Canada Newswatch

The CKA Canada Newswatch is a companion to our in-house Canada News system.
The Newswatch is a collection of various Canadian news feeds in one convenient location.


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Daily Canada Newswatch

Submit News to CKA News Video: Canucks host ?Kids Only? presser at PNE
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 05:36:43 Z
The Vancouver Canucks hosted a special ‘Kids Only’ press conference at the Fair at the PNE. Kevin Bieksa, Eddie Lack and Fin were answering questions from the children and after the conference, 10 lucky kids got to meet the players.
Submit News to CKA News No start to school term as teachers continue to strike - The Nelson Daily
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 03:51:18 GMT

The Nelson Daily

No start to school term as teachers continue to strike
The Nelson Daily
Parents will once again be showing their displeasure with the two sides during a walk down Baker Street Tuesday beginning at noon from the former Exra Foods Parking lot on Baker Street. The nightmare that started in the spring continues for students, ...
Analysis: Government plan is to outlast teachersVancouver Sun
BC teachers' strike: No school year start TuesdayCBC.ca
School district issues letters to parentMaple Ridge Times
Toronto Sun -CTV News -The Globe and Mail
all 217 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Surrey teen goes online to raise cash for a new hand
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 03:38:06 Z
By Drew Daniel’s estimate, it will be either a decade or next week before his dream of having a second functioning hand will finally become reality. It will come down to the success of an online crowdsourcing effort the 18-year-old Surrey resident recently launched to help him buy a bebionic 3, a prosthetic hand that he says would change his life and ultimately that of people across B.C.
Submit News to CKA News B.C. parents forced to get resourceful
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 03:38:02 Z
With Tuesday’s traditional return to school a no-go for students, parents are busy planning to cushion the blow. “Parents are being super-resourceful,” Annemarie Tempelman-Kluit, founder of the Vancouver online parenting resource Yoyomamma.ca., said on Monday. “I’m seeing people taking alternating days off work, where the wife works from home Monday and the husband does the next day.
Submit News to CKA News Photos: Labour Day celebrations at Swangard Stadium
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 03:37:16 Z
Thousands of people attended Labour Day celebrations Monday at Swangard Stadium in Burnaby, including Jim Sinclair, president of the B.C. Federation of Labour, and Jim Iker, president of the BC Teachers´ Federation.
Submit News to CKA News U.S. carries out counterterrorism strike in Somalia
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 23:20:57 EDT

WASHINGTON—The U.S. military carried out a counterterrorism strike Monday against leaders of the militant group Al Shabab in Somalia, Pentagon officials said, although it was unclear whether the operation was successful.

Journalists in Somalia reported that suspected U.S. drones fired missiles near the port city of Barawe, a stronghold for Al Shabab. In a rare acknowledgment of its clandestine military activities in Somalia, the Pentagon said it had conducted a counterterrorism operation there, but gave no details.

“We are assessing the results of the operation and will provide additional information as and when appropriate,” Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said in a statement late Monday.

Related:

Star exclusive: Somalia’s new war order

Somali troops retake presidential palace after ‘shameful attack’ by militants

U.S. missile kills key Al Shabab commander

The Pentagon statement did not say whether the operation was limited to drone strikes or whether U.S. commandos had been present on the ground.

Nearly one year ago, on Oct. 5, Navy SEALs raided a seaside house in Barawe in an attempt to capture Abdulkadir Mohamed Abdulkadir, a Kenyan native and senior Al Shabab commander. That raid sparked a gunfight but was unsuccessful; U.S. officials said the SEALs withdrew because the risk of harming bystanders had become too great.

The Obama administration has since posted a $3-million reward for information leading to Abdulkadir’s arrest or capture. A State Department bounty notice describes him as being about 35 years old, with a thick moustache and three missing fingers on his left hand.

The U.S. government’s Voice of America news service, which broadcasts programs to Somalia, reported that a target of the attack may have been the alleged mastermind of Al Shabab’s attack on an upscale shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, in September 2013. That individual, Mukhtar Abu Zubeyr, also known as Godane, has emerged in recent years as the primary leader of Al Shabab, which means “the youth” in Arabic and has ties to Al Qaeda.

Voice of America, citing militants and African Union security sources in Somalia, reported that Godane was in the vicinity of the attack, but his fate was unknown. The broadcaster’s report could not be independently verified.

The U.S. military frequently conducts drone surveillance flights over Somalia, but airstrikes and ground raids are relatively uncommon. The Pentagon has a large drone base at Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti, which borders Somalia on the Horn of Africa. The U.S. military also flies surveillance drones over Somalia from a base in Ethiopia.

The Pentagon quietly deployed a small team of advisers to Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, in October 2013 to co-ordinate operations with African troops fighting to wrest control of the country from Al Shabab.

The deployment marked the first time regular U.S. troops have been stationed in the war-ravaged country since 1993, when two helicopters were shot down and 18 Americans were killed in the “Black Hawk Down” disaster. U.S. commandos have intermittently conducted raids and operations in the country as well, but the military has kept their activities cloaked in secrecy.

Submit News to CKA News Extra 25 cents/h won't cut it: Alberta - Toronto Sun
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 03:02:36 GMT

Toronto Sun

Extra 25 cents/h won't cut it: Alberta
Toronto Sun
Alberta minimun wage (Fotolia). Tweet. Change text size for the story; Print this story. Report an error. Related Stories. Major changes coming to foreign worker rules · Wynne's salary freeze isn't real · Temporary Foreign Workers program reform puts brakes on ...
Thousands gather for Edmonton and District Labour Council BBQ for the ...Edmonton Sun
Alberta's minimum wage increases to $10.20 on MondayCBC.ca
Public interest group says Alberta's minimum wage increase isn't enoughGlobalnews.ca
MetroNews Canada -Alberta Daily Herald Tribune
all 20 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Mississauga dad drowns trying to save son from Lake Huron - Toronto Star
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 02:50:46 GMT

Toronto Star

Mississauga dad drowns trying to save son from Lake Huron
Toronto Star
A Mississauga father of two has drowned after trying to save his 7-year-old son from a powerful current in Lake Huron over the long weekend. Tomasz Gladkowski, 39, was at the main beach in Port Albert, Ont. on Sunday afternoon when one of his sons ...
Missing Mississauga Man's Body Recovered in Lake Huron640 Toronto News
'Hero' dad drowns while saving sonToronto Sun
Mississauga father drowns while attempting to rescue sonCTV News
CBC.ca
all 25 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News U.S. military targets Islamic extremists in Somalia
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:35:20 -0400
The Pentagon says U.S. military forces have targeted the Islamic extremist al-Shabab network in an operation in Somalia.
Submit News to CKA News Man rushed to hospital after falling from back of bus - Toronto Star
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 02:34:49 GMT

CTV News

Man rushed to hospital after falling from back of bus
Toronto Star
A man was rushed to hospital with life-threatening injuries Monday morning after police said he fell from the back of a bus he had somehow attached himself to in Scarborough. The 32-year-old man was found lying on the road at Eglinton Ave. E. near ...
Man hurt trying to ride on TTC bus bumper, police sayCBC.ca
Man found injured in street fell from back of TTC bus: policeCP24 Toronto's Breaking News
Man critically hurt in ''bus-surfing'' fallNewstalk 1010
CTV News
all 14 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Toronto's mayoral race intensifies after Labour Day - Toronto Sun
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 02:26:26 GMT

Toronto Sun

Toronto's mayoral race intensifies after Labour Day
Toronto Sun
Toronto City Hall (Toronto Sun file photo). Article. Tweet. Change text size for the story; Print this story. Report an error. Related Stories. Doug Ford denies goose poop allegations against his brother. With the unofficial post-Labour Day kick off of Toronto's ...
Hundreds line up in Etobicoke to buy new Rob Ford bobbleheadCTV News
In last-minute reversal, Ford backs out of two mayoral debatesThe Globe and Mail
Mayor Rob Ford drops out of two planned debatesMetroNews Canada
OurWindsor.ca -CP24 Toronto's Breaking News
all 20 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Quebec researchers give students simple advice for happiness
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:11:00 -0400
A University of Sherbrooke professor says he has a way to combat increasing rates of anxiety and depression amongst children -- and all it takes is reminding yourself of what makes you happy.
Submit News to CKA News The power wheel of Tony Accurso
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 02:01:50 Z
The long wait is nearly over. Starting Tuesday morning at 9:30 a.m., the Charbonneau Commission — and Quebecers who choose to tune in — will hopefully begin getting answers out of a man who for years has staunchly refused to provide them.
Submit News to CKA News Celebrities hacked: How to protect your privacy
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 22:00:00 -0400
Leaked nude photos of more than 100 celebrities have many wondering how it happened and if the average person should be worried about the privacy of their online information.
Submit News to CKA News NATO to ask Canada to contribute to new rapid response force
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:50:20 EDT

OTTAWA—Canada will be asked to contribute troops and equipment to a new NATO rapid response force as the military alliance beefs up its readiness in the face of increasing Russian aggression.

With Russia stepping up its military engagement in Ukraine, leaders of the NATO military alliance — including Prime Minister Stephen Harper — are expected to approve the creation of the new, multinational fighting force when they meet starting Thursday in Wales.

On Monday, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen provided new details about the proposed force, describing it as a “spearhead” that could be deployed on just a few days’ notice.

