how such a trip was relevant to her trustee duties. Gerson said she “did not operate outside of our policy” or go beyond her spending limit.

As for her high conference claims, she said, “I have a passion for what I do and I always want to improve.”

Moyer wrote in an email: “All TDSB trustees have access to a discretionary fund and I choose to use it for professional development. It is important to stay current on education issues in my role. All (professional development) is associated with my role as trustee.”

Submit News to CKA News No charges for York officer in fatal motorcycle crash
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 23:00:37 EDT

Ontario’s police watchdog has decided there are no grounds to charge a York Regional Police officer in connection with a fatal collision that left a 28-year-old motorcyclist dead in June.

The Special Investigations Unit (SIU) released a statement Tuesday concluding that factors like low lighting, view-obstructing construction work in the area and the motorcycle’s speed could have contributed to the crash with a police cruiser on June 14.

Results from the forensic investigation and 11 witness statements led the SIU to conclude the police officer did not commit a crime that led to the collision.

The watchdog’s director, Tony Loparco, said the officer was travelling eastbound on Queensville Side Rd., north of Newmarket, and attempted to make a U-turn when the motorcycle slammed into the cruiser from behind at about 11:15 p.m.

“The forensic reconstruction of the events around the collision put the motorcycle’s speed at about 148 to 154 km/h just before it left a skid mark in a failed effort to avoid striking the cruiser,” Loparco said.

At that speed, the SIU determined the police officer would not have seen the motorcyclist upon checking to make sure the coast was clear to make his turn.

The SIU is a civilian agency that investigates incidents involving police in the event of a death, serious injury, or allegations of sexual assault.

Submit News to CKA News Ontario man alleged to be jihadist advocating Islamic State violence
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 22:26:00 EDT

The world of Twitter is alleging a GTA man is a jihadist with a predilection for social media missives that champion terrorism, acts of torture and violence in Syria.

Messages on a Twitter page belonging to a user by the name of Abu Turaab condone atrocities including the recent beheading of 40-year-old American journalist James Foley by the Islamic State terrorist group.

The National Post identified the man behind the tweets as 23-year-old Mohammed Ali, a former Mississauga resident who left the country in April for Turkey and then crossed into northern Syria.

The Twitter user, believed to be the first person in the GTA to be publicly linked to the Islamic State, did not respond to a Tuesday tweet from a Star reporter requesting comment and confirmation of his identity.

A spokesperson for Steven Blaney, Canada’s federal minister of public safety and emergency preparedness, refused to comment on whether the man is known to police or being investigated.

“We don’t comment on operational matters of national security,” spokesman Jason Tamming told the Star in an email. “We will continue protecting law-abiding Canadian families from those who would seek to do them harm.”

Using an acronym for the Islamic State group in a hashtag, the Twitter user posted recently “Roses are red, Violets are blue, #IS is coming, To a town near you.”

As early as Aug. 15, he began using an account with a cat profile picture to quote Allah, make references to Islamic State, post photos of armed men and AK-74 rifles and taunt American authorities.

In one message, the Twitter user taunts the military: “Everyone knows the U.S army is made up of criminals and high-school dropouts with no future so they join to avoid flipping burgers at McDees.”

The man’s current whereabouts are unknown. He is not included on the Specially Designated Nationals List compiled by the U.S. Department of the Treasury for the purpose of tracking individuals and companies blocked from the U.S.

In February, Michel Coulombe, director of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, said there are about 130 Canadians fighting alongside extremist groups around the world. Thirty of them were said to be in Syria and many are believed to hold dual citizenship.

Submit News to CKA News Ebola crisis in West Africa: U.S., Canada, world finally responding
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:33:03 EDT

Recent days have seen a significant increase in the world’s lagging response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa: China and Cuba are sending doctors, the World Bank approved a $105-million grant, and the United States pledged 3,000 troops, 1,700 new Ebola beds and training for hundreds of health care workers.

This is all good news, said Montreal physician Joanne Liu, but developed countries, including Canada, are still doing too little too late.

