Canada Newswatch

The CKA Canada Newswatch is a companion to our in-house Canada News system.
The Newswatch is a collection of various Canadian news feeds in one convenient location.


CKA members can use the Canada newswatch to promote stories from the newswatch to the CKA News Links.

Click the Submit News-link to CKA News button to quickly submit news.

Daily Canada Newswatch

Submit News to CKA News Police solve mystery of 'creepy' dolls left on doorsteps of girls
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:30:09 -0400
They sent a creepy feeling through several Southern California families, but authorities say the person who left porcelain dolls on doorsteps didn't mean any harm.
Submit News to CKA News 'Incompetent' Ottawa doctor agrees to never practice medicine again
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:26:41 -0400
An Ottawa doctor whose clinic was at the centre of an infection scare has agreed never to practice medicine again after the College of Physicians and Surgeons found her unprofessional and incompetent.
Submit News to CKA News Steve Adsley survives after stroke by drinking toilet water for 7 days - CBC.ca
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:21:00 GMT

CBC.ca

Steve Adsley survives after stroke by drinking toilet water for 7 days
CBC.ca
A 62-year-old man from Dawson Creek, B.C., who survived a stroke in his washroom by drinking toilet water for seven days, is hoping his story will help others avoid a similar situation. Steve Adsley, who lives in a condo unit, says he was going about his usual ...

and more »
Submit News to CKA News Brothers die in tractor accident in southwest Saskatchewan - Regina Leader-Post
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:13:40 GMT

CTV News

Brothers die in tractor accident in southwest Saskatchewan
Regina Leader-Post
The town of Eastend is in mourning after two brothers were killed in a tractor accident on Wednesday night. The boys, aged 10 and 16, died near Ravenscrag, a rural community 30 kilometres west of Eastend. Photograph by: Rachel Psutka , Leader-Post.
Brothers killed in tractor accidentStarPhoenix
2 boys killed in Saskatchewan after tractor tumbles into ravineCTV News
Ravenscrag area boys perish in tractor accidentSouthwest Booster

all 18 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News New Brunswick RCMP investigate two sudden deaths of young women within ... - National Post
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:13:21 GMT

National Post

New Brunswick RCMP investigate two sudden deaths of young women within ...
National Post
MONCTON, N.B. ? RCMP are investigating two sudden deaths that occurred within weeks at the same apartment in Moncton, N.B.. Police say they were called to an apartment on Gordon Street on Wednesday where a 22-year-old woman had died.
RCMP officers injured in Moncton shootings thank public for supportWinnipeg Free Press
June 4 Shooting Victim Mounties Thank Canadians for SupportOye! Times
Mounties injured in Moncton shooting thank Cdns for supportCANOE
Toronto Sun
all 27 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News New Brunswick RCMP investigate two sudden deaths of young women within weeks at same apartment
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:13:12 +0000
RCMP are investigating two sudden deaths that occurred within weeks at the same apartment in Moncton, N.B.
Submit News to CKA News Teen girl who swam across Lake Ontario begins Lake Erie challenge
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:03:36 Z
ERIE, Pa. — A teen girl believed to be the youngest to swim across Lake Ontario two years ago is now taking on an even bigger challenge: a marathon swim across Lake Erie. Annaleise Carr has started a 75-kilometre trek — one […]
Submit News to CKA News Five Quebecers on doomed Air Algérie flight
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:00:11 Z
A Sherbrooke woman and four Montreal-area family members were aboard the Air Algérie flight that crashed in northern Mali Thursday.
Submit News to CKA News Air Canada flight to Tel Aviv circles above airport after rockets fired
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:00:00 -0400
An Air Canada flight to Tel Aviv circled above Israel's main international airport before landing on Friday after rockets were fired at the airport. The Israeli army confirmed that three rockets were fired at Ben Gurion Airport Friday morning. They were all shot down by Israel's Iron Dome defence system.
Submit News to CKA News Air Algerie Flight AH5017: Gatineau resident believes family was on board - CBC.ca
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:38:27 GMT

CBC.ca

Air Algerie Flight AH5017: Gatineau resident believes family was on board
CBC.ca
Mamadou Zoungrana bought his wife and two sons tickets for Air Algerie Flight AH5017 in what was meant to be the first leg in their trip to join him for a new life in Gatineau, Que., after two years apart. Air Algerie Flight AH5017: Canadian family of 4 on board ...
Family of Gatineau man aboard downed Air Algerie flight580 CFRA Radio
Gatineau man loses family in Air Algérie plane crashOttawa Citizen

all 8 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News 5 things to know in Toronto for Friday, July 25 - CTV News
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:31:54 GMT

CTV News

5 things to know in Toronto for Friday, July 25
CTV News
WEATHER. The end of the work week will likely be sunny with some cloud coverage in the afternoon. Environment Canada says the daytime high will be 26 C, and temperatures are expected to drop to a low of 16 C Friday night. IN THE NEWS. Ford Fest.
Rob Ford: Toronto mayor to host Ford Fest bash tonightCBC.ca
Rob Ford promises fun at Ford Fest ? even without the liquor licenceMacleans.ca
Ford Fest party to hit Toronto park tonightYorkRegion.com
CP24 Toronto's Breaking News -Huffington Post Canada
all 49 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Nova Star sails through seven year loan in just two months - CTV News
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:26:29 GMT

CTV News

Nova Star sails through seven year loan in just two months
CTV News
Just two months into operation the owners of the Nova Scotia to Maine ferry have burned through a 21-million dollar loan from the province. The money for Nova Star Cruises had been committed over seven years. Economic Development Minister Michel ...
Nova Scotia money for Yarmouth-to-Maine ferry all spentGlobalnews.ca
Opposition to 'fracking' expressed at Yarmouth meetingHants Journal

all 20 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News What you need to know Friday in Toronto: News, weather and events
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:24:07 EDT

Weather and Traffic:

Friday will be a beautiful day in Toronto with a mix of sun and cloud and a high of 26C.

Make sure to lather on some sunscreen before going outside because UV levels will be very high, according to Environment Canada.

The good weather will extend into the evening with a light breeze and a low of 16C. There is a 60 per cent chance of showers overnight into Saturday.

TTC and Go Transit were not reporting any major delays and flights in and out of Pearson and Billy Bishop Airport are running on schedule. Air Canada resumed flights to Tel Aviv Thursday evening. That flight had to circle around Ben Gurion Airport Friday morning as the airport was shelled by rocket fire just when it was due to land.

The 505 Dundas streetcar in both directions is diverted via McCaul St. to College St., before turning on Bathurst St. due to construction at Dundas and Spadina Sts.. Until Aug. 31, the 510 Spadina streetcar will be replaced by buses with one lane open in each direction.

Events:

  • The Beaches International Jazz Festival continues through the rest of week until July 27. Concerts are held at the Woodbine Park and along a two kilometre stretch of Queen St. E. — the Beaches’ main street. Queen Street E. will be closed this weekend from Woodbine Ave. to Beech Ave. from 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. nightly. The north/south streets of Waverley Ave., Wineva Ave., and Lee Ave. will remain open throughout the evening.
  • The T & T Waterfront Night Market treats visitors to an authentic Asian night market experience with a range of Asian street foods and vendors from across the province. It starts Friday from 6 p.m. to 12 a.m. and runs through the rest of the week. It is at Port Lands at 222 Cherry St. It costs $3 to get in.
  • Taste of Toronto begins Thursday at Fork York from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and runs through the rest of the weekend. The event gives people a chance to engage top chefs and enjoy live food demonstrations.
  • The Toronto Burlesque Festival returns Thursday and continues throughout the weekend. Emerging and established artists will showcase their talent at various venues across the city. Visit the website for more information.
  • Toronto’s Festival of Beer begins Friday at 4 p.m. and runs until Sunday. The annual event takes place at Bandshell Park, Exhibition Place, and celebrates Canada’s rich brewing history by featuring more than 300 brands from around the world and many Ontario craft brewers. Tickets cost between $40 and $49.
  • Summer means festivals for beer enthusiasts

  • For more events visit the city’s official website.
  • Top headlines:

  • Five Canadians, including a couple, their two children and a mother of three, were aboard the Air Algerie flight that crashed in Mali, West Africa, Thursday. The flight from Burkina Faso to Algiers was carrying 116 passengers, the majority of whom are French. It’s not clear what caused the crash, but bad weather is believed to be a factor.
  • The Toronto Blue Jays beat the Boston Red Sox 8-0 Thursday afternoon earning three wins in the four-game series. Starting pitcher Marcus Stroman gave up just one hit in seven innings of work.
  • Three members of an Irish republican group were detained and denied entry to Canada at Pearson International Airport on Wednesday, according to a newspaper in Northern Ireland. The men, said to be on a six-day speaking tour, were members of the 32 County Sovereignty Movement (32 CSM), a fringe republican organization.
  • A town in southern Manitoba recently discovered a ban on alcohol sales, which has existed as long as anyone can remember, was never actually put into law. It’s something residents have always just assumed was official.
  • MPPs living within relatively easy driving distance of Queen’s Park are spending tens of thousands of taxpayer dollars a year to live in Toronto, according to information released Thursday on MPPs travel expenses and accommodation.
  • Did you know?

    Toronto’s average summer water production is enough to fill the Rogers Centre to the top every single day, according to the City of Toronto.