More at thestar.com:

Canada talks tough on Ukraine, but cuts $2.7-billion from defence in 2015

Canada vows to stand firm despite Russian sanctions

“This spearhead would be provided by allies in rotation, and could include several thousand troops, ready to respond where needed with air, sea and special forces support,” Rasmussen said.

He said the new force would signal to a “potential aggressor” that NATO is prepared to respond “rapidly, if needed.”

“We do believe there is a very strong deterrent effect from having such a response force,” he told a briefing at NATO headquarters in Brussels.

Rasmussen made clear that he expected all 28 member states to pony up resources for the new force, a request that Canadian officials say they will consider.

“Canada is aware of a number of proposals for measures to enhance security and stability, in addition to enhancing the effectiveness of the alliance,” a senior official told the Star Monday.

“These measures include a rapid response force. We will consider all measures accordingly and look forward to discussions at the summit next week,” the official said.

Rasmussen said the creation of the new force was part of broader efforts to make NATO “fitter, faster and more flexible to adjust to all kinds of security challenges.

“Not because NATO wants to attack anyone. But because the dangers and the threats are more present and more visible. And we will do what it takes to defend our allies,” he said.

That’s a tacit acknowledgement that years of détente with Russia have taken their toll in the form of shrinking military budgets and diminished capabilities.

But Russia’s military moves, first in Crimea and now in eastern Ukraine, have been a wake-up call for NATO and its member nations.

Calling the two-day summit a “crucial” one in NATO’s history, Rasmussen said the aim of the high-level meeting would be to affirm the alliance’s core mission.

“We will ensure that the alliance remains ready, able and willing to defend all allies against any attack,” he told reporters at the briefing.

NATO already has a rapid response force, composed of 13,000 troops provided by the member nations and a command and control element.

But Rasmussen said this new group would be the first responders to a crisis, able to “travel light but strike hard” on just a few days notice.

To ensure the mobility of its response forces, NATO plans to stockpile equipment and supplies, command and control and logistics experts at strategic locales.

NATO is also considering upgrades to infrastructure, such as airfields and ports, to support reinforcements, improved intelligence gathering and training and regular training exercises “in more places, more often.”

Rasmussen said precise details of the new force, including the contributions from each member state, would be worked out among military planners once political leaders give their formal blessing to the strategy this week.

But he said all 28 members would be expected to contribute, either troops and military gear or logistical support, as they have done for the ongoing “reassurance measures” adopted in April in the face of Russian moves.

Those measures were launched to step up NATO’s presence in eastern Europe in the wake of Russia’s annexation of Crimea. Canada has played a role, dispatching CF-18 fighter jets first to Romania and now to Lithuania; troops to take part in military exercises; and the frigate HMCS Toronto, on patrol in the Mediterranean Sea. “This is a truly collective alliance effort in which all 28 allies contribute in one way or another,” Rasmussen said.

That contribution extends to defence spending. Rasmussen will be leaning on leaders such as Harper to boost funding earmarked for the armed forces.

Canada now spends just 1 per cent of its gross domestic product on defence, short of the NATO benchmark of 2 per cent. U.S. President Barack Obama told Harper in a telephone call on Saturday that agreement on increased defence spending is a “top priority” for him at the summit.

As Russia’s military action in Ukraine has stepped up, the war of words between leaders has increased, too.

Russian President Vladimir Putin pointedly warned the West last week that it stood ready to repel any aggression, adding that Russia’s partners “should understand it’s best not to mess with us.”

On Monday, Rasmussen said developments in Ukraine have undone years of effort to forge a strategic partnership between NATO and Russia after the end of the Cold War. He said that Russia clearly considers NATO an “adversary” and that western leaders “cannot afford to be naive.

“We don’t have any illusions. We are faced with the reality that Russia considers us an adversary and we will adapt to that situation,” he said.

Submit News to CKA News Coyne: Chaos, not separation, would have been result of Yes vote in 1995 Quebec referendum, book suggests
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 01:44:52 Z
The revelation in The Morning After, Chantal Hebert’s important new book on what would have happened had the Yes side won the 1995 referendum — or rather, what the protagonists think would have happened — is not that they had, […]
Submit News to CKA News Canadian commandos shopping for new equipment
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 01:37:32 Z
Canada’s special forces is looking for new equipment, ranging from armoured vehicles to radios.
Submit News to CKA News The Dogs of War: DND pooches to get cameras
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 01:36:37 Z
The Department of National Defence is looking to add a bit more bite to its operations and potentially help out troops in some hairy situations. DND is preparing to buy 12 canine-mounted vests and camera systems for use in training and operations, according to a tender posted on the federal government’s procurement website. “DND has a […]
Submit News to CKA News Padolsky: Misplaced monument
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 01:31:59 Z
An open letter to Prime Minister Stephen Harper
Submit News to CKA News Ottawa architect says government 'stealing' site for communism memorial
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 01:25:15 Z
A prominent Ottawa architect is accusing the federal government of "stealing" the site that's been chosen for the new Memorial to Victims of Communism.
Submit News to CKA News New Brunswick political parties focus on tourism, wages on Labour Day
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 21:23:43 -0400
Minimum wage in New Brunswick is currently $10, which is tied with Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador and the Northwest Territories for lowest in the country
Submit News to CKA News Syrian rebels issue demands for release of 45 Fijian peacekeepers
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:23:37 -0400
Fiji's military commander says Syrian rebels have issued three demands for the release of 45 Fijian peacekeepers they've held captive for five days.
Submit News to CKA News Andrew Coyne: 20 years later, the players in the Quebec referendum still haven't ... - National Post
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 01:15:33 GMT

National Post

Andrew Coyne: 20 years later, the players in the Quebec referendum still haven't ...
National Post
The revelation in The Morning After, Chantal Hébert's important new book on what would have happened had the Yes side won the 1995 referendum ? or rather, what the protagonists think would have happened ? is not that they had, almost without ...
Coyne: Chaos, not separation, would have been result of Yes vote in 1995 ...Calgary Herald

all 3 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Harsh news: popular 'Dude Chilling Park' sign stolen from East Vancouver
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 01:15:26 Z
Vancouver’s chillest green space lost its cool yet again this weekend when the Dude Chilling Park sign was stolen from Guelph Park. The mellowed-out guerrilla-art piece has been torn down, spray-painted and now stolen since it first appeared in the Mount Pleasant park in 2012, but it will be back, vowed Park Board Commissioner Sarah Blyth. “It’s unfortunate that this happened,” said Blyth. “This is a sign that was brought to us by the people."
Submit News to CKA News Less work, more play: Quebec elementary school bans homework for the year
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 21:12:22 -0400
College de Saint-Ambroise, a school of 339 students in the province?s Saguenay region, has introduced a near-complete ban on homework
Submit News to CKA News The Ex goes out with a roar
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:11:39 EDT

A jet thunders across the sky above the din of Exhibition Place as part of this year’s air show.

Its roaring trail of sound fades and then the plane reappears, knifing through the air and making conversation almost impossible.

On the ground it feels like a muggy Toronto day in July or August, except it’s Labour Day.

People have thronged to the grounds for the final day of the Ex, which is about to vanish, just like the deafening sound of the jet roaring past above — until it reappears next summer.

For now, there’s ice cream to be licked, lemonade to be slurped and fries to be munched as Torontonians celebrate this last gasp of summer.

Rosario Sortino remembers coming to the Ex as a kid and now he and his family have made it something of an annual tradition.

“I remember playing with my dad, doing the same thing that I’m doing with him,” said Sortino, who has his 2-year-old son, Gianluca at one of the midway games where you try to burst a balloon with a dart. He and his wife, Claudia, have also brought their four-month-old baby, Stefano, for his very first CNE experience.

Outside the Queen Elizabeth Theatre is an enormous line up of young people waiting to see the live stream of the League of Legends video game Championship Series North America.

Alex Gray compares the experience with going to see a sports game in person along with other fans as opposed to staying home and viewing it on TV.

E-sports is kind of a growing thing in today’s culture,” said Gray.

In the Direct Energy Centre there is a trove of treasures to be found among the international vendor stalls.

Cesar Abrenica said he’s been vending at the Ex since 1986. It started with embroidered shirts, such as those used at Philippine weddings, and expanded from there – he now also offers an exquisite collection of sea shells, among other things. The vast majority of his products come from the Phillipines

Naturally, he meets new customers but he also has people coming back.

“They come and they have loyalty. They come and they buy, old people young people.”

One of the shells on display has a price tag that reads $2,349. Abrenica explains how it does not come from the shore but has to be retrieved from below the surface of the water.

Back outside, CNE-goers make their way through a crowded corridor flanked by midway games — some bubbles float through the air. A little further on people queue up for the zip line.

David Bednar, the CNE’s general manager, said he expects when the final numbers are tallied, between 1.3 and 1.4 million people will have visited the Ex this year.

“You just know if you come here that even if you don’t seek out the entertainment, that the entertainment’s gonna find you,” said Bednar.