The recently announced contributions are “absolutely not enough,” said Liu, who acts as international president for the medical charity Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF). “If we want to be ahead of the game and reverse the current (trend) over the next three months, we need to deploy 20 times more than what we have in the field today.

“What they are offering is not 20 times what we have in the field. But it’s a start.”

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MSF has been vocal in criticizing the developed world for its sluggish response to the Ebola epidemic, which is nearing 2,500 deaths and 5,000 reported cases, according to the World Health Organization’s latest update.

Nearly half of all cases have occurred in the past three weeks alone. Most of those are in Liberia, where new infections are now rising “exponentially,” according to the WHO.

According to a modelling study published last week by the journal Eurosurveillance, the world could see another 277,000 Ebola cases by year-end if the worst-case scenario comes to pass.

In late June, MSF warned the outbreak was already “out of control” but the WHO did not declare a public health emergency until more than a month later and only now do Western nations seem to be awakening to the severity of the crisis.

On Tuesday, U.S. senators attending a joint committee hearing did not mince words as they called for a “war on Ebola” and described the virus as a threat as serious as the Islamic States terrorists.

President Barack Obama also announced a massive scale-up of the U.S. response to the crisis with the deployment of 3,000 troops to West Africa. They will be stationed at an intermediate base in Senegal and across Liberia but will not provide direct care to Ebola patients, according to Obama’s press secretary Josh Earnest.

The U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps is also sending 65 health workers to a 25-bed hospital in the Liberian capital, Monrovia, a move announced earlier this week by the Pentagon. But that hospital, according to reports, will be used only for treating international health workers who fall sick.

Obama announced several other significant contributions on Tuesday, including the establishment of a military command centre in Liberia and 17 new health care facilities designed for 100 patients each. U.S. personnel will also provide training for up to 500 health workers per week and distribute hundreds of thousands of “home health care kits.”

“This massive ramp-up of support from the United States is precisely the kind of transformational change we need to get a grip on the outbreak and begin to turn it around,” WHO director-general Margaret Chan said in an emailed statement.

Liu, however, would like to see more countries sending people instead of just money and supplies. She hopes the latest U.S. announcements will have a “domino effect” and motivate other countries to put boots on the ground.

MSF currently has 2,000 staff in West Africa, managing more than 530 beds at five treatment centres, but the organization is still being overwhelmed, with sick people banging on its doors in Monrovia only to be turned away for lack of space.

“This is a biological threat, and I find it completely unacceptable and ridiculous that the know-how is in the hands of a private international NGO,” Liu said.

To date, Canada has contributed $5.2 million towards the emergency response, including a $2.5-million donation of personal protective equipment announced on Monday.

The Public Health Agency of Canada has also maintained a small presence in eastern Sierra Leone, where rotating teams of scientists from its Winnipeg lab have been performing diagnostic tests on Ebola patients.

The delivery of between 800 and 1,000 doses of experimental vaccine donated by the PHAC is still pending, however. The health agency is currently working with the WHO to sort out the logistics of delivering the doses, a spokesperson said Tuesday.

Canada should be doing far more, according to Liu. She questions, for example, why the Canadian government managed to deploy its disaster assistance response team (DART) within 24 hours of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti but six months after the Ebola outbreak began in Guinea, no Canadian teams have been mobilized for West Africa.

“If (MSF) can give 530 beds and have 2,000 staff in the region, I don’t see why a big state like Canada cannot do more,” she said.

A spokesperson with the Department of Foreign Affairs, in an email sent the Star late Tuesday said there are currently no plans to send Canadian Armed Forces to Ebola-affected countries.

Amy Mills also noted that DART is deployed for “large-scale, rapid-onset natural disasters” at the request of affected countries and provides “primary (not quarantine/isolation) medical care” in addition to water purification and military engineering.

For Dr. David Heymann, who has worked on past Ebola outbreaks and headed the WHO’s response to SARS in 2003, the contributions being made by the U.S. are “very generous” and he is glad to see other countries starting to come on board with offers of help.