    A look back:

    On July 25, 1969, parliament amends the Official Languages Act to declare English and French the official languages of Canada. The principals of act were broadened and enshrined in Canada’s constitution in 1982 through the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

    Submit News to CKA News Pilot OK after CF-18 struck by lightning in Alberta - CTV News
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:09:40 GMT

    CTV News

    Pilot OK after CF-18 struck by lightning in Alberta
    CTV News
    WHITECOURT, Alta. -- The pilot of a CF-18 on its way to an air show in northwestern Alberta landed safely Thursday morning after it was struck by lightning. Whitecourt airport manager William Stewart says the pilot reported the plane's electronics flashed, but ...
    Hanover Pilot Hit by LightningBayshore Broadcasting News Centre
    Pilot forced to land after plane struck by lightning570 News
    CF-18 struck by lightning near WhitecourtEdmonton Journal

    all 36 news articles »
    Submit News to CKA News California man, 80, guns down pregnant home intruder: 'I shot her twice'
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:02:00 -0400
    An 80-year-old man who came home to find two burglars says he shot and killed one of them despite her pleas that she was pregnant, but it's her alleged accomplice who has been arrested on suspicion of murder.
    Submit News to CKA News Ontario Liberals waste no time playing hardball with opposition - The Globe and Mail
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:00:46 GMT

    Toronto Star

    Ontario Liberals waste no time playing hardball with opposition
    The Globe and Mail
    The Ontario Liberals have wasted little time throwing around the weight of their majority government. In the opening days of the new parliament, they demanded six out of nine seats on most legislative committees ? even though the seat count in the legislature ...
    Time to make good on sex-ed reform promiseCambridge Times
    Liberals pass budget as Ontario legislature breaks until OctoberToronto Star
    Ontario Liberal budget passes easilyNorthumberland Today
    Sun News Network
    all 70 news articles »
    Submit News to CKA News After tackling Lake Ontario, teen swimmer sets off on Lake Erie marathon
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:37:48 -0400
    Annaleise Carr, 16, began her voyage at 5:21 a.m. in calm conditions
    Submit News to CKA News Rocket fire targets Tel Aviv airport just as Air Canada flight due to land
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:28:00 EDT

    An Air Canada flight from Toronto to Tel Aviv, Israel, was forced to circle above Ben Gurion International Airport after reports the airport was targeted by three rockets Friday.

    Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military arm, confirmed via Twitter that it had fired three M75 missiles at the airport around 11:45 a.m. local time.

    An Israeli military spokesperson confirmed to Al Jazeera that rockets were fired towards the airport from the Gaza Strip.

    A number of online flight trackers showed flight AC84 circling over Israel several times before landing safely at 12:07 p.m.

    A phone call to Air Canada early Friday morning was not immediately returned.

    It comes three days after Air Canada joined U.S. and European airlines in suspending flights to Israel after a rocket landed near Tel Aviv airport on Tuesday.

    Air Canada promptly cancelled the daily route from Toronto to Tel Aviv shortly after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration ordered all U.S. airlines to suspend flights to Tel Aviv for 24 hours. The directive was extended Wednesday and Air Canada followed suit.

    Thursday evening’s departure from Toronto was Air Canada’s first flight after resuming operations to Israel. It departed Pearson International Airport shortly after 6 p.m.

    Germany’s two largest airlines have not yet resumed flights to Israel even though the European Aviation Safety Agency has lifted its recommendation that airlines avoid flying to Tel Aviv airport.

    Air Berlin told the Associated Press that flights to Tel Aviv remain suspended until at least midday Friday, while Lufthansa said all flights to the airport on Friday have been cancelled because of ongoing security concerns.

    With files from the Associated Press.

    Submit News to CKA News Rob Ford promises fun at Ford Fest ? even without the liquor licence
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:27:02 +0000

    Toronto spokeswoman has said the mayor's office has been warned there can be no campaigning at Ford Fest.

    The post Rob Ford promises fun at Ford Fest ? even without the liquor licence appeared first on Macleans.ca.

    Submit News to CKA News David vs. Goliath: Family feud leads to workers' revolt at supermarket chain
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:26:45 -0400
    It's been called a David vs. Goliath story, a "Tale of Two Arthurs" and even the "ultimate Greek tragedy," but the characters in this drama are not Biblical or literary figures. They're grocery store owners.
    Submit News to CKA News Taiwan plane crash survivor crawls through hole, phones dad to pick her up
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:23:14 -0400
    The 10 survivors of Taiwan's worst air disaster in more than a decade include a 34-year-old woman who called her father after scrambling from the wreckage and seeking help at a nearby home.
    Submit News to CKA News Indian teen has 232 teeth removed from mouth
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:19:00 -0400
    Dental surgeons in India's largest city say they have removed 232 small "tooth-like structures" from the mouth of a teenage boy with a rare medical condition.
    Submit News to CKA News French president says there were no survivors in Air Algerie crash
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:10:33 +0000

    MD-83 flight disappeared Thursday

    The post French president says there were no survivors in Air Algerie crash appeared first on Macleans.ca.

    Submit News to CKA News Israeli aircraft strike 30 Gaza homes, kill senior militant
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:09:00 -0400
    Israeli aircraft struck 30 houses in the Gaza Strip early Friday, killing a leader of the militant Islamic Jihad group and two of his sons, as Israel's Security Cabinet was to meet later in the day to decide whether to expand its operation or consider ideas for a cease-fire.
    Submit News to CKA News 16-year-old swimmer begins Lake Erie crossing
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:07:47 +0000

    Annaleise Carr started 75-kilometre trek early Friday morning

    The post 16-year-old swimmer begins Lake Erie crossing appeared first on Macleans.ca.

    Submit News to CKA News Black box found at site of Air Algerie plane crash
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:02:00 -0400
    French soldiers have secured a black box from the wreckage of an Air Algerie plane that went down in a desolate region of restive northern Mali, the French president said Friday.
    Submit News to CKA News From Peru, with love ? the Mike Duffy story
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:00:00 EDT

    He was a dashing former war correspondent turned popular TV personality, covering breaking national news in the capital of a mysterious northern land called Canada.

    She was an ex-employee of the Peruvian Navy, recently released from an Ontario women’s prison after smuggling drugs — unwittingly, she says — aboard a flight from South America.

    They met, they fell in love — or something like it — and the rest is either a cringe-inducing chronicle of unsafe sex involving a man who should have known better, or else an epic tale of longing and passion that’s worthy of a Latin American soap opera or telenovela.

    In Lima, they seem to be taking the telenovela approach.

    Behold Peruvian TV’s melodramatic take on the amorous adventures of Mike Duffy and Yvette Benites, also starring their putative Peruvian-Canadian love child — a.k.a. Karen Duffy — whose long, heartfelt search for the man she believes to be her biological father provides the main plot motor for a story Peruvians are calling Mi Padre el Senador — My father, the senator.

    That is the title of a Peruvian mini-epic that aired Sunday night on Punto Final, a weekly newsmagazine on TV station Frecuencia Latina in Lima.

    Accompanied by countless portentous drum rolls, the documentary charts a decades-long tale of indiscretion, desire and denial that is by now familiar to most Canadians ever since the story broke earlier this month by Maclean’s magazine.

    It centres on Duffy, of course — the disgraced former senator who turned a longtime gig as a much-admired TV interviewer into a lucrative spot on the Conservative side of the Canadian parliament’s upper house. Unfortunately, he got himself into money trouble along the way and now faces 31 criminal charges related to his Senate expenses.

    Duffy has declared himself innocent on all counts, a response that parallels his initial reaction to allegations he is the father of an unacknowledged Peruvian daughter, now 32, whose full name is Karen Duffy Benites and who lives with her businessman husband and their three young daughters in La Molina, an upscale neighbourhood of Lima.

    The woman recently launched a paternity suit in the Superior Court of Lima in hopes of proving Duffy is her father, after years of sending him plaintive emails without receiving a reply.

    It would be an exaggeration to say the Mike Duffy love scandal is the top news story in Peru these days, but many newspapers and other news outlets are covering the tale, and tens of thousands of limenos — as residents of the capital are known — are now familiar with two Canadians, just one of whom is named Bieber.

    Twelve minutes long, the documentary tells a tale of thwarted love and lingering silence, a romance that began well but went awry.

    Thanks to a shared connection to Duffy’s sister, Moira, the Canadian newsman and the young Peruvian ex-con spoke on the phone one day while both were living in Ottawa — she in a halfway house following her release from jail. This was in the early 1980s.

    “He said, ‘You have a beautiful voice,’ ” Benites tells reporter Fabricio Escajadillo. “What are you doing later on?”

    According to the Peruvian program’s slightly overwrought version, what followed was “three months of passionate relations in the cold of Canada.”

    It all ended on a grim day, while Duffy was travelling out of town, when Benites was informed she would be deported within 24 hours.

    She never saw or heard from her Canadian paramour again.

    In the months that followed, she sent him cards, letters, photos, even cassettes with recordings of her infant daughter’s cries. But Duffy never wrote back, she says.

    Later, her daughter took up the task of uniting with a man the Peruvian documentary inaccurately identifies as “one of the richest” politicians in Canada.

    Karen Duffy tells the show’s reporter she has no monetary interest in seeking contact with Duffy.

    “I want him to know,” she says, “and to turn his head to see that here in Peru, in a country where he never imagined it, there is a piece of him. That is me, and I am waiting for him.”

    The narrator ends the documentary with a poignant thought.