Submit News to CKA News After two years of hearings, Antonio Accurso will speak at inquiry Tuesday - The Globe and Mail
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 00:42:32 GMT

Toronto Star

After two years of hearings, Antonio Accurso will speak at inquiry Tuesday
The Globe and Mail
When the media started looking into the construction magnate's dealings in 2008, they found almost no publicly available images of the Montreal-area businessman. Instead, reporters relied on shots of his custom-built yacht ? featuring a hot tub, four ...
The power wheel of Tony AccursoMontreal Gazette
Ex-construction boss set to testify as Quebec corruption inquiry resumesCTV News

all 19 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Canadian military plans support 'hubs' in Arctic to speed response
Tue, 02 Sep 2014 00:23:32 Z
Faced with the high cost of operating in the Arctic, the Canadian Forces plans to develop a network of equipment stockpiles throughout the region.
Submit News to CKA News Jermain Defoe stays, Toronto FC and MLS dodge bullet
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:09:48 EDT

Jermain Defoe remains with Toronto FC today, averting an international public relations nightmare and a black mark not only on the franchise but on Major League Soccer as a whole.

But it wasn’t for lack of trying.

A handful of English Premier League suitors — Queens Park Rangers seemed to be the one constant in every sourced report — tried to pry the injured striker away from Toronto with what general manager Tim Bezbatchenko termed a “record transfer offer,” but no deal could be consummated.

It means Defoe, a dominant offensive force when healthy, will remain with TFC at least through the end of this MLS season.

“Yes,” Bezbatchenko said when asked whether Defoe wants to be with a team that showered him with unimaginable riches just five months ago.

But how much damage has been done just by the idea that Defoe would even consider leaving after such a short period of time?

It’s obvious there is some disconnect between Defoe — the centrepiece of TFC’s Bloody Big Deal $100-million remake last winter — and the franchise. That he would even entertain a chance to return to the Premier League after just five months in Toronto speaks volumes about his desire to remain with the Reds for any length of time. While Defoe has yet to speak publicly about his time with TFC and interest in staying, there have been numerous reports on both sides of the Atlantic that paint a picture of a disgruntled star who would welcome a return to a league and a life he knows well.

Even as negotiations for a transfer were breaking down before Monday’s 5 p.m. deadline, Queens Park Rangers owner Tony Fernandes was telling Sky Sports in England that “if not now, I’m sure in January something will happen” to repatriate the 31-year-old Defoe. January marks the next time team-to-team or league-to-league “transfers” of players can occur.

Even Bezbatchenko couldn’t assure fans of anything past this season.

“In the off-season people will make offers; they always do,” he said in a conference call in which he was adamant that Defoe remains “committed” to TFC.

“As of now, yes, there is no reason he wouldn’t (be with the team next spring).”

A Defoe departure Sunday, however, would have been an apocalyptic failure for both TFC and MLS, which has its hands in every player transaction league-wide.

Following on the heels of yet another coach firing — TFC whacked Ryan Nelsen on Sunday, and the franchise is now on its ninth manager in less than eight seasons — having Defoe bolt would have cemented the team’s reputation as a dysfunctional lot that can’t get anything right.

Having made such a splash by signing the former England international along with American international Michael Bradley last January, to have Defoe thumb his nose at his team and by extension the league after just five months of action would have been a disaster for the franchise’s already weak reputation.

Regardless of whether he’s with the team or not, Defoe is not guaranteed to appear in a TFC strip again because of nagging injuries that have plagued him for months. He has missed four of Toronto’s last five MLS games, was subbed off in the one he did play, and is currently in Britain getting treatment for what has been described as a groin injury or perhaps a sports hernia.

Team officials said last week it would likely be the end of September before he could play again, and if the Reds free fall down the stretch who knows if Defoe would risk further aggravating what’s close to a chronic condition if he doesn’t have to.

“We’ll decide in the next couple of weeks whether he needs surgery for it,” Bezbatchenko said.

There is no doubt that the striker makes TFC far more competitive when he’s on the pitch. He leads the team in scoring with 11 goals in the 16 games he’s played and infuses the squad with the kind of energy Bezbatchenko said was lacking when the general manager decided to sack Nelsen on Sunday.

TFC remains in the thick of the playoff chase, trying to secure the first post-season berth in franchise history. They are 9-9-6 with 10 games left and in a three-way tie with New England and Chicago for third in the Eastern Conference. The New York Red Bulls and Philadelphia Union are breathing down their necks. Five Eastern squads will qualify for the playoffs.

Submit News to CKA News Mayor Rob Ford drops out of two planned debates
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:04:37 EDT

Mayor Rob Ford has dropped out of two mayoral debates planned for this week.

This makes three debates he has skipped in less than a month.

Ford’s director of communications, Jeff Silverstein, confirmed to the Star that the mayor will not be attending a debate held by Greenwood Community Association on Tuesday or one organized by FilmOntario on Wednesday.

“Something has come up in his schedule,” said Silverstein, who declined to provide any further details on why the mayor was pulling out of the planned appearances.

“He’s not missing important debates. He’ll be taking part in all of the important debates and his positions are well known,” said Silverstein.

The other top mayoral candidates: David Soknacki, John Tory and Olivia Chow, are all scheduled to appear at both events.

The Greenwood Community Association is a resident and business association in the Danforth neighbourhood.

On Sunday, the Greenwood association tweeted: “Although @TOMayorFord shows no respect w cancel, we're excited to hear @oliviachow @DavidSoknacki @johntoryTO speak!”

According to Greenwood representative Scott Bradley, Ford’s communications staff sent the organization an “email for bailing” on Saturday, which stated “unfortunately something has come up.”

Bradley said the debate has been scheduled since Aug. 11.

“Our goal for this event from the beginning was to host a non-partisan event for the candidates to speak to the issues. We're doing that and it's his loss. So no sweat off our backs, but I think it was disrespectful to cancel on short notice,” he said.

A representative from FilmOntario did not want to comment on the matter.

Ford spent Labour Day Monday signing third edition “Robbie Bobbie” bobble head likenesses of himself for sale at his mother’s Etobicoke home. Proceeds go to charity.

In August, he skipped a debate at Heritage Toronto to attend a $300-per-person campaign fundraiser there.

There are at least 38 debates scheduled by various organizations and media outlets before the Oct. 27 municipal election.

Last week, Ford attended the Black Canadian Mayoral Forum debate, where he proclaimed himself a champion of black youth.

Ford returned to city hall in June after a stint in a drug and alcohol rehab facility.

Submit News to CKA News Ottawa to slash National Defence budget by $2.7 billion in 2015
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:04:02 EDT

OTTAWA—Stephen Harper has been one of the toughest-talking leaders throughout the Ukraine crisis, yet newly released figures show National Defence is expected to face an even deeper budget hole in the coming year than previously anticipated.

The ongoing reductions come as the prime minister is expected to resist pressure from allies at this week's NATO summit to spend substantially more on the military.

Annual spending on the military, when compared with 2011, is slated to shrink by a total of $2.7-billion in 2015, according to a briefing note prepared for the deputy defence minister.

That would be almost $300 million more than earlier internal estimates, and roughly $600 million higher than the figure defence official acknowledged last fall when they rolled out the department's renewal plan.

In addition to planned cuts under the government's strategic review, deficit reduction action plan and wage-restraint measures, defence is expected to face "other planning pressures," according to a Sept. 16, 2013 memo.

Those pressures include, among other things, severance for laid-off civilians at defence; the bill for the Harper government's pledge to sustain newly trained Afghan forces; and the cost of operating the Public Works secretariat that is picking a replacement for the CF-18s.

National Defence has repeatedly said that it — like other government departments — is expected to contribute toward the government's drive toward a balanced budget next year.

The issue of how much allies fork out for their militaries will be among the major closed-door topics when NATO leaders meet this week in Wales.

Canada is under pressure — mostly from the United States and Britain — to dramatically increase its defence budget over the next 10 years to meet the NATO benchmark of 2 per cent of gross domestic product.

According to the latest NATO figures, the Harper government spends 1 per cent of GDP on defence, just slightly ahead of financially troubled Spain, the Slovak Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, Lithuania and Latvia.

Only two nations surpass the benchmark — the United States and Britain. Others, such as France, Germany, Norway and Italy, come close.

Some allies, such as the Dutch, have begun to rethink planned defence cuts, especially in light of last week's military action by Russian troops in eastern Ukraine, which Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird described as an "invasion."Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird described as an "invasion."

Harper himself has left little doubt on where he believes events of the last eight months in eastern Europe belong in the grand sweep of history.

"When a major power acts in a way that is so clearly aggressive, militaristic and imperialistic, this represents a significant threat to the peace and stability of the world and it's time we all recognized the depth and the seriousness of that threat," the prime minister said at a hastily arranged photo-op with the ambassadors of Ukraine, Estonia, Poland and Latvia on April 14.

“But as I say, the most important thing we need to do is to rally all of our allies throughout the western world and throughout the greater global community to understand that peace and stability is being threatened here in a way that has not been threatened since the end of the Cold War.”

Canada's response, thus far, has been to commit CF-18s to patrolling the skies over the Baltic states; a frigate to sail with NATO's standing task force; a boost in NATO headquarters staff; and ground troops to train alongside allies. It has also sent non-lethal military equipment and aid to Ukraine.

A senior government official, speaking on background, said Canada is prepared to increase the defence budget, but described the NATO benchmark as an abstract figure and expressed concern about committing billions of extra dollars per year without a clear plan by the alliance on how it will deal with the long-term.

Dave Perry, an analyst with the Conference of Defence Associations, said in order to meet the NATO goal Ottawa would have to double the military's budget to about $38 billion per year.

Spending more doesn't necessarily mean a more effective military and Canada has demonstrated it gets a lot of efficiency out of the dollars it does commit, he said.