But it’s too early to say whether this marks a turning point, he said.

“I don’t think anybody can tell anyone where the gaps are right now,” said Heymann, now head of global health security for British-based policy think tank Chatham House.

“I’m encouraged that more partners are now participating but there needs to be an understanding of what’s really needed so that the right support can go in.”

With files from Star wire services

Submit News to CKA News Bad tenant granted bail after arrest in North York
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 20:24:25 EDT

Adam Buttigieg was granted bail on Tuesday afternoon, a day after he was taken into custody at a North York courthouse because he failed to obey conditions set out by police following a previous arrest.

Buttigieg, a tenant who habitually fails to pay rent and whose story is part of a Star series into how some tenants exploit protections at the Landlord and Tenant Board to stay in properties rent free, left without speaking to the Star. He sprinted from the courthouse to avoid being photographed.

Buttigieg, according to his bail conditions, must reside at the address where police have been told they can reach him. His mother, who acted as surety and posted $1,000 bail, declined to comment.

Police constables had taken him into custody at a North York courthouse on Monday morning because he failed to comply with undertaking, or following rules set out by police after he was arrested in May for allegedly stealing from and defrauding his former fiancée.

A detective constable wanted to ask him questions about those charges, but was unable to reach him by phone and told the Star he wasn’t confident the address Buttigieg had provided to police was in fact where he was living.

His next appearance is scheduled for Oct. 15.

Submit News to CKA News Rob Ford's health status to be revealed by doctor Wednesday
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 19:41:00 EDT

After days of ominous but cryptic comments from Mayor Rob Ford and members of his family, a doctor will give the city an official update Wednesday on the health problems that have cast a pall over the mayoral election.

The uncertainty surrounding Ford’s status has slowed a campaign that usually accelerates in September. New candidate Doug Ford stayed off the campaign trail again on Tuesday, appearing downcast and emotional when he spoke briefly to reporters outside Mount Sinai Hospital.

“It’s extremely tough right now,” he said.

Rob Ford gave another disquieting interview to the Toronto Sun’s Joe Warmington. He said Monday that he had undergone a second biopsy, this one on his lungs, and was vomiting and in pain.

“It’s pretty tricky right now,” he said.

Nobody from the Ford family will attend the doctor’s 5 p.m. news conference on Wednesday, a spokesman for the Doug Ford campaign told various media outlets. Doug Ford has no campaign events planned.

“I just want to get over this hump on Wednesday and we’ll go from there,” he said.

Rob Ford was hospitalized last Wednesday and diagnosed with an abdominal tumour. He was transferred Thursday from Humber River Hospital to Mount Sinai, where his care is being overseen by renowned colorectal surgeon Zane Cohen. He withdrew from the mayoral election on Friday — but signed up to run for council in Ward 2 (Etobicoke North).

Two mayoral debates that had been scheduled for Tuesday were cancelled after frontrunner John Tory pulled out Monday. He and Olivia Chow are planning to participate in two debates on Wednesday: one at noon for the Churchill Society, one at 6 p.m. for the commercial real estate industry.

Each candidate held a public event on Tuesday. Chow announced the unsurprising endorsements of four left-leaning sitting councillors — her stepson Mike Layton, Gord Perks, Joe Mihevc, and Sarah Doucette — and one favoured candidate, Joe Cressy, who helped organize her campaign.

Mihevc called her a “healing presence.” Doucette cited their shared concern for affordable child care. Chow explicitly promised, for the first time, that she will release a child care policy.

Asked how she would take advantage of the slow transition between Rob Ford and Doug Ford, she said, “I wouldn’t want to take advantage of people when they’re sick.”

Tory, who leans right, has been publicly endorsed by left-leaning John Filion and centrist Jaye Robinson.

Tory appeared outside his campaign office to talk about his proposals to address traffic congestion. He promised to personally chair a roadworks committee that would vet projects a year in advance and ensure there are alternate routes available when construction forces road closures.