    “Who would have said that, after a career filled with denunciations and dark moments, in the faraway land of Peru, there exists a woman who wants to give Mike Duffy a hug?”

    Who indeed?

    Submit News to CKA News Nasty storm drops hail and heavy rain throughout Saskatchewan communities
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:28:50 -0400
    Power went out in a number of communities including Regina, where the downtown and several neighbourhoods were affected
    Submit News to CKA News With a majority, contrite Wynne strategy toward gas-plants mess may be history
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:00:00 -0400
    Kathleen Wynne just led the Liberals to a remarkable victory in part by presenting herself as a straight shooter with a genuine commitment to running a more open government than the one she inherited
    Submit News to CKA News Convicted enforcer faces four new charges from Burnaby shooting
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:01:37 Z
    Last fall, convicted drug gang enforcer Trevor (Trey) Taylor was released on $5,000 bail in Kamloops after being charged with extortion, robbery and use of an imitation firearm. Last month, he allegedly shot a 51-year-old man in a Burnaby mall parking lot.
    Submit News to CKA News Judge narrows terms of lawsuit against Canucks, owner
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 05:36:27 Z
    A B.C. Supreme Court judge has narrowed the terms of a wrongful-dismissal lawsuit against the Vancouver Canucks Limited Partnership and its chairman, Francesco Aquilini. Italian sports psychologist Bruno Demichelis, who was employed by the Canucks from July 1, 2012 to January 31, 2013, sued Aquilini and the hockey club after his two-year contract was terminated after six months.
    Submit News to CKA News Lions to honour Geroy Simon before facing Blue Bombers
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 05:36:27 Z
    “Old soldiers never die, they just fade away,” U.S. army general Douglas MacArthur famously said, although he was not really speaking for himself.
    Submit News to CKA News Summer storm too much for some streets - CBC.ca
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 04:19:33 GMT

    CBC.ca

    Summer storm too much for some streets
    CBC.ca
    A storm system that blew through Saskatchewan late in the day Thursday led to some flash flooding of some streets. The full extent of the severe weather was not immediately known, however there were reports of several power outages in different parts of the ...
    Nasty storm drops hail and heavy rain throughout Saskatchewan communitiesThe Globe and Mail
    Severe storms moving across south and central Saskatchewan ThursdayNews Talk 650 CKOM

    all 8 news articles »
    Submit News to CKA News Doctor behind Ottawa hepatitis, HIV scare agrees not to practise medicine again
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:51:24 +0000
    Dr. Christiane Farazli was ordered in 2011 to stop performing endoscopies at her clinic after being found using improper cleaning procedures for patients
    Submit News to CKA News Powell Street Festival looking for new venue due to Oppenheimer Park protest
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:34:37 Z
    Next weekend’s Powell Street Festival will not be using Oppenheimer Park — its planned main stage area — because several dozen people are camping in the park to protest homelessness. Festival organizers have yet to find a new venue, but are discussing options with the city.
    Submit News to CKA News Canada urged to beef up security at border in wake of Hasibullah Yusufzai case
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:34:20 Z
    Canada’s security officials need to give serious thought to beefing up controls at the border in the wake of the revelation that a British Columbia man managed to slip out of the country despite allegedly being on the “no-fly” list, […]
    Submit News to CKA News More public swimming spaces expected to open
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:34:12 Z
    For more than a decade, excited swimmers have braved the chilly waters of the Old Port, hoping that taking an dip in the St. Lawrence River would push the city to open more beaches. Now, after their biggest year yet, their efforts seem to be paying off.
    Submit News to CKA News B.C. dangerous offender who had victim tattoo name on stomach loses appeal of convictions
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:33:58 Z
    A dangerous offender who claimed to be a gynecologist and convinced one victim to tattoo a name across her stomach has lost an appeal of several sexual-assault convictions in a British Columbia court.
    Submit News to CKA News In age of technology, how can airliners simply vanish?
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 03:33:56 Z
    it is easy to forget that aviation tracking technology can sometimes prove limited and fallible, especially at 35,000 feet in the air, or over an ocean or other desolate parts of the planet.
    Submit News to CKA News Don Cayo: Tax audits aimed at Harper government critics should worry all ... - Vancouver Sun
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:59:57 GMT

    CTV News

    Don Cayo: Tax audits aimed at Harper government critics should worry all ...
    Vancouver Sun
    VANCOUVER ? The Canadian Press's list of charities being audited for political activities by the Canada Revenue Agency reads suspiciously like a Who's Who of the Canadian left. Vancouver-based Tides Canada and the David Suzuki Foundation, the ...
    Canada Revenue Agency says 'preventing poverty' not allowed as goal for charityThe Globe and Mail

    all 101 news articles »
    Submit News to CKA News Vancouver police search illegal marijuana shop
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:50:50 Z
    Police searched what they called an illegal East Vancouver marijuana shop Thursday afternoon after receiving reports that weed was being purchased at the store then sold to neighbourhood youth.
    Submit News to CKA News ?Dry? Manitoba community discovers it never had an official booze ban
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:50:24 -0400
    Staff with the Rural Municipality of Hanover discovered this week that a ban on alcohol sales, which has existed as long as anyone can remember, was never actually put into law
    Submit News to CKA News Killer of B.C. family 32 years ago waives his parole review
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:41:20 Z
    A man convicted of killing six members of a British Columbia family 32 years ago has withdrawn his application for day parole and waived his right to a parole review.
    Submit News to CKA News JGH?s Pavilion K geared for future of medicine
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:40:32 Z
    To the medical staff, the 12-storey building under construction in back of the Jewish General Hospital is known simply as Pavilion K. But that name belies the poetry of its internal architecture, with a soaring atrium in its main entrance and panoramic views of the distant Laurentian Mountains in most patient rooms.
    Submit News to CKA News Recycling organizations team up at central Vancouver facility
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:40:21 Z
    Two recycling organizations — one for profit, the other not — have teamed up to lease a renovated, 30,000-square-foot city-owned industrial site in Vancouver. The Green Recycling Hub in the 400-block Industrial Ave. is a collaboration of Recycling Alternative, a for-profit company that recycles a variety of products (including paper and cardboard, compost, mixed containers, batteries and electronic waste) and United We Can, a non-profit beverage-container recycler that generates income for binners and for residents of the Downtown Eastside.
    Submit News to CKA News Mario Canseco: B.C. in a three-way split on the monarchy, poll finds
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:39:33 Z
    For British Columbia, anything “royal” means business. Our capital is named after the longest-serving monarch. Our province is the only one in Canada that features the word “British” in its name. We may not be worth the estimated 107 million pounds that Pricewaterhouse Coopers says London made during the last high-profile royal wedding, but Victoria is the place to go to for everything that feels British, whether it is scones or commemorative plates. Not long ago, Lonely Planet described our capital city as “a dreamy version of England that never really was (with) every flagpole adorned with a Union Jack.”
    Submit News to CKA News Hydro poles in middle of sidewalk all part of the plan: city
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 01:39:29 Z
    Hydro poles immersed in the middle of a newly poured sidewalk in Montreal North were all part of the plan, Montreal city officials said Thursday.
    Submit News to CKA News Eau Canada: Caravan brings 1,000 litres of Canadian water to bankrupt Detroit in protest
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:32:28 -0400
    The Canadians rallied outside City Hall before heading for St. Peter?s Episcopal Church to deliver the water
    Submit News to CKA News Two charged after search finds cocaine, hashish, marijuana and crystal meth
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:16:40 EDT

    Two suspects from Caledon have been charged in connection with a drug investigation after Caledon OPP and members from the Drug Enforcement Unit recovered various substances at a home in the Village of Bolton.

    Authorities executed a search warrant on July 11 and found what they believe to be cocaine, hashish, marijuana and crystal meth. According to a press release, police also recovered a quantity of cash at the home.

    Zachary Malcolm Allen, 21, was arrested and charged with trafficking, possession for the purpose of trafficking, and three counts of possession for two different classifications of drugs.

    Cassandra Goncalves, 19, was arrested and charged with trafficking and possession for the purpose of trafficking.

    Allen has already appeared in court and Goncalves is scheduled to appear in August.

    Submit News to CKA News Justices of the peace play vital role in courts ? often without a law education
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:54:03 EDT

    They preside over some of the heaviest legal caseloads in the country, ruling innocence or guilt as many as 60 times per day.

    For most Ontarians, a justice of the peace is the closest thing to a judge they will see. Yet, unlike a judge, no legal experience or education is required to be one.

    They decide who gets bail and whose homes police search. They preside over traffic offences, city bylaw infractions, liquor licensing, trespassing laws, pre-trial hearings and cases covered by the Mental Health Act.

    In the past eight days, Ontario judges have heard two cases of judicial misconduct involving justices of the peace.

    The first was an appeals court decision that ultimately overturned a traffic conviction.

    The higher court ruled that “the march to conviction was unstoppable and the defence was being chastised for wasting the court’s time in insisting on his right to a trial,” the judge wrote.

    The justice of the peace was “biased against the defence,” whose case was “being sacrificed on the alter of expediency,” according to the ruling.

    In the second incident, a judicial review council is prepared to reprimand a long-standing justice of the peace whose admitted misconduct included denying a man a fair trial and throwing out 68 cases en masse because a city prosecutor was 71 seconds late for a hearing.

    Neither justice will lose their job.

    Since 1990, when the disciplinary Justice of the Peace Review Council was first established, only a handful of justices have been removed for misconduct, ranging from sexual abuse of a minor to repeated abuses of power.