Financial estimates, that were part of the briefing package given to Rob Nicholson when he was sworn-in as defence minister in July 2013, show the Conservatives, despite past promises and rhetoric, weren't planning to spend much more than the roughly $18.9-billion already set aside.

In a rare display of conflicting messages, Nicholson's parliamentary secretary, James Bezan, publicly suggested last spring that the country should be spending 1.7 per cent of GDP on its military.

When the Conservatives introduced their defence strategy in 2008, they underlined how the 20-year plan would provide "stable and predictable" funding to the military by delivering a guaranteed two per cent annual increase.

But Perry said it hasn't worked out that way and, while the escalator is still there, it's been more than offset by cuts elsewhere.

"It's a bizarre situation where you've got $2.7 billion in cuts, taking away with the left hand; but with right hand your getting this escalation amount," Perry said.

The Canada First Defence Strategy also promised that overseas missions would be paid for — as other nations do — through a special budgetary appropriation and not taken out of the departmental budget.

The war in Afghanistan was largely funded that way, but Nicholson's briefing papers show other deployments, notably the 2011 bombing campaign in Libya and the Afghan training mission, were not.

Submit News to CKA News After two years of hearings, Antonio Accurso will speak at inquiry Tuesday
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 20:01:03 -0400
The Charbonneau Commission is now winding down, and to this day, the public has heard more from Antonio Accurso, construction magnate, through police wiretaps broadcast at the inquiry than from the 62-year-old himself. But all that is about to change
Submit News to CKA News U.S. lawyer joins legal team for Jamaican killed in police custody
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:58:00 -0400
A U.S. civil rights lawyer said Monday that she is volunteering her time to help represent relatives of a slain Jamaican man whose death in custody has amplified distrust of the Caribbean country's police force among many islanders.
Submit News to CKA News Federal government balks at backing Arctic Internet project
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:44:55 Z
A Canadian group wants to lay an undersea Internet cable in the Northwest Passage. And it wants the federal government to be a major customer.
Submit News to CKA News Video: Richmond firefighters battle dump truck blaze
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:37:52 Z
Three dump trucks were destroyed in a suspicious fire on River Road in Richmond late Sunday night. The trucks were fully engulfed in flames when firefighters arrived about 11:30 p.m. at the Bill Power Trucking lot behind Rusty’s tow yard in the 15700-block River Road.
Submit News to CKA News Doubts cast over rehab centre?s anglo claims
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:37:36 Z
Critics are accusing the current administrators of the Constance-Lethbridge Rehabilition Centre of manipulating figures in order to claim that less than 50 per cent of its patients are English-speaking.
Submit News to CKA News Alley converted to local produce market
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:37:32 Z
In an effort to reclaim dirty alleyways, Montreal’s downtown commercial association has brought a new side-street market to Ste-Catherine St. — and its chances of expansion already look promising.
Submit News to CKA News Student was booted from bar: Kissed another man - Toronto Sun
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:36:48 GMT

Toronto Sun

Student was booted from bar: Kissed another man
Toronto Sun
Kicked out of bar (Fotolia). Tweet. Change text size for the story; Print this story. Report an error. Related Stories. Media too quick with homophobia label · Seguin's 'no homo' tweet ignites firestorm · Same sex and the conservatives · Rob Ford attends Rainbow ...
Montreal bar makes amends after homophobia chargeAldergrove Star
St Denis bar owner fights back after anti-gay accusationsCJAD
Bar to examine complaint about homophobiaMontreal Gazette

all 30 news articles »
Submit News to CKA News Foreign medical grad finds Ontario system tough to crack
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:33:29 EDT

Anupam Apu is good enough to be an immigrant but not a doctor.

He is one of more than 6,000 international medical graduates in Ontario dealing with the daily frustration of knowing their chances of becoming practising doctors are slim to none.

The 36-year Bangladesh native thought that when he ticked the box for general physician as a preferred career on his immigration application, he would have a chance to continue in his field.

But both Apu and his wife, Homayra Ferdous, also a medical graduate from Bangladesh, soon found the deck was stacked against them because of the limited number of international medical graduates certified annually for medical residency positions in Ontario.

Before leaving for Canada almost four years ago, Apu said he was in the early stages of training in neurosurgery.

“It is discouraging actually,” he said in an interview, outlining the roadblocks in a system that “definitely” looks down on medical graduates from his country, even though he says his medical degree is recognized in England.

Apu’s story resonates for “a lot of folks out there,” said Ontario fairness commissioner Jean Augustine.

She has been urging the Liberal government to consider a “practice ready assessment” system similar to the ones in Alberta and Newfoundland, where foreign-trained doctors get a provisional licence and work under supervision to determine their level of competence.

“We have made that recommendation to government . . . but I don’t think anybody is listening,” Augustine said.

Apu is frustrated as well. “If a person could be assessed in a workplace, then it would be much easier for that person to get into the system.”

Augustine’s dismay with the current system of certifying foreign-trained doctors follows an announcement earlier in the week in which the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario reported the highest number yet of international medical graduates being certified for full practice or residency.

But Augustine noted the college failed to mention the majority of the 200 provincially funded residency positions are going to Canadian students who trained abroad and returned to launch their careers, which she said was never the program’s intent.

Even so, Health Minister Eric Hoskins said: “We are working hard to train more Ontarians to be doctors and to attract doctors from across the country and around the world . . . The number of international medical graduate residency spots in Ontario has more than doubled, from 90 to 200.”

Apu, who graduated with a bachelor of medicine and surgery, said he and his wife made inquiries soon after arriving but quickly learned it would cost $4,000 or more to take four exams before being able to apply to the international medical graduate program. And even then there were no guarantees.

“They virtually told me not to pursue as a general surgeon because there were almost (no positions). So spending all that money and then with no guarantee I would get it didn’t sound nice to me,” Apu said. In the meantime he and his wife have decided to take exams to get into a U.S. residency program.

“It is a very level playing field (in the U.S.),” said Apu, who works as an assistant to a family physician in a practice where he says just about all the other doctors completed their residencies in other provinces.

Despite Ontario’s seemingly impervious system, Apu said he still feels there is a place for him and will write the eligibility exams if he can find the money.

“I do want to keep my channels open everywhere,” he said.

Foreign-trained doctors coming to Canada often end up with a “sense of betrayal,” said Tanya Chute Molina, a program adviser in the fairness commissioner’s office.

“The system for skilled immigration sends the message that doctors or other professionals are wanted and needed, and that there will be jobs available, so (applicants) don’t anticipate the challenges with licensing.”

Submit News to CKA News He just needs a (robotic) hand: B.C. teen crowdfunds for state-of-the-art prosthetic
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:30:35 +0000
Surrey, B.C., teenager Drew Daniel is asking the Internet to buy him a new hand
Submit News to CKA News Whistler loses visitors as jobs go unfilled
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:30:21 Z
OTTAWA — Whistler, Canada’s busiest and highest-profile ski resort by far, could be an unintended casualty of the Harper government’s crackdown on its Temporary Foreign Workers program, according to an “urgent” appeal issued this week. The resort is losing clients from around the world, and restaurants in Whistler Village are struggling to find staff to handle the coming seasonal rush, the Whistler Chamber of Commerce said in a letter to Employment Minister Jason Kenney that was provided Friday to The Vancouver Sun.
Submit News to CKA News Full-day kindergarten: good investment or just good politics?
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:15:00 -0400
Researchers have mixed views on whether universal early learning programs pay dividends in children?s later achievements
Submit News to CKA News What we know about full-day kindergarten
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 19:14:53 -0400
There have been some consistent findings about how young children benefit from early learning
Submit News to CKA News Rob Anders draws flak in renewed hunt for Conservative nomination
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:09:33 EDT

CALGARY—Controversial Conservative MP Rob Anders may not find the welcome mat out as he attempts to make the move from a big-city riding where he lost his nomination to a brand new rural one.

Earlier this year, Anders lost a bitterly fought nomination battle in Calgary Signal Hill, which takes in a large part of the constituency that he has represented in Ottawa for 17 years.

He is now seeking the Conservative nomination in the riding of Bow River east of Calgary. It covers a large swath of southern Alberta, including the communities of Strathmore, Brooks, Taber and Vauxhall.

Anders’s entry into the race has residents talking and is causing some resentment, says Brooks Mayor Martin Shields, who is one of three other candidates seeking the nomination.

“I was not happy and not pleased,” Shields said in a recent interview. “If you lose your own nomination in your own riding, I think it’s a message that maybe running somewhere else, where you’re not from, is not something you should do.

“When there was a drop-in candidate, it became more apparent that we really need to have somebody local run.”

Rolly Ashdown, a reeve in Rocky View County, is also seeking the nomination in a vote expected the third week of September.

“I’ve heard that from a lot of people. I think the basics are they’d like to see someone local,” he said. “It does make a difference being from here. It gives you familiarity, that’s for sure.”

Candidate Gerard Lucyshyn, a former Mount Royal University economics professor, agrees.

“If he wants to try his hand again, I guess that’s up to him. Most people that I’ve spoken to in the riding have indicated they want somebody local and somebody that is in the community and lives here and shares the same interest,” said Lucyshyn, who lives in Langdon.

Anders has not responded to four requests for comment from The Canadian Press, but in a news release announcing his plan to run, he said he shares many of the same views as his potential constituents. Anders said he now lives in Chestermere, a town just east of Calgary that is within the new riding.