“It’s not that I bring any particular genius to this, it’s about the fact that the head of the city government is deeming this to be important enough that you’re going to sit there with the people involved and say, ‘We’re not going to put up with having these things that are, in my view, either incompetent or insensitive,’” he said.

Ipsos Reid released its first poll of the campaign. It put Tory at 43 per cent, Chow 29 per cent and Doug Ford 28 per cent. Chow had been languishing near 20 per cent, in third place, in recent polls by other pollsters.

A narrow majority, 53 per cent, thought it was “appropriate” that Doug Ford replaced Rob Ford on the ballot. Forty-seven per cent said it was not appropriate.

The Ipsos poll included 596people who opted into the firm’s online panels. As a non-random survey, it did not have a margin of error; Ipsos gave its “credibility interval” as 4.6 percentage points, 19 times out of 20.

With files from Tess Kalinowski, David Rider and Sadiya Ansari

Submit News to CKA News U.S. Steel Canada filing for creditor protection
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:37:52 EDT

After years of financial and labour turmoil, U.S. Steel Canada is filing for creditor protection, the company confirmed Tuesday.

?Yes, there is a process underway to receive creditor protection,? said U.S. Steel Canada spokesman Trevor Harris.

In a press release, U.S. Steel said they would seek relief for their Canadian branch under the Companies? Creditors Arrangement Act, which allows corporations in financial distress to restructure.

In the release, the company said U.S. Steel Canada had lost money on operations for the last five years, to the tune of $2.4 billion since December 2009.

Meanwhile, union leader Rolf Gerstenberger, president of United Steelworkers Local 1005, said the move to restructure amounted to ?fraud? and that the company had been deliberately winding down production to the detriment of workers.

?A planned restructuring will allow U.S. Steel Canada to operate and compete more effectively. We know this was not an easy decision for U.S. Steel Canada?s independent directors,? said U.S. Steel president and CEO Mario Longhi in a release. ?U.S. Steel Canada has asked the court for an order allowing it to continue to operate while exploring restructuring alternatives ? to pay its suppliers and employees and to continue to service its customers. We believe these actions will provide longer term stability for U.S. Steel?s employees, suppliers and customers.?

'Nobody saw this coming'

Marvin Ryder, assistant professor of entrepreneurship at the DeGroote School of Business at McMaster University, called the decision to restructure a ?surprise.?

?Nobody saw this coming, or at least I didn?t,? he said.

Still, the company had been buffeted by a turbulent economy since being forged in U.S. Steel?s 2007 purchase of Hamilton-based Stelco.

The timing of the move was bad: the global recession weakened demand for steel, and between November 2008 to March 2009, U.S. Steel laid off over 700 Hamilton workers and slashed production in half.

The steel market still hasn?t fully bounced back from the traumatic recession years, Ryder said. ?Generally, demand for steel has not come back to pre-recession levels,? he noted.

?It?s not so much the recession, it?s the recovery after the recession. We are in the longest recovery of any recession or depression in American economic history or Canadian economic history.?

In 2010, U.S. Steel shut down its Hamilton blast furnace, and locked out 900 Hamilton workers over pensions. The operation there now consists of a ?zinc line,? where steel is coated with zinc, and a coke-making operation, Ryder said.

?From the time U.S. Steel purchased us, they?ve basically been doing different things here in Hamilton to shut down production,? union chief Gerstenberger said. ?We could produce two million pounds of slabs and they?re saying, ?No that?s useless.? ?

Remaining viable in Canada

For its part, the company has argued that creditor protection is necessary to remain viable in Canada.

?Despite substantial efforts over the past several years to make U.S. Steel Canada profitable, it is clear that restructuring U.S. Steel Canada is critical to improving our long-term business outlook,? said company president Michael McQuade in a statement Tuesday. ?Operational changes, cost reduction initiatives and streamlining of operations cannot on their own make it competitive in the current environment.?

Employment in the Hamilton steel industry has been dwindling for years. Local 1005 has fewer than 600 active members, but represents over 8,000 pensioners, Gerstenberger said.