    When the Ontario legislature returns this fall, the NDP critic for the attorney general’s ministry will consider tabling a bill that would require all 345 of the province’s full-time justices of the peace to have some legal background before they’re appointed to the bench.

    A similar bill was tabled in 2012 by Liberal MPP David Orazietti. The bill would have changed the existing Justice of the Peace Act so that only lawyers who had been practising for five years or more could be considered for appointment as presiding justices.

    That bill died when the legislature was prorogued in the fall.

    “I think having a law degree would be an absolute minimum,” said Jagmeet Singh, the New Democrat MPP for Bramlea-Gore-Malton. “I think a justice of the peace should actually be a lawyer, should have that legal background and understand the principles involved and the impact of a decision.”

    Often the decisions from the bench with the biggest effects are not the provincial court pronouncements of innocence or guilt, but rulings on whether or not to grant bail before a criminal trial, Singh said.

    “A justice of the peace makes a decision on the liberty of an individual charged with a criminal offence. That determination is one of the most important determinations in the cycle of a criminal allegation, and it often has a significant impact on whether or not someone will eventually be determined to be innocent or guilty,” Singh said.

    “People who are released from custody on bail are more likely to be able to prove themselves innocent than those who are detained in custody,” he added.

    University of Toronto law professor Peter Rosenthal said many people who are denied bail will actually plead guilty to a charge just to get it over with, rather than linger in custody until trial.

    “My view is that they should be lawyers,” Rosenthal said of the justices of the peace. “They play a very important role in the criminal justice system in many ways, in particular with respect to bail — and that’s a very, very important aspect of the criminal justice system.”

    Attorney General Madeleine Meilleur turned down the Star’s request for an interview on this story. The Progressive Conservatives’ attorney-general critic, Sylvia Jones, was travelling and unable to provide comment, according to her office.

    In March, the former Liberal attorney general, John Gerretsen, appointed 21 new justices of the peace to the bench, each earning a salary of $123,804 plus pension, benefits and 22 vacation days per year.

    Fewer than half of them have a law degree.

    The other 12 appointees boast credentials ranging from journalist to paralegal to soccer referee, according to the Ontario government website.

    A justice of the peace is only required to have a university degree, college diploma or equivalent two-year certificate, plus 10 years of full-time work or volunteerism in any field.

    A judge, by comparison, must have been a practising lawyer for at least 10 years before appointment to the bench.

    Anyone with the minimal qualifications can register at one of several regional “base courts” to put their name in the running for a justice of the peace position. The attorney general then compiles a list of top choices and sends it to the Justice of the Peace Appointments Advisory Committee for approval. The committee then reviews and returns the list to the attorney general to make the final decision.

    Canadian Editorial/Opinion Newswatch

    Warning: MagpieRSS: Failed to parse RSS file. (> required at line 9, column 321) in D:\Hosted Sites\canadaka.net\www\includes\rss_fetch\rss_fetch.inc on line 238 Submit News to CKA News What you need to know Friday in Toronto: News, weather and events
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:24:07 EDT

    Weather and Traffic:

    Friday will be a beautiful day in Toronto with a mix of sun and cloud and a high of 26C.

    Make sure to lather on some sunscreen before going outside because UV levels will be very high, according to Environment Canada.

    The good weather will extend into the evening with a light breeze and a low of 16C. There is a 60 per cent chance of showers overnight into Saturday.

    TTC and Go Transit were not reporting any major delays and flights in and out of Pearson and Billy Bishop Airport are running on schedule. Air Canada resumed flights to Tel Aviv Thursday evening. That flight had to circle around Ben Gurion Airport Friday morning as the airport was shelled by rocket fire just when it was due to land.

    The 505 Dundas streetcar in both directions is diverted via McCaul St. to College St., before turning on Bathurst St. due to construction at Dundas and Spadina Sts.. Until Aug. 31, the 510 Spadina streetcar will be replaced by buses with one lane open in each direction.

    Events:

  • The Beaches International Jazz Festival continues through the rest of week until July 27. Concerts are held at the Woodbine Park and along a two kilometre stretch of Queen St. E. — the Beaches’ main street. Queen Street E. will be closed this weekend from Woodbine Ave. to Beech Ave. from 6 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. nightly. The north/south streets of Waverley Ave., Wineva Ave., and Lee Ave. will remain open throughout the evening.
  • The T & T Waterfront Night Market treats visitors to an authentic Asian night market experience with a range of Asian street foods and vendors from across the province. It starts Friday from 6 p.m. to 12 a.m. and runs through the rest of the week. It is at Port Lands at 222 Cherry St. It costs $3 to get in.
  • Taste of Toronto begins Thursday at Fork York from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and runs through the rest of the weekend. The event gives people a chance to engage top chefs and enjoy live food demonstrations.
  • The Toronto Burlesque Festival returns Thursday and continues throughout the weekend. Emerging and established artists will showcase their talent at various venues across the city. Visit the website for more information.
  • Toronto’s Festival of Beer begins Friday at 4 p.m. and runs until Sunday. The annual event takes place at Bandshell Park, Exhibition Place, and celebrates Canada’s rich brewing history by featuring more than 300 brands from around the world and many Ontario craft brewers. Tickets cost between $40 and $49.
  • Summer means festivals for beer enthusiasts

  • For more events visit the city’s official website.
  • Top headlines:

  • Five Canadians, including a couple, their two children and a mother of three, were aboard the Air Algerie flight that crashed in Mali, West Africa, Thursday. The flight from Burkina Faso to Algiers was carrying 116 passengers, the majority of whom are French. It’s not clear what caused the crash, but bad weather is believed to be a factor.
  • The Toronto Blue Jays beat the Boston Red Sox 8-0 Thursday afternoon earning three wins in the four-game series. Starting pitcher Marcus Stroman gave up just one hit in seven innings of work.
  • Three members of an Irish republican group were detained and denied entry to Canada at Pearson International Airport on Wednesday, according to a newspaper in Northern Ireland. The men, said to be on a six-day speaking tour, were members of the 32 County Sovereignty Movement (32 CSM), a fringe republican organization.
  • A town in southern Manitoba recently discovered a ban on alcohol sales, which has existed as long as anyone can remember, was never actually put into law. It’s something residents have always just assumed was official.
  • MPPs living within relatively easy driving distance of Queen’s Park are spending tens of thousands of taxpayer dollars a year to live in Toronto, according to information released Thursday on MPPs travel expenses and accommodation.
  • Did you know?

    Toronto’s average summer water production is enough to fill the Rogers Centre to the top every single day, according to the City of Toronto.

    A look back:

    On July 25, 1969, parliament amends the Official Languages Act to declare English and French the official languages of Canada. The principals of act were broadened and enshrined in Canada’s constitution in 1982 through the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms.

    Submit News to CKA News Rocket fire targets Tel Aviv airport just as Air Canada flight due to land
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:28:00 EDT

    An Air Canada flight from Toronto to Tel Aviv, Israel, was forced to circle above Ben Gurion International Airport after reports the airport was targeted by three rockets Friday.

    Al-Qassam Brigades, Hamas’ military arm, confirmed via Twitter that it had fired three M75 missiles at the airport around 11:45 a.m. local time.

    An Israeli military spokesperson confirmed to Al Jazeera that rockets were fired towards the airport from the Gaza Strip.

    A number of online flight trackers showed flight AC84 circling over Israel several times before landing safely at 12:07 p.m.

    A phone call to Air Canada early Friday morning was not immediately returned.

    It comes three days after Air Canada joined U.S. and European airlines in suspending flights to Israel after a rocket landed near Tel Aviv airport on Tuesday.

    Air Canada promptly cancelled the daily route from Toronto to Tel Aviv shortly after the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration ordered all U.S. airlines to suspend flights to Tel Aviv for 24 hours. The directive was extended Wednesday and Air Canada followed suit.

    Thursday evening’s departure from Toronto was Air Canada’s first flight after resuming operations to Israel. It departed Pearson International Airport shortly after 6 p.m.

    Germany’s two largest airlines have not yet resumed flights to Israel even though the European Aviation Safety Agency has lifted its recommendation that airlines avoid flying to Tel Aviv airport.

    Air Berlin told the Associated Press that flights to Tel Aviv remain suspended until at least midday Friday, while Lufthansa said all flights to the airport on Friday have been cancelled because of ongoing security concerns.

    With files from the Associated Press.

    Submit News to CKA News From Peru, with love ? the Mike Duffy story
    Fri, 25 Jul 2014 06:00:00 EDT

    He was a dashing former war correspondent turned popular TV personality, covering breaking national news in the capital of a mysterious northern land called Canada.

    She was an ex-employee of the Peruvian Navy, recently released from an Ontario women’s prison after smuggling drugs — unwittingly, she says — aboard a flight from South America.

    They met, they fell in love — or something like it — and the rest is either a cringe-inducing chronicle of unsafe sex involving a man who should have known better, or else an epic tale of longing and passion that’s worthy of a Latin American soap opera or telenovela.

    In Lima, they seem to be taking the telenovela approach.

    Behold Peruvian TV’s melodramatic take on the amorous adventures of Mike Duffy and Yvette Benites, also starring their putative Peruvian-Canadian love child — a.k.a. Karen Duffy — whose long, heartfelt search for the man she believes to be her biological father provides the main plot motor for a story Peruvians are calling Mi Padre el Senador — My father, the senator.