“There is a lot of work to do in Ottawa: personal-property and gun rights that need protecting; taxes that need cutting; and family values that need to be fought for,” he said. “The new riding of Bow River shares these values and I would be honoured to represent it in Ottawa.”

When Anders appeared at a fair in Brooks last month, it did not go unnoticed by one of his Conservative caucus colleagues.

“Just heard that Rob Anders MP-Calgary told a crowd on Saturday in Brooks, he was the MP for this area. FYI — Rob I am still the MP,” Medicine Hat MP LaVar Payne said on Twitter at the time.

A waiver from the Conservative party is required when a candidate has been defeated in one nomination race and wants to run again. The party did not respond to a request for an interview on whether Anders has been granted the waiver. The party also hasn’t responded to a request for a list of candidates.

That issue hasn’t stopped the campaigning.

Recently, the Wildrose party, Alberta’s right-leaning official Opposition, received a number of complaints after robocalls went out from a former Wildrose leader endorsing Anders.

“He has openly supported me and the Wildrose party for years on the provincial scene,” Paul Hinman said in the call.

It prompted current leader, Danielle Smith, to issue a statement clarifying that the Wildrose is not endorsing Anders. One of her members of the legislature from the area did the same.

Conservative party officials chastised Anders during the Calgary race last March for what they said were misleading phone calls that might have left the impression they had come from his rival Ron Liepert. Liepert ended up winning the nomination.

Anders is known for his strong social conservative views and gained attention for his sometimes inflammatory statements, including his opposition to granting honorary citizenship to Nelson Mandela, branding the South African leader a communist and a terrorist.

Anders once compared the 2008 Beijing Olympics to the 1936 Berlin Games, which were held when Germany was under the control of Adolf Hitler.

He faces an uphill battle, suggested David Taras, a political scientist from Mount Royal University.

“The problem is he’s not a local and, if there is a strong local candidate that has profile, then he really becomes the outsider,” said Taras. “He’s bringing the baggage of his defeat. He’s been defeated, he was defeated by a lot of the people who presumably knew him best.

“Once you have the image of someone who has lost and can’t hold your own riding — and then you say, ‘OK, elect me’ — I think that’s really hard.”

Submit News to CKA News Canadian Lancaster warplane ? one of only two remaining ? effectively stranded in U.K. after engine failure
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 23:06:45 +0000
Although the 20-metre-long aircraft performed a forced landing without incident, witnesses saw the bomber trailing smoke
Submit News to CKA News Military base to become second federal data centre
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 22:50:24 Z
CFB Borden will become home to a second federal data centre.
Submit News to CKA News Crowded homes, violence form barriers to education
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 22:32:58 Z
Stéphane Fortin’s 8-year-old son emerges from his bedroom and sprints out the front door into a clearing across the street. The week before, the boy managed to skip all of his classes.
Submit News to CKA News As the price of beef rises, ranchers turn to genetic testing to ensure their beef is buttery, researcher says
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 22:24:55 +0000
'It?s not your grandfather?s agriculture anymore,' says Reynold Bergen. 'It?s a really expensive and competitive business'
Submit News to CKA News ?Ethically, this seems to me the right thing to do': Wrenching suicide of B.C. woman with dementia spurs euthanasia debate
Mon, 01 Sep 2014 22:10:09 +0000
Facing the ravages of dementia, Bennett made her way to a favoured spot near her home on Bowen Island and took a lethal dose of barbiturates
Submit News to CKA News U.K.?s Cameron wants passports seized of suspected terrorists
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:10:07 EDT

LONDON—Prime Minister David Cameron on Monday proposed new laws that would give police the power to seize the passports of Britons suspected of having travelled abroad to fight with terrorist groups.

Speaking to Parliament, Cameron said his government is also working on plans to block such suspected British jihadi fighters from re-entering the U.K. The power to monitor such suspects who are already in Britain would also be strengthened.

The plans to widen Britain’s anti-terror laws, which are likely to be approved by parliament, are aimed at preventing attacks by Islamist militants returning from terror training in trouble spots in the Middle East.

Like other Western countries such as the U.S., France and Germany, Britain is worried that citizens who travel abroad to join terror groups could threaten their home country when they return.

Intelligence and security services suspect that around 500 Britons have gone to fight in Syria and potentially Iraq. Cameron has described the extremism posed by the Islamic State group as the biggest security threat of modern times — surpassing that of Al Qaeda — and said it poses a direct threat to Europe.

Britain’s Home Secretary already has the authority to withhold passports in some cases, but Cameron said more is needed to ensure police at border crossings could act in time when they spot a suspect.

“We will introduce specific and targeted legislation to fill this gap by providing the police with a temporary power to seize a passport at the border, during which time they will be able to investigate the individual concerned,” he said.

Authorities on Friday raised Britain’s terror threat alert from “substantial” to “severe,” the second-highest level, in response to the crises in Iraq and Syria and concerns that terrorist groups could target Europe. The alert means that an attack on Britain is “highly likely” — though the government did not provide information to suggest an attack was imminent.

Canadian Editorial/Opinion Newswatch

Warning: MagpieRSS: Failed to parse RSS file. (Undeclared entity error at line 56, column 54) in D:\Hosted Sites\canadaka.net\www\includes\rss_fetch\rss_fetch.inc on line 238 Submit News to CKA News U.S. carries out counterterrorism strike in Somalia
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 23:20:57 EDT

WASHINGTON—The U.S. military carried out a counterterrorism strike Monday against leaders of the militant group Al Shabab in Somalia, Pentagon officials said, although it was unclear whether the operation was successful.

Journalists in Somalia reported that suspected U.S. drones fired missiles near the port city of Barawe, a stronghold for Al Shabab. In a rare acknowledgment of its clandestine military activities in Somalia, the Pentagon said it had conducted a counterterrorism operation there, but gave no details.

“We are assessing the results of the operation and will provide additional information as and when appropriate,” Rear Adm. John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said in a statement late Monday.

Related:

Star exclusive: Somalia’s new war order

Somali troops retake presidential palace after ‘shameful attack’ by militants

U.S. missile kills key Al Shabab commander

The Pentagon statement did not say whether the operation was limited to drone strikes or whether U.S. commandos had been present on the ground.

Nearly one year ago, on Oct. 5, Navy SEALs raided a seaside house in Barawe in an attempt to capture Abdulkadir Mohamed Abdulkadir, a Kenyan native and senior Al Shabab commander. That raid sparked a gunfight but was unsuccessful; U.S. officials said the SEALs withdrew because the risk of harming bystanders had become too great.

The Obama administration has since posted a $3-million reward for information leading to Abdulkadir’s arrest or capture. A State Department bounty notice describes him as being about 35 years old, with a thick moustache and three missing fingers on his left hand.

The U.S. government’s Voice of America news service, which broadcasts programs to Somalia, reported that a target of the attack may have been the alleged mastermind of Al Shabab’s attack on an upscale shopping mall in Nairobi, Kenya, in September 2013. That individual, Mukhtar Abu Zubeyr, also known as Godane, has emerged in recent years as the primary leader of Al Shabab, which means “the youth” in Arabic and has ties to Al Qaeda.

Voice of America, citing militants and African Union security sources in Somalia, reported that Godane was in the vicinity of the attack, but his fate was unknown. The broadcaster’s report could not be independently verified.

The U.S. military frequently conducts drone surveillance flights over Somalia, but airstrikes and ground raids are relatively uncommon. The Pentagon has a large drone base at Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti, which borders Somalia on the Horn of Africa. The U.S. military also flies surveillance drones over Somalia from a base in Ethiopia.

The Pentagon quietly deployed a small team of advisers to Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia, in October 2013 to co-ordinate operations with African troops fighting to wrest control of the country from Al Shabab.

The deployment marked the first time regular U.S. troops have been stationed in the war-ravaged country since 1993, when two helicopters were shot down and 18 Americans were killed in the “Black Hawk Down” disaster. U.S. commandos have intermittently conducted raids and operations in the country as well, but the military has kept their activities cloaked in secrecy.

Submit News to CKA News NATO to ask Canada to contribute to new rapid response force
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:50:20 EDT

OTTAWA—Canada will be asked to contribute troops and equipment to a new NATO rapid response force as the military alliance beefs up its readiness in the face of increasing Russian aggression.

With Russia stepping up its military engagement in Ukraine, leaders of the NATO military alliance — including Prime Minister Stephen Harper — are expected to approve the creation of the new, multinational fighting force when they meet starting Thursday in Wales.

On Monday, NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen provided new details about the proposed force, describing it as a “spearhead” that could be deployed on just a few days’ notice.

More at thestar.com:

Canada talks tough on Ukraine, but cuts $2.7-billion from defence in 2015

Canada vows to stand firm despite Russian sanctions

“This spearhead would be provided by allies in rotation, and could include several thousand troops, ready to respond where needed with air, sea and special forces support,” Rasmussen said.

He said the new force would signal to a “potential aggressor” that NATO is prepared to respond “rapidly, if needed.”

“We do believe there is a very strong deterrent effect from having such a response force,” he told a briefing at NATO headquarters in Brussels.

Rasmussen made clear that he expected all 28 member states to pony up resources for the new force, a request that Canadian officials say they will consider.