U.S. Steel Canada also has operations in Nanticoke, Ont .

The company has feuded with the Canadian government over steadily declining output since its arrival north of the border. In 2009, the federal government sued U.S. Steel for failing to meet promises around production and spending.

The parties settled in 2011, with the company agreeing to invest at least $50 million in its Nanticoke and Hamilton operations by December 2015.

Submit News to CKA News Five Maple Leafs prospects who impressed at rookie tournament
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 18:24:44 EDT

LONDON, ONT.—Antoine Bibeau is a name that is rocketing up the charts.

Bibeau backstopped the Maple Leafs rookies to a 2-0 shutout of the Pittsburgh Penguins on Tuesday as the Toronto prospects finished their four-team tournament with a 2-1-0 record.

It was perhaps fitting that Bibeau got the 25-save shutout at Budweiser Gardens. This is the home of the OHL’s London Knights and here in May he recorded a 51-save shutout in a 1-0 win by his Val d’Or Foreurs over the Knights in the Memorial Cup.

It was a performance that made the hockey world say, “Wait. Who?”

The 20-year-old was drafted 172nd overall by the Leafs in the 2013 draft and though he might be fifth on the depth chart — maybe even sixth if training camp invitee Cal Heeter catches on — he won’t be that far down for long.

“Whenever I have a chance to make an impression, I want to,” said Bibeau. “Today was that day. I’m going to try to do the same thing every day for training camp.

The six-foot-two goalie made a few outstanding saves in his only performance here, including a reaction glove save that kept the game scoreless in the first period. But his hallmark seems to be holding his ground, with little extra movements.

“I’m a big goalie. I like playing that way,” he said.

Bibeau is most definitely in the mix for the Marlies job, competing with Garret Sparks and Christopher Gibson.

“He is calm and at times we had a few barrages in our own end and that’s what you want from a goalie,” said Marlies assistant coach Derek King, who handled the bench Tuesday. “There was no panic to his game.

“He was very composed.”

Leafs camp opens Thursday with medicals. Outside of Bibeau’s performance, there were a few other players who had a solid rookie tournament.

William Nylander, F

The eighth overall pick from the June draft played only one game, but showed his explosive speed and talent that separated him from the rest of the players. He wanted the puck, he set up plays and he backchecked, twice stopping scoring chances. He picked up one assist on a great pass to David Broll.

Viktor Loov, D

Outside of Nylander, he was the Leaf most were talking about. He’s an imposing physical player at six-foot-two, 194 pounds. A Swede taken in the seventh round in 2012, he is not afraid to lay out a check and looks like he might thrive on smaller ice. “When he hits, he goes through people,” said Marlies coach Gord Dineen. He may have to learn to fight, given the reaction of the opposition whenever he got off a big hit. If he doesn’t make the Leafs, he’ll be sent to Sweden. The AHL is not an option, give his contract with Modo.

Connor Brown, F

He played twice and had a goal and an assist. At six feet, the 20-year-old, sixth-rounder from the 2012 draft has put together a complete two-way game and feels increasingly comfortable with the pro life that awaits. “I want to play as best as I can at camp and end up in the best place possible.” He could go back to junior as an over-age player, but if he can get serious minutes with the Marlies, that might be the best fit for him.

Brett Findlay, F

You probably haven’t heard of him, but the 21-year-old led the Leaf rookies in scoring with two goals and two assists. He has signed with the Marlies, but is aiming higher. “I came in here with nothing to lose,” said Findlay. “A lot of people didn’t know too much about me and I just tried to make a good impression.” One executive who does know about him: Leafs assistant GM Kyle Dubas, who had Findlay on his Soo Greyhounds roster.

Submit News to CKA News Blood test could diagnose major depression
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 15:58:16 EDT

Researchers at Northwestern University in Chicago have developed a blood test that may be able to identify people suffering from clinical depression.

“Treatment starts with a precise diagnosis,” said Eva Redei, the paper’s lead author and a professor of psychiatry and behavioural sciences at Northwestern.