    That is the title of a Peruvian mini-epic that aired Sunday night on Punto Final, a weekly newsmagazine on TV station Frecuencia Latina in Lima.

    Accompanied by countless portentous drum rolls, the documentary charts a decades-long tale of indiscretion, desire and denial that is by now familiar to most Canadians ever since the story broke earlier this month by Maclean’s magazine.

    It centres on Duffy, of course — the disgraced former senator who turned a longtime gig as a much-admired TV interviewer into a lucrative spot on the Conservative side of the Canadian parliament’s upper house. Unfortunately, he got himself into money trouble along the way and now faces 31 criminal charges related to his Senate expenses.

    Duffy has declared himself innocent on all counts, a response that parallels his initial reaction to allegations he is the father of an unacknowledged Peruvian daughter, now 32, whose full name is Karen Duffy Benites and who lives with her businessman husband and their three young daughters in La Molina, an upscale neighbourhood of Lima.

    The woman recently launched a paternity suit in the Superior Court of Lima in hopes of proving Duffy is her father, after years of sending him plaintive emails without receiving a reply.

    It would be an exaggeration to say the Mike Duffy love scandal is the top news story in Peru these days, but many newspapers and other news outlets are covering the tale, and tens of thousands of limenos — as residents of the capital are known — are now familiar with two Canadians, just one of whom is named Bieber.

    Twelve minutes long, the documentary tells a tale of thwarted love and lingering silence, a romance that began well but went awry.

    Thanks to a shared connection to Duffy’s sister, Moira, the Canadian newsman and the young Peruvian ex-con spoke on the phone one day while both were living in Ottawa — she in a halfway house following her release from jail. This was in the early 1980s.

    “He said, ‘You have a beautiful voice,’ ” Benites tells reporter Fabricio Escajadillo. “What are you doing later on?”

    According to the Peruvian program’s slightly overwrought version, what followed was “three months of passionate relations in the cold of Canada.”

    It all ended on a grim day, while Duffy was travelling out of town, when Benites was informed she would be deported within 24 hours.

    She never saw or heard from her Canadian paramour again.

    In the months that followed, she sent him cards, letters, photos, even cassettes with recordings of her infant daughter’s cries. But Duffy never wrote back, she says.

    Later, her daughter took up the task of uniting with a man the Peruvian documentary inaccurately identifies as “one of the richest” politicians in Canada.

    Karen Duffy tells the show’s reporter she has no monetary interest in seeking contact with Duffy.

    “I want him to know,” she says, “and to turn his head to see that here in Peru, in a country where he never imagined it, there is a piece of him. That is me, and I am waiting for him.”

    The narrator ends the documentary with a poignant thought.

    “Who would have said that, after a career filled with denunciations and dark moments, in the faraway land of Peru, there exists a woman who wants to give Mike Duffy a hug?”

    Who indeed?

    Submit News to CKA News Two charged after search finds cocaine, hashish, marijuana and crystal meth
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:16:40 EDT

    Two suspects from Caledon have been charged in connection with a drug investigation after Caledon OPP and members from the Drug Enforcement Unit recovered various substances at a home in the Village of Bolton.

    Authorities executed a search warrant on July 11 and found what they believe to be cocaine, hashish, marijuana and crystal meth. According to a press release, police also recovered a quantity of cash at the home.

    Zachary Malcolm Allen, 21, was arrested and charged with trafficking, possession for the purpose of trafficking, and three counts of possession for two different classifications of drugs.

    Cassandra Goncalves, 19, was arrested and charged with trafficking and possession for the purpose of trafficking.

    Allen has already appeared in court and Goncalves is scheduled to appear in August.

    Submit News to CKA News Justices of the peace play vital role in courts ? often without a law education
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:54:03 EDT

    They preside over some of the heaviest legal caseloads in the country, ruling innocence or guilt as many as 60 times per day.

    For most Ontarians, a justice of the peace is the closest thing to a judge they will see. Yet, unlike a judge, no legal experience or education is required to be one.

    They decide who gets bail and whose homes police search. They preside over traffic offences, city bylaw infractions, liquor licensing, trespassing laws, pre-trial hearings and cases covered by the Mental Health Act.

    In the past eight days, Ontario judges have heard two cases of judicial misconduct involving justices of the peace.

    The first was an appeals court decision that ultimately overturned a traffic conviction.

    The higher court ruled that “the march to conviction was unstoppable and the defence was being chastised for wasting the court’s time in insisting on his right to a trial,” the judge wrote.

    The justice of the peace was “biased against the defence,” whose case was “being sacrificed on the alter of expediency,” according to the ruling.

    In the second incident, a judicial review council is prepared to reprimand a long-standing justice of the peace whose admitted misconduct included denying a man a fair trial and throwing out 68 cases en masse because a city prosecutor was 71 seconds late for a hearing.

    Neither justice will lose their job.

    Since 1990, when the disciplinary Justice of the Peace Review Council was first established, only a handful of justices have been removed for misconduct, ranging from sexual abuse of a minor to repeated abuses of power.

    When the Ontario legislature returns this fall, the NDP critic for the attorney general’s ministry will consider tabling a bill that would require all 345 of the province’s full-time justices of the peace to have some legal background before they’re appointed to the bench.

    A similar bill was tabled in 2012 by Liberal MPP David Orazietti. The bill would have changed the existing Justice of the Peace Act so that only lawyers who had been practising for five years or more could be considered for appointment as presiding justices.

    That bill died when the legislature was prorogued in the fall.

    “I think having a law degree would be an absolute minimum,” said Jagmeet Singh, the New Democrat MPP for Bramlea-Gore-Malton. “I think a justice of the peace should actually be a lawyer, should have that legal background and understand the principles involved and the impact of a decision.”

    Often the decisions from the bench with the biggest effects are not the provincial court pronouncements of innocence or guilt, but rulings on whether or not to grant bail before a criminal trial, Singh said.

    “A justice of the peace makes a decision on the liberty of an individual charged with a criminal offence. That determination is one of the most important determinations in the cycle of a criminal allegation, and it often has a significant impact on whether or not someone will eventually be determined to be innocent or guilty,” Singh said.

    “People who are released from custody on bail are more likely to be able to prove themselves innocent than those who are detained in custody,” he added.

    University of Toronto law professor Peter Rosenthal said many people who are denied bail will actually plead guilty to a charge just to get it over with, rather than linger in custody until trial.

    “My view is that they should be lawyers,” Rosenthal said of the justices of the peace. “They play a very important role in the criminal justice system in many ways, in particular with respect to bail — and that’s a very, very important aspect of the criminal justice system.”

    Attorney General Madeleine Meilleur turned down the Star’s request for an interview on this story. The Progressive Conservatives’ attorney-general critic, Sylvia Jones, was travelling and unable to provide comment, according to her office.

    In March, the former Liberal attorney general, John Gerretsen, appointed 21 new justices of the peace to the bench, each earning a salary of $123,804 plus pension, benefits and 22 vacation days per year.

    Fewer than half of them have a law degree.

    The other 12 appointees boast credentials ranging from journalist to paralegal to soccer referee, according to the Ontario government website.

    A justice of the peace is only required to have a university degree, college diploma or equivalent two-year certificate, plus 10 years of full-time work or volunteerism in any field.

    A judge, by comparison, must have been a practising lawyer for at least 10 years before appointment to the bench.

    Anyone with the minimal qualifications can register at one of several regional “base courts” to put their name in the running for a justice of the peace position. The attorney general then compiles a list of top choices and sends it to the Justice of the Peace Appointments Advisory Committee for approval. The committee then reviews and returns the list to the attorney general to make the final decision.

    Submit News to CKA News MPPs in commuter towns spending thousands on Toronto accommodations
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:41:25 EDT

    MPPs living within relatively easy driving distance of Queen’s Park are spending tens of thousands of taxpayer dollars a year to live in Toronto.

    Annual members’ expenses for travel and Toronto accommodation (2013-14) that were released Thursday show MPPs from places as close as Barrie, Hamilton and Cambridge are spending as much as $22,000 each a year on housing allowance so they don’t have to drive or take the GO train to work — the same trip that thousands of commuters do every day.

    Who’s collecting a housing allowance

    The regulations allow MPPs to collect a housing allowance for lodging when they live more than 50 kilometres from the legislature, but some MPPs are now suggesting it may be time to review the distance requirement — especially since night sittings are rare.

    Tory MPP Christine Elliott (Whitby-Oshawa) could claim for a downtown apartment — as 16 of her legislative colleagues in a similar situation do — but refuses to be any different from her constituents.

    “I recognize that most of my constituents take the GO train everyday and they commute so I should be no different,” Elliott, who charged just over $5,000 for travelling between home and the legislature, told the Star.

    MPPs living within commuter distance are spending about $500,000 on Toronto accommodations.

    Liberal House Leader Yasir Naqvi said he looks forward to the legislature’s Board of Internal Economy discussing whether the allowance rule should be reopened. The board is responsible for money spent by the legislature and by the MPPs.

    “Perhaps this issue will come up to be discussed.”

    NDP Leader Andrea Horwath (Hamilton Centre), who has a Toronto apartment, noted that there are seldom night sittings, which was one of the reasons in past years to justify the home away from home paid for by taxpayers.

    “I think it important to look at these things and see if they are still relevant,” she said.