“Canada is aware of a number of proposals for measures to enhance security and stability, in addition to enhancing the effectiveness of the alliance,” a senior official told the Star Monday.

“These measures include a rapid response force. We will consider all measures accordingly and look forward to discussions at the summit next week,” the official said.

Rasmussen said the creation of the new force was part of broader efforts to make NATO “fitter, faster and more flexible to adjust to all kinds of security challenges.

“Not because NATO wants to attack anyone. But because the dangers and the threats are more present and more visible. And we will do what it takes to defend our allies,” he said.

That’s a tacit acknowledgement that years of détente with Russia have taken their toll in the form of shrinking military budgets and diminished capabilities.

But Russia’s military moves, first in Crimea and now in eastern Ukraine, have been a wake-up call for NATO and its member nations.

Calling the two-day summit a “crucial” one in NATO’s history, Rasmussen said the aim of the high-level meeting would be to affirm the alliance’s core mission.

“We will ensure that the alliance remains ready, able and willing to defend all allies against any attack,” he told reporters at the briefing.

NATO already has a rapid response force, composed of 13,000 troops provided by the member nations and a command and control element.

But Rasmussen said this new group would be the first responders to a crisis, able to “travel light but strike hard” on just a few days notice.

To ensure the mobility of its response forces, NATO plans to stockpile equipment and supplies, command and control and logistics experts at strategic locales.

NATO is also considering upgrades to infrastructure, such as airfields and ports, to support reinforcements, improved intelligence gathering and training and regular training exercises “in more places, more often.”

Rasmussen said precise details of the new force, including the contributions from each member state, would be worked out among military planners once political leaders give their formal blessing to the strategy this week.

But he said all 28 members would be expected to contribute, either troops and military gear or logistical support, as they have done for the ongoing “reassurance measures” adopted in April in the face of Russian moves.

Those measures were launched to step up NATO’s presence in eastern Europe in the wake of Russia’s annexation of Crimea. Canada has played a role, dispatching CF-18 fighter jets first to Romania and now to Lithuania; troops to take part in military exercises; and the frigate HMCS Toronto, on patrol in the Mediterranean Sea. “This is a truly collective alliance effort in which all 28 allies contribute in one way or another,” Rasmussen said.

That contribution extends to defence spending. Rasmussen will be leaning on leaders such as Harper to boost funding earmarked for the armed forces.

Canada now spends just 1 per cent of its gross domestic product on defence, short of the NATO benchmark of 2 per cent. U.S. President Barack Obama told Harper in a telephone call on Saturday that agreement on increased defence spending is a “top priority” for him at the summit.

As Russia’s military action in Ukraine has stepped up, the war of words between leaders has increased, too.

Russian President Vladimir Putin pointedly warned the West last week that it stood ready to repel any aggression, adding that Russia’s partners “should understand it’s best not to mess with us.”

On Monday, Rasmussen said developments in Ukraine have undone years of effort to forge a strategic partnership between NATO and Russia after the end of the Cold War. He said that Russia clearly considers NATO an “adversary” and that western leaders “cannot afford to be naive.

“We don’t have any illusions. We are faced with the reality that Russia considers us an adversary and we will adapt to that situation,” he said.

Submit News to CKA News The Ex goes out with a roar
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 21:11:39 EDT

A jet thunders across the sky above the din of Exhibition Place as part of this year’s air show.

Its roaring trail of sound fades and then the plane reappears, knifing through the air and making conversation almost impossible.

On the ground it feels like a muggy Toronto day in July or August, except it’s Labour Day.

People have thronged to the grounds for the final day of the Ex, which is about to vanish, just like the deafening sound of the jet roaring past above — until it reappears next summer.

For now, there’s ice cream to be licked, lemonade to be slurped and fries to be munched as Torontonians celebrate this last gasp of summer.

Rosario Sortino remembers coming to the Ex as a kid and now he and his family have made it something of an annual tradition.

“I remember playing with my dad, doing the same thing that I’m doing with him,” said Sortino, who has his 2-year-old son, Gianluca at one of the midway games where you try to burst a balloon with a dart. He and his wife, Claudia, have also brought their four-month-old baby, Stefano, for his very first CNE experience.

Outside the Queen Elizabeth Theatre is an enormous line up of young people waiting to see the live stream of the League of Legends video game Championship Series North America.

Alex Gray compares the experience with going to see a sports game in person along with other fans as opposed to staying home and viewing it on TV.

E-sports is kind of a growing thing in today’s culture,” said Gray.

In the Direct Energy Centre there is a trove of treasures to be found among the international vendor stalls.

Cesar Abrenica said he’s been vending at the Ex since 1986. It started with embroidered shirts, such as those used at Philippine weddings, and expanded from there – he now also offers an exquisite collection of sea shells, among other things. The vast majority of his products come from the Phillipines

Naturally, he meets new customers but he also has people coming back.

“They come and they have loyalty. They come and they buy, old people young people.”

One of the shells on display has a price tag that reads $2,349. Abrenica explains how it does not come from the shore but has to be retrieved from below the surface of the water.

Back outside, CNE-goers make their way through a crowded corridor flanked by midway games — some bubbles float through the air. A little further on people queue up for the zip line.

David Bednar, the CNE’s general manager, said he expects when the final numbers are tallied, between 1.3 and 1.4 million people will have visited the Ex this year.

“You just know if you come here that even if you don’t seek out the entertainment, that the entertainment’s gonna find you,” said Bednar.

Submit News to CKA News Jermain Defoe stays, Toronto FC and MLS dodge bullet
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:09:48 EDT

Jermain Defoe remains with Toronto FC today, averting an international public relations nightmare and a black mark not only on the franchise but on Major League Soccer as a whole.

But it wasn’t for lack of trying.

A handful of English Premier League suitors — Queens Park Rangers seemed to be the one constant in every sourced report — tried to pry the injured striker away from Toronto with what general manager Tim Bezbatchenko termed a “record transfer offer,” but no deal could be consummated.

It means Defoe, a dominant offensive force when healthy, will remain with TFC at least through the end of this MLS season.

“Yes,” Bezbatchenko said when asked whether Defoe wants to be with a team that showered him with unimaginable riches just five months ago.

But how much damage has been done just by the idea that Defoe would even consider leaving after such a short period of time?

It’s obvious there is some disconnect between Defoe — the centrepiece of TFC’s Bloody Big Deal $100-million remake last winter — and the franchise. That he would even entertain a chance to return to the Premier League after just five months in Toronto speaks volumes about his desire to remain with the Reds for any length of time. While Defoe has yet to speak publicly about his time with TFC and interest in staying, there have been numerous reports on both sides of the Atlantic that paint a picture of a disgruntled star who would welcome a return to a league and a life he knows well.

Even as negotiations for a transfer were breaking down before Monday’s 5 p.m. deadline, Queens Park Rangers owner Tony Fernandes was telling Sky Sports in England that “if not now, I’m sure in January something will happen” to repatriate the 31-year-old Defoe. January marks the next time team-to-team or league-to-league “transfers” of players can occur.

Even Bezbatchenko couldn’t assure fans of anything past this season.

“In the off-season people will make offers; they always do,” he said in a conference call in which he was adamant that Defoe remains “committed” to TFC.

“As of now, yes, there is no reason he wouldn’t (be with the team next spring).”

A Defoe departure Sunday, however, would have been an apocalyptic failure for both TFC and MLS, which has its hands in every player transaction league-wide.

Following on the heels of yet another coach firing — TFC whacked Ryan Nelsen on Sunday, and the franchise is now on its ninth manager in less than eight seasons — having Defoe bolt would have cemented the team’s reputation as a dysfunctional lot that can’t get anything right.

Having made such a splash by signing the former England international along with American international Michael Bradley last January, to have Defoe thumb his nose at his team and by extension the league after just five months of action would have been a disaster for the franchise’s already weak reputation.

Regardless of whether he’s with the team or not, Defoe is not guaranteed to appear in a TFC strip again because of nagging injuries that have plagued him for months. He has missed four of Toronto’s last five MLS games, was subbed off in the one he did play, and is currently in Britain getting treatment for what has been described as a groin injury or perhaps a sports hernia.

Team officials said last week it would likely be the end of September before he could play again, and if the Reds free fall down the stretch who knows if Defoe would risk further aggravating what’s close to a chronic condition if he doesn’t have to.

“We’ll decide in the next couple of weeks whether he needs surgery for it,” Bezbatchenko said.

There is no doubt that the striker makes TFC far more competitive when he’s on the pitch. He leads the team in scoring with 11 goals in the 16 games he’s played and infuses the squad with the kind of energy Bezbatchenko said was lacking when the general manager decided to sack Nelsen on Sunday.

TFC remains in the thick of the playoff chase, trying to secure the first post-season berth in franchise history. They are 9-9-6 with 10 games left and in a three-way tie with New England and Chicago for third in the Eastern Conference. The New York Red Bulls and Philadelphia Union are breathing down their necks. Five Eastern squads will qualify for the playoffs.

Submit News to CKA News Mayor Rob Ford drops out of two planned debates
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:04:37 EDT

Mayor Rob Ford has dropped out of two mayoral debates planned for this week.

This makes three debates he has skipped in less than a month.

Ford’s director of communications, Jeff Silverstein, confirmed to the Star that the mayor will not be attending a debate held by Greenwood Community Association on Tuesday or one organized by FilmOntario on Wednesday.