Doctors currently diagnose the disease by looking at symptoms — like identifying an animal by examining the size and shape of its paw prints. With an accurate, objective blood test, doctors could get a look at the animal itself.

Researchers at Northwestern took blood samples from 32 patients with clinical depression, as well as 32 samples from patients without depression to use as a control.

Their work was published Tuesday in Translational Psychiatry.

Related:

New head of Ontario Bar Association speaks out about depression

Lesson from Robin Williams: Take depression seriously

Ketamine seen as promising new depression drug

Samples taken from patients with depression showed different levels of nine markers than patients who were not depressed.

Markers are chemicals which can indicate the expression of a particular gene. Testing for the identified markers could allow doctors to find out if a patient is clinically depressed, Redei said.

“It’s an objective test, so this will not depend on whether a patient wants to talk or is able to talk to a physician,” she explained.

The test also appears to predict whether a patient with depression will respond to cognitive behavioural therapy.

Samples taken before therapy showed that patients who improved after therapy had different levels of several markers than patients who did not.

Both groups of patients had similar levels of three other markers, which the researchers said could point to a basic genetic predisposition for major depression.

The research could also guide scientists looking for similar tests to diagnose other mental illnesses, like post-traumatic stress or anxiety disorders, Redei said.

In 2012, about 5.4 per cent of Canadians over age 15 reported that they had experienced symptoms of major depression or mood disorders, according to Statistics Canada.

Redei said the researchers hope to confirm their results in larger studies.

If they are able to find funding, a larger study could be finished in about two years, she said.

Depending on those results, researchers could then submit a test to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for approval. It could then be ordered and administered like any other blood test.

Submit News to CKA News Slain Afghan man was his family's hope for a better life in Canada
Tue, 16 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

Abdul Monir left two children, a wife and a life as a teacher behind when he left Afghanistan. He arrived in Canada as a refugee applicant 10 months ago and had started building a different kind of life here. Though he studied law in Afghanistan, he had just started a job at Halal Pizza Time Restaurant in a Scarborough strip mall.

Monir’s relatives in Canada and the United States say he was looking forward to his permanent residency hearing, scheduled for next Monday. For him, it was the first step toward being reunited with his wife, Nilofer, and children Hadia, 4, and Ahmad Emran, who is just 2.

But the 31-year-old was shot and killed at the pizza shop just after midnight on Sunday. The restaurant’s owner, Rahim Dorani, was also shot and remains in hospital. Police are considering the theory the incident was a robbery gone wrong.

“He wanted to secure his family’s future,” a bleary-eyed Jaweed Rasuli, Monir’s cousin, said Monday evening. “He went through so much hardship and turmoil to get an education in Afghanistan, and said to himself: ‘Why not bring my kids here? Why not let them have an education with peace of mind without a bomb going off? Let them enjoy school and take on a career that is promising.’”

Fluent in English, well-educated and with a reputation as an incredibly kind person, he initially struggled with the idea of spending long days in the pizza shop, say relatives. The hope of reuniting with his young children, however, saw him through.

Monir talked about his children endlessly, relatives recalled. He eagerly shared tales over Skype about Hadia’s first day at school and Ahmad Emran learning to walk. His Facebook profile is full of photos of his smiling kids, including one of them sitting on their father’s lap in a rose garden.

He was also supporting his parents and in-laws when he died, keeping very little for himself, said Rasuli, who drove up to Toronto with his father from Maryland as soon as they heard the news.

“It’s extremely hard for the entire family,” he said. “You come from a country that has been war-torn for 30 years and arrive in a place that you know to be very calm … You have a future for yourself here. And then you get shot.”

No arrests have been made.

Abdul Rasuli said the death came as a huge blow to Monir’s large family of eight siblings and numerous nieces and nephews, still mourning the death of Monir’s brother and nephew, who drowned in Afghanistan less than two years ago.

Monir’s father, a retired police officer, fainted when he was told of his son’s death, Jaweed said. His mother, who has a heart condition, has yet to be informed, while his wife is so distraught she can barely speak.