    Veteran Progressive Conservative MPP Ernie Hardeman (Oxford) drives 330 km round trip from his home near Woodstock each day when the house is sitting. However, he charged more than $17,000 for travelling between his home and Queen’s Park.

    “I enjoy being home every night,” said Hardeman, who leaves home at 4:45 a.m. to beat the traffic.

    The housing allowance made headlines last fall when it was reported that then Thornhill MPP Peter Shurman was charging for a Toronto residence because he had moved to Niagara-on-the-Lake. The issue ended when Shurman, who insisted he had followed all the rules, later decided to quit and the Ontario government closed a long-standing loophole that enabled MPPs to receive housing allowances even if their ridings were close to Queen’s Park.

    Tory house leader Steve Clark (Leeds-Grenville) said whether an MPP needs to have a place to stay in Toronto depends a great deal on what extra duties they might have.

    The 107 MPPs spent $2.7 million on travel and Toronto accommodation expenses for 2013-14 and another $28 million on office and support staff expenses, according to the annual report.

    Submit News to CKA News Judge deeply affected by meeting shooting victims? families ? and cops who pulled the trigger
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 20:00:28 EDT

    When the call came last August, retired Supreme Court of Canada justice Frank Iacobucci knew the task that lay ahead was challenging, highly complex and laden with controversy.

    He knew examining the issue of police use of force against people in crisis was going to be, at times, emotional — but underestimated just how much meeting all affected parties would in turn affect him.

    “You can read about a death, and you can read about tragedy,” Iacobucci said in an interview with the Star on Thursday afternoon. “But when you hear it from those who are directly affected, the impact is just much greater. It really made an impact on me.”

    A 77-year-old judge with a reputation for fairness and balance, Iacobucci outlined his much-anticipated report Thursday, advocating a broad range of changes including improved training, more emphasis on de-escalation techniques, a pilot project increasing the availability of Tasers, and cameras worn on officers’ bodies.

    The list of 84 recommendations was based on nearly a year’s worth of research, consultation of 1,200 documents, and more than 100 interviews, including with four families of people killed by police and three officers involved in a fatal encounter.

    Iacobucci and members of his Toronto legal firm, Torys, also participated in ride-alongs with the Toronto police Mobile Crisis Intervention Teams, with Iacobucci spending several hours with a unit in East York.

    “I thought, ‘These are good people, they are experienced people,’ ” he said of the Toronto police officer and psychiatric nurse on the team.

    Near the end of his address to a packed room at police headquarters Thursday, Iacobucci’s emotions began to show through, his lip curling and voice strained when he acknowledged the relatives of those killed by police.

    “For those killed, and their families, nothing can take away their loss,” he said at the press conference.

    Iacobucci stressed that the research process revealed an equally detrimental effect on an officer involved in a fatal encounter. Self-doubt and guilt are just some of the consequences, he said, alongside their mental health being put in “significant jeopardy.”

    “The life that is lost, and the lives that are affected, is the real humanity aspect of all this,” he said. “And that was an eye-opener.”

    Submit News to CKA News Three responses to Gaza: despair, cynicism, (maybe) hope: Salutin
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:30:00 EDT

    Writing in these pages, Dr. Gabor Maté expressed the sense of despair around Gaza exquisitely. That’s exquisite as in painful. Speaking as a writer who’s written on this for 35 years, and still hopes to find lifelong Jewish friends among my readers, I’ve never found communication so hard. I don’t mean agreement, I mean the simple ability to engage among people of goodwill.

    This despair is greater regarding Jews in Canada than in the U.S., where a limited but perceptible critique of Israeli policy has emerged not just on the “left” but in the mainstream. There’s nothing parallel here. Stephen Harper seems to have recruited the self-identified Jewish vote (which doesn’t mean all Jews) with a blanket call to support anything Israel does. I have no idea why that works so effectively in Canada.

    Our local despair obviously pales compared to despair in Israel/Palestine. It’s been a cliché to say Jewish criticism thrives in Israel, compared to here. But that’s now less true. When Jewish vigilantes kidnapped an innocent Palestinian teen and burned him alive, there was wide disapproval but not the stark horror one might expect given the images that come to mind (Jews burned at the stake by the Inquisition, or gassed). Something has shifted in Israeli discourse. Dehumanization sets in insidiously, not just of the Other but of oneself.

    It’s also a cliché that anyone’s who’s lived the experience of many Palestinians could easily (though not necessarily) become a terrorist in response. Israeli leaders like Moshe Dayan and Ehud Barak said it explicitly. This week a 17-year-old Gazan emerging, literally, from the rubble, told Reuters, “I once dreamt of becoming a doctor. Today I am homeless. They should watch out for what I could become next.” What I find amazing in his words is they aren’t just a threat, they sound like a plea: Please don’t let this happen to me.

    Cynicism comes readily. When the U.S. Senate voted unanimously, 100-0, to back Israel’s version, was there no one — Elizabeth Warren, Bernie Sanders — who knew it was idiotic? But rather than deal with electoral threats from the Jewish-Israel lobby that would follow, plus charges of anti-Semitism, they cynically went along. Like Secretary of State John Kerry on Fox News one-sidedly condemning Hamas, but on a live mike before the show sarcastically mentioning Israel’s “pinpoint” targeting and saying “we’ve got to get over there” to stop it.

    I actually see this as “constructive” cynicism, which may simply show how desperate you can be for positive signs. Kerry and Obama seem to feel there’s no point arguing with Israel, so just agree with what they say and try to improve things anyway, ignoring your own words. Hamas, too, has their somewhat cynical calculation: they reject an immediate ceasefire, which Israel accepts. For Israel a ceasefire means “quiet for quiet”: back to normal life and no more rockets. For Gaza it means back to the “slow death” of blockade, insufficient medicine and food, no free movement — so they say No, which means continuing slaughter under Israeli attack. It’s a horrible choice but it’s not insane — or totally cynical. It’s the kind of decision you might make in an insane situation.

    For hope, maybe, there’s Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish, the Gaza doctor whose three eldest daughters were killed by Israeli shells during the 2008-9 invasion. He’s now in Toronto with his five surviving kids. He lives by the words, I Shall Not Hate. (It’s his book’s title.) You go to his house for dinner and there aren’t just strong-willed Palestinians. There are proud Jewish Zionists, some of whom accompanied Stephen Harper on his solidarity trip to Israel. You think: this is the recipe for a train wreck. But somehow, due to Izzeldin’s fierce, almost intimidating commitment to non-violence and dialogue, people do talk.

    This may matter beyond just being nice to see. Israel isn’t apartheid South Africa: a clearly unjust situation to almost everyone. Here, the “sides” are equal in numbers and the moral balance doesn’t tilt as self-evidently as it did there. So finding a way to talk may be a practical necessity. It won’t solve the impasse; that’ll require other pressures. But it could, surprisingly, play a crucial role.

    Rick Salutin's column appears Friday. ricksalutin@ca.inter.net

    Submit News to CKA News Tax agency says ?preventing poverty? not allowed as goal for charity
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 19:16:28 EDT

    OTTAWA—The Canada Revenue Agency has told a well-known charity that it can no longer try to prevent poverty around the world, it can only alleviate poverty — because preventing poverty might benefit people who are not already poor.

    The bizarre bureaucratic brawl over a mission statement is yet more evidence of deteriorating relations between the Harper government and some parts of Canada’s charitable sector.

    The war of words began when Oxfam Canada filed papers with Industry Canada to renew its non-profit status, as required by Oct. 17 this year under a law passed in 2011.

    Ottawa-based Oxfam initially submitted wording that its purpose as a charity is “to prevent and relieve poverty, vulnerability and suffering by improving the conditions of individuals whose lives, livelihood, security or well-being are at risk.”

    The international development group, founded in 1963, spends about $32 million each year on humanitarian relief and aid in Africa, Asia, and Central and South America, with a special emphasis on women’s rights.

    But the submission to Industry Canada also needed the approval of the charities directorate of the Canada Revenue Agency, and that’s where the trouble began.

    Agency officials informed Oxfam that “preventing poverty” was not an acceptable goal.

    “Relieving poverty is charitable, but preventing it is not,” the group was warned. “Preventing poverty could mean providing for a class of beneficiaries that are not poor.”

    Oxfam Canada’s executive director called the exchange an “absurd conversation.”

    “Their interpretation was that preventing poverty may or may not involve poor people,” Robert Fox said in an interview with The Canadian Press.

    “A group of millionaires could get together to prevent their poverty, and that would not be deemed a charitable purpose.”

    The Canada Revenue Agency prevailed, and the official declaration to Industry Canada about the purposes of the non-profit corporation dropped any reference to preventing poverty.

    “Our mission statement still indicates we’re committed to ending poverty, but our charitable (purposes) do not use the word ‘end’ or ‘prevent’ — they use the word ‘alleviate.’ ”

    Philippe Brideau, spokesman for the Canada Revenue Agency, declined to provide information on the disagreement with Oxfam, saying “we do not comment on specific cases.”

    However, he said legal precedents mean charities cannot help people not already impoverished from falling into poverty.

    “Purposes that relieve poverty are charitable because they provide relief only to eligible beneficiaries, those in need,” Brideau said in an email.

    “However, the courts have not found the risk of poverty as being equivalent to actually being in need. Therefore, as the courts have indicated, an organization cannot be registered with the explicit purpose of preventing poverty.”

    He added that charities are still allowed to teach money management, budgeting and other life skills, which could lead to the prevention of poverty.