“Something has come up in his schedule,” said Silverstein, who declined to provide any further details on why the mayor was pulling out of the planned appearances.

“He’s not missing important debates. He’ll be taking part in all of the important debates and his positions are well known,” said Silverstein.

The other top mayoral candidates: David Soknacki, John Tory and Olivia Chow, are all scheduled to appear at both events.

The Greenwood Community Association is a resident and business association in the Danforth neighbourhood.

On Sunday, the Greenwood association tweeted: “Although @TOMayorFord shows no respect w cancel, we're excited to hear @oliviachow @DavidSoknacki @johntoryTO speak!”

According to Greenwood representative Scott Bradley, Ford’s communications staff sent the organization an “email for bailing” on Saturday, which stated “unfortunately something has come up.”

Bradley said the debate has been scheduled since Aug. 11.

“Our goal for this event from the beginning was to host a non-partisan event for the candidates to speak to the issues. We're doing that and it's his loss. So no sweat off our backs, but I think it was disrespectful to cancel on short notice,” he said.

A representative from FilmOntario did not want to comment on the matter.

Ford spent Labour Day Monday signing third edition “Robbie Bobbie” bobble head likenesses of himself for sale at his mother’s Etobicoke home. Proceeds go to charity.

In August, he skipped a debate at Heritage Toronto to attend a $300-per-person campaign fundraiser there.

There are at least 38 debates scheduled by various organizations and media outlets before the Oct. 27 municipal election.

Last week, Ford attended the Black Canadian Mayoral Forum debate, where he proclaimed himself a champion of black youth.

Ford returned to city hall in June after a stint in a drug and alcohol rehab facility.

Submit News to CKA News Ottawa to slash National Defence budget by $2.7 billion in 2015
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 20:04:02 EDT

OTTAWA—Stephen Harper has been one of the toughest-talking leaders throughout the Ukraine crisis, yet newly released figures show National Defence is expected to face an even deeper budget hole in the coming year than previously anticipated.

The ongoing reductions come as the prime minister is expected to resist pressure from allies at this week's NATO summit to spend substantially more on the military.

Annual spending on the military, when compared with 2011, is slated to shrink by a total of $2.7-billion in 2015, according to a briefing note prepared for the deputy defence minister.

That would be almost $300 million more than earlier internal estimates, and roughly $600 million higher than the figure defence official acknowledged last fall when they rolled out the department's renewal plan.

In addition to planned cuts under the government's strategic review, deficit reduction action plan and wage-restraint measures, defence is expected to face "other planning pressures," according to a Sept. 16, 2013 memo.

Those pressures include, among other things, severance for laid-off civilians at defence; the bill for the Harper government's pledge to sustain newly trained Afghan forces; and the cost of operating the Public Works secretariat that is picking a replacement for the CF-18s.

National Defence has repeatedly said that it — like other government departments — is expected to contribute toward the government's drive toward a balanced budget next year.

The issue of how much allies fork out for their militaries will be among the major closed-door topics when NATO leaders meet this week in Wales.

Canada is under pressure — mostly from the United States and Britain — to dramatically increase its defence budget over the next 10 years to meet the NATO benchmark of 2 per cent of gross domestic product.

According to the latest NATO figures, the Harper government spends 1 per cent of GDP on defence, just slightly ahead of financially troubled Spain, the Slovak Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, Lithuania and Latvia.

Only two nations surpass the benchmark — the United States and Britain. Others, such as France, Germany, Norway and Italy, come close.

Some allies, such as the Dutch, have begun to rethink planned defence cuts, especially in light of last week's military action by Russian troops in eastern Ukraine, which Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird described as an "invasion."Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird described as an "invasion."

Harper himself has left little doubt on where he believes events of the last eight months in eastern Europe belong in the grand sweep of history.

"When a major power acts in a way that is so clearly aggressive, militaristic and imperialistic, this represents a significant threat to the peace and stability of the world and it's time we all recognized the depth and the seriousness of that threat," the prime minister said at a hastily arranged photo-op with the ambassadors of Ukraine, Estonia, Poland and Latvia on April 14.

“But as I say, the most important thing we need to do is to rally all of our allies throughout the western world and throughout the greater global community to understand that peace and stability is being threatened here in a way that has not been threatened since the end of the Cold War.”

Canada's response, thus far, has been to commit CF-18s to patrolling the skies over the Baltic states; a frigate to sail with NATO's standing task force; a boost in NATO headquarters staff; and ground troops to train alongside allies. It has also sent non-lethal military equipment and aid to Ukraine.

A senior government official, speaking on background, said Canada is prepared to increase the defence budget, but described the NATO benchmark as an abstract figure and expressed concern about committing billions of extra dollars per year without a clear plan by the alliance on how it will deal with the long-term.

Dave Perry, an analyst with the Conference of Defence Associations, said in order to meet the NATO goal Ottawa would have to double the military's budget to about $38 billion per year.

Spending more doesn't necessarily mean a more effective military and Canada has demonstrated it gets a lot of efficiency out of the dollars it does commit, he said.

Financial estimates, that were part of the briefing package given to Rob Nicholson when he was sworn-in as defence minister in July 2013, show the Conservatives, despite past promises and rhetoric, weren't planning to spend much more than the roughly $18.9-billion already set aside.

In a rare display of conflicting messages, Nicholson's parliamentary secretary, James Bezan, publicly suggested last spring that the country should be spending 1.7 per cent of GDP on its military.

When the Conservatives introduced their defence strategy in 2008, they underlined how the 20-year plan would provide "stable and predictable" funding to the military by delivering a guaranteed two per cent annual increase.

But Perry said it hasn't worked out that way and, while the escalator is still there, it's been more than offset by cuts elsewhere.

"It's a bizarre situation where you've got $2.7 billion in cuts, taking away with the left hand; but with right hand your getting this escalation amount," Perry said.

The Canada First Defence Strategy also promised that overseas missions would be paid for — as other nations do — through a special budgetary appropriation and not taken out of the departmental budget.

The war in Afghanistan was largely funded that way, but Nicholson's briefing papers show other deployments, notably the 2011 bombing campaign in Libya and the Afghan training mission, were not.

Submit News to CKA News Foreign medical grad finds Ontario system tough to crack
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:33:29 EDT

Anupam Apu is good enough to be an immigrant but not a doctor.

He is one of more than 6,000 international medical graduates in Ontario dealing with the daily frustration of knowing their chances of becoming practising doctors are slim to none.

The 36-year Bangladesh native thought that when he ticked the box for general physician as a preferred career on his immigration application, he would have a chance to continue in his field.

But both Apu and his wife, Homayra Ferdous, also a medical graduate from Bangladesh, soon found the deck was stacked against them because of the limited number of international medical graduates certified annually for medical residency positions in Ontario.

Before leaving for Canada almost four years ago, Apu said he was in the early stages of training in neurosurgery.

“It is discouraging actually,” he said in an interview, outlining the roadblocks in a system that “definitely” looks down on medical graduates from his country, even though he says his medical degree is recognized in England.

Apu’s story resonates for “a lot of folks out there,” said Ontario fairness commissioner Jean Augustine.

She has been urging the Liberal government to consider a “practice ready assessment” system similar to the ones in Alberta and Newfoundland, where foreign-trained doctors get a provisional licence and work under supervision to determine their level of competence.

“We have made that recommendation to government . . . but I don’t think anybody is listening,” Augustine said.

Apu is frustrated as well. “If a person could be assessed in a workplace, then it would be much easier for that person to get into the system.”

Augustine’s dismay with the current system of certifying foreign-trained doctors follows an announcement earlier in the week in which the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario reported the highest number yet of international medical graduates being certified for full practice or residency.

But Augustine noted the college failed to mention the majority of the 200 provincially funded residency positions are going to Canadian students who trained abroad and returned to launch their careers, which she said was never the program’s intent.

Even so, Health Minister Eric Hoskins said: “We are working hard to train more Ontarians to be doctors and to attract doctors from across the country and around the world . . . The number of international medical graduate residency spots in Ontario has more than doubled, from 90 to 200.”

Apu, who graduated with a bachelor of medicine and surgery, said he and his wife made inquiries soon after arriving but quickly learned it would cost $4,000 or more to take four exams before being able to apply to the international medical graduate program. And even then there were no guarantees.

“They virtually told me not to pursue as a general surgeon because there were almost (no positions). So spending all that money and then with no guarantee I would get it didn’t sound nice to me,” Apu said. In the meantime he and his wife have decided to take exams to get into a U.S. residency program.

“It is a very level playing field (in the U.S.),” said Apu, who works as an assistant to a family physician in a practice where he says just about all the other doctors completed their residencies in other provinces.

Despite Ontario’s seemingly impervious system, Apu said he still feels there is a place for him and will write the eligibility exams if he can find the money.

“I do want to keep my channels open everywhere,” he said.

Foreign-trained doctors coming to Canada often end up with a “sense of betrayal,” said Tanya Chute Molina, a program adviser in the fairness commissioner’s office.

“The system for skilled immigration sends the message that doctors or other professionals are wanted and needed, and that there will be jobs available, so (applicants) don’t anticipate the challenges with licensing.”

Submit News to CKA News Rob Anders draws flak in renewed hunt for Conservative nomination
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 19:09:33 EDT

CALGARY—Controversial Conservative MP Rob Anders may not find the welcome mat out as he attempts to make the move from a big-city riding where he lost his nomination to a brand new rural one.