“At first, we thought we would bury him over here, but his father called me from Afghanistan and said they want to see the body,” said Abdul Rasuli. “If they see the body in Afghanistan, it might help.”

The family said that now they can only hope the government will come through and that Monir’s killer will be caught.

Rasuli, with his father, Abdul, and Monir’s brother-in-law, Baktash Wafa, met with senior members of the Afghan-Canadian community Monday evening to discuss their next steps.

The family is appealing to the Canadian government to help bring Monir’s wife and children here. They have also set up a trust fund to cover the cost of sending Monir’s body back to Afghanistan, estimated at about $20,000, as well as enough to support his family as they recover from their loss.

“He had lots of hope,” said Wafa, his brother-in-law. “He always talked about this country as being a country of peace. He couldn’t wait to see his children again.”

Donations to the trust fund in Abdul Monir’s name are being accepted at afghancanada.com. Anyone with information on the shooting can contact Toronto police homicide squad at 416-808-7400.

Submit News to CKA News Canada?s wild digital frontier needs policing
Wed, 09 Feb 2011 03:08:26 Z
John Ivison: The copyright bill has a number of provisions that are far less favourable to Canada’s performers and creators, who are about to see take a big hit to their pocket-books
Submit News to CKA News Election buzz, stale rhetoric ? Parliament has deja vu all over again
Tue, 01 Feb 2011 11:42:28 Z
John Ivison: If you missed Question Period Monday, don’t worry — you have a golden opportunity to miss it again Tuesday
Submit News to CKA News Death of Personal Responsibility: Think outside the lunchbox
Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:50:39 Z
Neil Seeman: So what should the role of the state be in combating obesity? It’s time to think outside of the lunchbox, and try a whole new idea: healthy living vouchers, or HLVs
Submit News to CKA News Don?t give Quebec a nickel
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:57:55 Z
Jonathan Kay: If Harper says no to the Bloc's demands, he will be going to the voters as a man of principle who stood his ground on a subject far more important to this country than corporate tax rates
Submit News to CKA News Stelmach more than a victim of changing attitudes
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:38:13 Z
Kevin Libin: Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach bet the fortune of his party’s unparalleled political dynasty on a leadership strategy that failed to pan out
Submit News to CKA News Dave Taylor a mixed blessing for fledgling Alberta Party
Tue, 25 Jan 2011 02:34:30 Z
Kevin Libin: The addition of former Liberal MLA Dave Taylor to the Alberta party gives it a legitimacy boost, but does the outspoken former radio personality fit with the party's post-partisan dreams?
Submit News to CKA News Playing by China's rules
Sun, 23 Jan 2011 19:21:17 Z
Rex Murphy: China has reached an agreement with the Newfoundland government to begin the importation of seal and seal products into its potentially vast market. This is both very good and rare news for Newfoundland sealers
Submit News to CKA News Canada: Nanny AND wimpy state?
Thu, 20 Jan 2011 20:08:14 Z
Before, there actually had to be a violent protest before public institutions caved in and cancelled controversial events. Now, a group of unhinged zealots make a couple of angry phone calls and – poof! – they silence free speech and free assembly
Submit News to CKA News Executives probably not swayed by Liberal tax plan
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 23:54:00 Z
Scott Stinson: It’s a safe bet that Mr. Ignatieff did not win many converts with his tax-increase sales pitch to Canadian executives on Tuesday. This is not a great surprise
Submit News to CKA News Conservatives missed the call for more civilized debate
Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:58:11 Z
Kelly McParland: The federal Conservatives’ brain trust must have been somewhere else when President Barack Obama delivered his speech in Arizona last week, calling for greater civility in political debate.
Submit News to CKA News Harper's five years: Canadians better off, even if they don't feel it
Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:21:36 Z
John Ivison: Jan. 23 marks the fifth anniversary of Stephen Harper’s 2006 election victory and in early February, he will pass Lester B. Pearson’s time in office to become Canada’s 11th longest-serving Prime Minister

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