    Oxfam Canada was singled out for criticism earlier this year by Employment Minister Jason Kenney over the group’s opposition to Israeli settlements in the West Bank.

    And in July last year, Oxfam Canada signed a joint letter to Prime Minister Stephen Harper, taking issue with reports that government officials had been asked to compile “friend and enemy stakeholder” lists to brief new ministers after the summer cabinet shuffle.

    Fox said despite the new “purpose” statement, the group’s programs and activities have not changed.

    The contretemps is yet more evidence of frosty relations between the Harper government and some charities, several dozen of which have been targeted since 2012 for audits of their “political activities.”

    The Canada Revenue Agency, armed with $13 million in special funding, is auditing some 52 groups, many of which have criticized the Harper government’s programs and policies, especially on the environment.

    The list includes Amnesty International Canada, the David Suzuki Foundation, Canada Without Poverty, and the United Church of Canada’s Kairos charity.

    Pen Canada, a Toronto charity that advocates for freedom of speech, joined the ranks of the audited just this week. The group has raised alarms about the government’s muzzling of scientists on the public payroll.

    Charities have said the CRA campaign is draining them of cash and resources, creating a so-called “advocacy chill” as they self-censor to avoid aggravating auditors or attracting fresh audits. Auditors have the power to strip a charity of its registration, and therefore its ability to issue income-tax receipts, potentially drying up donations.

    Oxfam Canada is not undergoing a political-activities audit, said Fox.

    Chantal Havard, spokeswoman for the Canadian Council for International Co-operation, a coalition of international-aid charities that includes Oxfam, said she was not aware of any other members in mission-statement disputes with the CRA.

    Submit News to CKA News Peacemaking through film and pastrami: Caplansky's signs on to sponsor Toronto Palestine Film Festival
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 17:48:02 EDT

    As public opinion on the war in Gaza becomes increasingly polarized, Zane Caplansky, the owner of Toronto’s consummate Jewish deli, is trying to carve out some space in the middle.

    The popular College St. eatery has signed on to sponsor an upcoming screening of the Toronto Palestine Film Festival. Caplansky, 46, hopes it is a powerful statement, conveyed with smoked meat and rye.

    “I want to make it known that my business, which is identified as a Jewish business, is absolutely supporting Palestinian causes,” he said. “That would maybe make Palestinians understand that it’s not black and white, and maybe make Jewish people understand that it’s not black and white.”

    The intensifying conflict in the Middle East has recently ratcheted up tensions in Toronto, which is home to large Jewish and Palestinian communities.

    This week in Thornhill, police were twice called to the scene of hateful graffiti, which included a swastika and “F--- Israel” in one location, and the words “F--- Gaza” and “Arabs go home” in another.

    Caplansky, who describes his position as “anti-war,” said he has been struck by the “disgusting” and “brutal” nature of status updates on Facebook, which has become a magnet for extreme views.

    “There’s a war going on. Hundreds of people have been killed,” he said. “You can’t tell me something positive is going to come out of it.”

    Seeking to inject some calm into the discussion, he chose this week to announce his support for the film festival’s outdoor screening in Christie Pits Park on Aug. 8.

    “Caplansky’s Deli is sponsoring the Palestinian Film Festival,” he posted on the social media site on Wednesday.

    Within 24 hours, his matter-of-fact post had garnered more than 150 “likes” and dozens of positive comments.

    “The path to peace is through breaking bread … with spicy mustard and pastrami,” one friend offered.

    Others simply called him a “mensch.”

    Dania Majid, a programmer for the Toronto Palestine Film Festival, said she is touched by Caplansky’s public display of support.

    “It’s a heartwarming gesture, and I know it’s coming from a good place,” she said. “Palestinian solidarity is not based on religion or ethnic background. It’s based on the principle of human rights for all … Everyone who supports that universal principle is welcome and part of this, whether they be Jewish or other.”

    Caplansky’s desire to find common ground traces back to high school, when as president of York Mills Collegiate, he visited the home of the school’s vice-president, who was Palestinian.

    “He had a map of Israel on the wall, and it said, ‘Palestine,’” he recalled. “I realized he has a different perspective, and we can still be friends.”

    He said he made the decision several months ago to supply the film festival with one of his signature blue-and-white food trucks, emblazoned with the slogan, “Sometimes you just have to Jew it up.” (“I’m not sure how well that’s going to go over,” he said, with a laugh.)

    On offer during the screening of Laila’s Birthday, a dark comedy by Palestinian director Rashid Masharawi, will be a selection of the Caplansky classics: smoked meat sandwiches; barbecue brisket; smoked meat poutine; maple beef bacon doughnuts.

    “I hope they eat. I hope they enjoy,” Caplansky said. “I hope they understand that we’re in this together. This isn’t us and them. This is just us.”

    Submit News to CKA News Sea lets go of its Lego, reluctantly
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:47:40 EDT

    As nautical disasters go, the trouble of the Tokio Express off the coast of Cornwall is a teensy, tiny affair.

    Severe gales hit the Halifax-bound ship on Feb. 13, 1997, rocking it 60 degrees in one direction and then a hard 40 degrees to the other side.

    That was enough to dislodge 62 steel containers holding cigarette lighters, wheelbarrow wheels and 4,756,940 pieces of plastic Lego, which crashed through a hatch cover and through railings into the churning waters more than 30 kilometres off Lands End, at the tip of the southwest coast of England.

    The Lego armada included nautical-themed rafts, sea grass, scuba gear, pirates, pirate ship riggings, deep sea divers and octopi, as well as witches, dragons, toy policemen, outback adventurers and plastic flowers.

    You can see many of the Lego pieces, perfectly intact, on a Facebook page — Lego Lost at Sea — curated by local writer Tracey Williams from Newquay, Cornwall.

    She personally has collected between 500 and 600 pieces.

    “The dragon and the octopus are the most sought-after pieces,” Williams said in an interview.

    Some 4,200 black octopi went overboard but only three have been found, including one by Williams in a cave in Challaborough, Devon and another in Ireland.

    “There are a lot out there still somewhere,” Williams said of the elusive octopi. “Hundreds of thousands of daisies were lost but they’re tiny so quite hard to spot. Flippers are quite common.”

    How far they’ve travelled is anyone’s guess.

    She said Lego has washed up around Cornwall, Devon and Wales.

    A reader sent her a photo of a Lego flipper from Port Phillip Bay, Melbourne, Australia.

    Oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer told the Star it’s possible that flipper is from the Tokio Express.

    Ebbesmeyer noted the pieces have had 17 years to travel. Multiplying the average drift rate in the ocean by 17 “gives 43,000 miles — about twice round the earth’s equator,” Ebbesmeyer said.

    While there’s a lot of whimsy and humour on Williams’s Facebook site, she got involved with the Lego for environmental reasons, as part of a beach cleanup crew.

    There’s a long history of beach cleanups from shipping spills in the area. It has been called a “Graveyard of Ships” and spawned the rhyme, “From Pentire Point to Hartland light, A watery grave by day and night.”

    It’s also a notorious coastline where pirates and smugglers held sway through to the 19th century, using their knowledge of sheltered hideaways to their advantage.

    Now local folklore also includes stories of children in the late 1990s selling buckets of Lego dragons they found on the beach.

    Williams said she’d like to write a book on the spill one day.

    “I think the Lego highlights the whole issue of marine debris and cargo spills,” she said. “So many containers are lost at sea every year. It’s frightening how much debris washes up.”

    Submit News to CKA News Toronto police to keep sharing non-conviction records
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 14:14:29 EDT

    Toronto Police Service will continue to share non-conviction records with employers and volunteer organizations while it reviews new recommendations calling for the practice to stop, deputy chief Michael Federico said in an interview Wednesday.

    The volunteer guidelines issued last week by the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police (OACP) asks police forces to keep unproven allegations, withdrawn charges and mental health calls to 911 from being released except under exceptional circumstances.

    RELATED: Presumed guilty

    Most forces contacted by the Star say they already have or likely will adopt those recommendations.

    While the Toronto police force is studying the new rules, Federico says the police will continue releasing non-conviction incidents in so-called vulnerable sector checks issued to those seeking employment or volunteer work with the elderly, the young and the mentally challenged.

    “The mere fact that a charge wasn’t prosecuted doesn’t mean there isn’t a risk,” said Federico. “People with encounters with police may, in the mind of the employer, provide a risk indicator for their clients.”

    A theft charge against a prospective employee that didn’t result in a conviction, for example, may still be relevant to an employer who serves clients vulnerable to theft, said Federico.

    “We can’t presume that there isn’t a risk to the employer,” he said.

    Federico said the force supports the OACP guidelines in general.

    The OACP guidelines were issued amid an ongoing Star investigation documenting how the professional and personal lives of innocent Ontarians have been undermined by routine disclosures of non-conviction records.

    Everything from internal police surveillance notes on suspects to allegations dismissed in court have turned up on the police background checks of Canadians seeking employment, volunteer positions and educational opportunities.

    In many other cases, innocent Canadians never convicted of a crime have been turned back at the U.S. border for arrests and charges never proven true, the investigation has found.

    OACP is calling on the government of Ontario to introduce legislation that would compel all of the province’s 57 police forces to follow clear rules about what they can — and cannot — disclose.

    The Star reported last week that Premier Kathleen Wynn has expressed concerns about the release of non-conviction records and has asked Community Safety Minister Yasir Naqvi to investigate the issue.

    Federico said Toronto Police face unique challenges because of the volume of background checks — more than 100,000 a year — and memorandums of understanding with more than 3,000 employers and volunteer agencies requiring them to confirm the information is relevant to a bona fide job requirement and adhere to the Human Rights Code.

    “Toronto is a case study that stands separate from the normal practices in the province.”

    If the employer requires an applicant to have a vulnerable sector check, “we’ll disclose it to the applicant and invite them to have a conversation with us and, with their consent, we have a conversation with the employer,” he said. “We’ll make sure the applicant and employer understand the need for the information and the nature of the information if it’s still needed.”

    Lawyers, privacy advocates and citizens have criticized Toronto police for its release of non-conviction records which, they say, undermines the presumption of innocence.

    “That’s a public policy discussion,” said Federico. “We’re just custodians of that information. . . But since the government has insisted that those whose clients are vulnerable must do some for a risk assessment for their employees, one element of that risk assessment is the information that police possess.”

    Spokespeople with Peel Regional Police, Durham Regional Police and Hamilton police said they are already in compliance with the new guidelines and do not release non-conviction records.

    “(The new guidelines) are very congruent with our practice,” said Durham police spokesperson Dave Selby. “We’ve been one of the leaders in Ontario in calling for changes in this area.”

    A spokesperson with York Regional Police and Waterloo Regional Police said they will be signing on.

    Several others contacted by the Star said they are reviewing the new policy including the Ontario Provincial Police, Ottawa and London police services.

    “The Ottawa Police Service will review the OACP Record Checks Guideline and examine how it may differ from our current process,” the agency said in a statement. “We will also explore how changes could potentially impact our community, volunteer organizations and employers."

    London Police Chief Brad Duncan said that while the force continues to review the new rules, “I anticipate that we will support the (new) recommendations inclusive of those pertaining to the disclosure of non-conviction records.”

    Submit News to CKA News Five Canadians, including couple and their children, on board plane that crashed in Mali
    Thu, 24 Jul 2014 06:21:00 EDT

    A couple, their two children, and a mother of three — all from Quebec — were among five Canadians killed after an Air Algérie flight from Burkina Faso to Algiers crashed in West Africa early Thursday.

    The wreckage of jet was found late Thursday in a semi-desert area in Mali. There appeared to be no survivors among the 110 passengers and crew of six, according to the top military official in neighboring Burkina.

    The plane, an MD-83, took off at 1:17 a.m. Thursday from Ouagadougou, the capital of Burkina Faso, on a flight to Algeria. Air traffic controllers lost contact with the plane less than an hour later.

    Fierce thunderstorms were pounding the Sahara region where Flight 5017 would have flown, and the storms probably played a role in bringing the plane down, according to Gen. Gilbert Diendéré, chief of the general staff.

    One of the Canadian victims, 35-year-old Isabelle Prévost of Sherbrooke, Que., was a devoted mother to her three children ages five, seven and eight, said her father, Jean-Pierre Prévost.

    “It’s not going well. It’s really not a great thing to hear this news. She was coming back from Burkina Faso,” he told La Presse. “She spent 10 days there for the 50th wedding anniversary of the parents-in-law of one of her friends.”

    “We just lost our daughter, and her husband just lost his wife, and her three kids lost their mom. This is how we feel.”

    Winmalo Somda, his wife Angélique and their children, Nathanael and Arielle, left for Burkina Faso July 14. They were accompanied by Prévost and Somda’s brother, Wilfred, who is not a permanent resident of Canada.

    The Somda brothers had spent two years preparing for their parents’ 50th wedding anniversary celebration in Burkina Faso. Only Wilfred’s wife, who is pregnant, was unable to join them and stayed in Canada.

    “These are friends, brothers because they are part of my community. We’re in shock. We’re organizing ourselves to be able to take care of her (Wilfred Somda’s wife).” family friend Mamadou Sawadogo said yesterday.

    In Gatineau, Que., an employee at Hôpital de Buckingham lost his wife and his two children. Mamadou Zoungrana had not seen his family in years but the four were planning to reunite in Quebec.

    “Last night we were talking. When I saw the news, it corresponded exactly with their plane,” he said.

    Zoungrana is almost convinced he’s lost his family, but he still holds on to a little bit of hope.

    “I have hope because up to now I can’t make myself believe they died, that all my family is gone like that. I can’t get it in my head that my family, the moment they are supposed to come join me, their plane crashed.”

    The Prévost family said they have spoken with Canadian authorities on three occasions since air traffic controllers lost track of the plane over northern Mali. The information they’re getting, her father said, is the same as the news on television.

    “I feel like we’ve a good amount of support (from the Department of Foreign Affairs). We could probably get more, but we’re getting, in my opinion, what they can give,” he said. The federal government has yet to confirm the number of Canadian passengers.

    Lynne Yelich, Canada’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, said the government is aware of the reports of Canadians on board and that they are seeking more information, but that consular officials are ready to provide assistance.

    Two French fighter jets scoured the rugged north of Mali for the plane for most of Thursday before the wreckage was located in early evening about 50 kilometres from the border of Burkina Faso near the village of Boulikessi in Mail, said Diendéré.

    Diendéré is a close aide to President Blaise Compaore and head of the crisis committee set up to co-ordinate research for the plane.

    Radar images show the plane deviated from its route, Diendéré said. The vast deserts and mountains of northern Mali have been the scene of unrest by both Tuareg separatists and Islamist radicals.

    He said searchers at the crash site found human remains and burned and scattered plane wreckage.

    More than 50 French passengers were on board the plane along with 27 Burkina Faso nationals as well as citizens of a dozen other countries. The flight crew was Spanish.

    Before vanishing, the pilots sent a final message to ask Niger air control to change its route because of heavy rain in the area, said Burkina Faso Transport Minister Jean Bertin Ouedraogo.

    The Air Algérie plane crash comes after a spate of aviation disasters. Fliers around the globe have been on edge ever since Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared in March on its way to Beijing. Searchers have yet to find a single piece of wreckage from the jet with 239 people on board.

    Last week, a Malaysia Airlines flight was shot down by a surface-to-air missile while flying over a war-torn section of Ukraine. A Canadian was among the almost 300 who perished in that disaster. The back-to-back disasters involving Boeing 777s flown by the same airline were too much of a coincidence for many fliers.

    With files from The Associated Press

    Submit News to CKA News Canada?s wild digital frontier needs policing
    Wed, 09 Feb 2011 03:08:26 Z
    John Ivison: The copyright bill has a number of provisions that are far less favourable to Canada’s performers and creators, who are about to see take a big hit to their pocket-books
    Submit News to CKA News Election buzz, stale rhetoric ? Parliament has deja vu all over again
    Tue, 01 Feb 2011 11:42:28 Z
    John Ivison: If you missed Question Period Monday, don’t worry — you have a golden opportunity to miss it again Tuesday
    Submit News to CKA News Death of Personal Responsibility: Think outside the lunchbox
    Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:50:39 Z
    Neil Seeman: So what should the role of the state be in combating obesity? It’s time to think outside of the lunchbox, and try a whole new idea: healthy living vouchers, or HLVs
    Submit News to CKA News Don?t give Quebec a nickel
    Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:57:55 Z
    Jonathan Kay: If Harper says no to the Bloc's demands, he will be going to the voters as a man of principle who stood his ground on a subject far more important to this country than corporate tax rates
    Submit News to CKA News Stelmach more than a victim of changing attitudes
    Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:38:13 Z
    Kevin Libin: Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach bet the fortune of his party’s unparalleled political dynasty on a leadership strategy that failed to pan out
    Submit News to CKA News Dave Taylor a mixed blessing for fledgling Alberta Party
    Tue, 25 Jan 2011 02:34:30 Z
    Kevin Libin: The addition of former Liberal MLA Dave Taylor to the Alberta party gives it a legitimacy boost, but does the outspoken former radio personality fit with the party's post-partisan dreams?
    Submit News to CKA News Playing by China's rules
    Sun, 23 Jan 2011 19:21:17 Z
    Rex Murphy: China has reached an agreement with the Newfoundland government to begin the importation of seal and seal products into its potentially vast market. This is both very good and rare news for Newfoundland sealers
    Submit News to CKA News Canada: Nanny AND wimpy state?
    Thu, 20 Jan 2011 20:08:14 Z
    Before, there actually had to be a violent protest before public institutions caved in and cancelled controversial events. Now, a group of unhinged zealots make a couple of angry phone calls and – poof! – they silence free speech and free assembly
    Submit News to CKA News Executives probably not swayed by Liberal tax plan
    Tue, 18 Jan 2011 23:54:00 Z
    Scott Stinson: It’s a safe bet that Mr. Ignatieff did not win many converts with his tax-increase sales pitch to Canadian executives on Tuesday. This is not a great surprise
    Submit News to CKA News Conservatives missed the call for more civilized debate
    Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:58:11 Z
    Kelly McParland: The federal Conservatives’ brain trust must have been somewhere else when President Barack Obama delivered his speech in Arizona last week, calling for greater civility in political debate.
    Submit News to CKA News Harper's five years: Canadians better off, even if they don't feel it
    Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:21:36 Z
    John Ivison: Jan. 23 marks the fifth anniversary of Stephen Harper’s 2006 election victory and in early February, he will pass Lester B. Pearson’s time in office to become Canada’s 11th longest-serving Prime Minister

    Sources:

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