Earlier this year, Anders lost a bitterly fought nomination battle in Calgary Signal Hill, which takes in a large part of the constituency that he has represented in Ottawa for 17 years.

He is now seeking the Conservative nomination in the riding of Bow River east of Calgary. It covers a large swath of southern Alberta, including the communities of Strathmore, Brooks, Taber and Vauxhall.

Anders’s entry into the race has residents talking and is causing some resentment, says Brooks Mayor Martin Shields, who is one of three other candidates seeking the nomination.

“I was not happy and not pleased,” Shields said in a recent interview. “If you lose your own nomination in your own riding, I think it’s a message that maybe running somewhere else, where you’re not from, is not something you should do.

“When there was a drop-in candidate, it became more apparent that we really need to have somebody local run.”

Rolly Ashdown, a reeve in Rocky View County, is also seeking the nomination in a vote expected the third week of September.

“I’ve heard that from a lot of people. I think the basics are they’d like to see someone local,” he said. “It does make a difference being from here. It gives you familiarity, that’s for sure.”

Candidate Gerard Lucyshyn, a former Mount Royal University economics professor, agrees.

“If he wants to try his hand again, I guess that’s up to him. Most people that I’ve spoken to in the riding have indicated they want somebody local and somebody that is in the community and lives here and shares the same interest,” said Lucyshyn, who lives in Langdon.

Anders has not responded to four requests for comment from The Canadian Press, but in a news release announcing his plan to run, he said he shares many of the same views as his potential constituents. Anders said he now lives in Chestermere, a town just east of Calgary that is within the new riding.

“There is a lot of work to do in Ottawa: personal-property and gun rights that need protecting; taxes that need cutting; and family values that need to be fought for,” he said. “The new riding of Bow River shares these values and I would be honoured to represent it in Ottawa.”

When Anders appeared at a fair in Brooks last month, it did not go unnoticed by one of his Conservative caucus colleagues.

“Just heard that Rob Anders MP-Calgary told a crowd on Saturday in Brooks, he was the MP for this area. FYI — Rob I am still the MP,” Medicine Hat MP LaVar Payne said on Twitter at the time.

A waiver from the Conservative party is required when a candidate has been defeated in one nomination race and wants to run again. The party did not respond to a request for an interview on whether Anders has been granted the waiver. The party also hasn’t responded to a request for a list of candidates.

That issue hasn’t stopped the campaigning.

Recently, the Wildrose party, Alberta’s right-leaning official Opposition, received a number of complaints after robocalls went out from a former Wildrose leader endorsing Anders.

“He has openly supported me and the Wildrose party for years on the provincial scene,” Paul Hinman said in the call.

It prompted current leader, Danielle Smith, to issue a statement clarifying that the Wildrose is not endorsing Anders. One of her members of the legislature from the area did the same.

Conservative party officials chastised Anders during the Calgary race last March for what they said were misleading phone calls that might have left the impression they had come from his rival Ron Liepert. Liepert ended up winning the nomination.

Anders is known for his strong social conservative views and gained attention for his sometimes inflammatory statements, including his opposition to granting honorary citizenship to Nelson Mandela, branding the South African leader a communist and a terrorist.

Anders once compared the 2008 Beijing Olympics to the 1936 Berlin Games, which were held when Germany was under the control of Adolf Hitler.

He faces an uphill battle, suggested David Taras, a political scientist from Mount Royal University.

“The problem is he’s not a local and, if there is a strong local candidate that has profile, then he really becomes the outsider,” said Taras. “He’s bringing the baggage of his defeat. He’s been defeated, he was defeated by a lot of the people who presumably knew him best.

“Once you have the image of someone who has lost and can’t hold your own riding — and then you say, ‘OK, elect me’ — I think that’s really hard.”

Submit News to CKA News U.K.?s Cameron wants passports seized of suspected terrorists
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 18:10:07 EDT

LONDON—Prime Minister David Cameron on Monday proposed new laws that would give police the power to seize the passports of Britons suspected of having travelled abroad to fight with terrorist groups.

Speaking to Parliament, Cameron said his government is also working on plans to block such suspected British jihadi fighters from re-entering the U.K. The power to monitor such suspects who are already in Britain would also be strengthened.

The plans to widen Britain’s anti-terror laws, which are likely to be approved by parliament, are aimed at preventing attacks by Islamist militants returning from terror training in trouble spots in the Middle East.

Like other Western countries such as the U.S., France and Germany, Britain is worried that citizens who travel abroad to join terror groups could threaten their home country when they return.

Intelligence and security services suspect that around 500 Britons have gone to fight in Syria and potentially Iraq. Cameron has described the extremism posed by the Islamic State group as the biggest security threat of modern times — surpassing that of Al Qaeda — and said it poses a direct threat to Europe.

Britain’s Home Secretary already has the authority to withhold passports in some cases, but Cameron said more is needed to ensure police at border crossings could act in time when they spot a suspect.

“We will introduce specific and targeted legislation to fill this gap by providing the police with a temporary power to seize a passport at the border, during which time they will be able to investigate the individual concerned,” he said.

Authorities on Friday raised Britain’s terror threat alert from “substantial” to “severe,” the second-highest level, in response to the crises in Iraq and Syria and concerns that terrorist groups could target Europe. The alert means that an attack on Britain is “highly likely” — though the government did not provide information to suggest an attack was imminent.

Submit News to CKA News 3 children die in knife attack at Chinese elementary school
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:34:54 EDT

BEIJING—A 40-year-old man stabbed students and teachers with a fruit knife at an elementary school in central China on Monday, killing three children and injuring six other people before jumping to his death, officials said.

The attack on the first day after summer break injured five other children and one teacher at Dongfang primary school in Yunxi county in Hubei province, they said.

Two students were hospitalized with serious injuries, said Deng Yunshan, a government official in Chengguan, the township where the school is located.

The assailant jumped to his death from a fourth-floor window after the attack, Deng said.

Yunxi county's propaganda office identified the man only by his family name, Chen, and said he was a parent.

An investigation into the incident is underway, Deng said. No further details were immediately available.

China has suffered a series of attacks on kindergartens and grade schools. The culprits often are identified as mentally ill or as being angry at society.

Submit News to CKA News Eugenie Bouchard eliminated at U.S. Open
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 17:09:35 EDT

NEW YORK—From the beginning, things just seemed not quite right. Maybe it was the terrible hardcourt season Eugenie Bouchard had coming into the U.S. Open. Maybe it was the injuries that had bothered her in the weeks after Wimbledon. Or, maybe it was all in everyone’s head — including, ultimately, hers.

Bouchard’s Grand Slam season ended Monday after a 7-6 (2), 6-4 loss to Ekaterina Makarova, a top 20 journeywoman who saves some of her best efforts for the majors. Bouchard is clearly a superior player to Makarova, but here, all tournament, that didn’t matter: she never really found her groove.

“I didn’t have the highest expectations from myself for this tournament,” Bouchard admitted afterwards. “Since Wimbledon, it’s been a little bit of a struggle with nagging injuries.

“Even at the beginning of this tournament I said, ‘You know, I know I haven’t had the proper preparation, I have really cut down on practice time,’ ” she said. “That affects you in a match, especially after a few tough ones late at night.”

Her defeat — and that of Vasek Pospisil and his doubles partner, Jack Sock — meant that Milos Raonic was the only Canadian left in the tournament going into Monday’s evening session. He was facing Japan’s Kei Nishikori, the 10th seed and someone he has only defeated once. That victory came when it counted, however — as they played for a place in the Wimbledon quarter-finals.

Raonic was the second match on the big court in Arthur Ashe Stadium, which makes for a long day, but it kept him out of the debilitating heat and humidity that exhausted Bouchard and contributed to her exit.

When Bouchard and Makarova took the court, it was 30 C, the sun was beating down on the players and the humidity made the New York air feel like soup on your skin. Just sitting in the stands was incredibly uncomfortable; playing world-class tennis looked like torture.

“There’s no shade on the court, at all,” said Andy Murray, who struggled terribly with the hot weather last week and described Monday as being worse. “So if you’re out there for a few hours, it’s going to be tough.”

Bouchard started feeling dizzy and lightheaded towards the end of the first set. She was forced to take her first medical timeout of the tournament in between the fourth and fifth games of the second; an icepack was draped around her neck, trainers rubbed bags of ice up and down her legs, and medical staff tested her blood pressure and took her temperature.

There were murmurs in the crowd as fans wondered if she was done. Would she retire?

“No. I never want to retire from matches, no matter what,” Bouchard said. “I was going to play on for sure.”

After the match, the tournament’s medical staff kept her for a few hours, cooling her down with ice towels and making sure she was OK before letting Bouchard out to do interviews.

Bouchard will pocket just over $187,000 for the tournament — a good payday for just three wins, but a pittance when one considers the champion’s purse is $3 million. This year has been lucrative, though, for Bouchard: she’s earned more than $2.8 million in prize money alone.

Bouchard is the only player on tour to have made at least the fourth round at every major so far this season. She also became Canada’s first finalist at one of the big tournaments, earning a spot at Wimbledon.

But after returning from London, things took a turn. Bouchard won just one of the four matches she played in the run-up to the U.S. Open, and there were questions about whether she was ready for the New York stage. Her first-round match passed uneventfully — a 6-2, 6-1 win against an overmatched opponent — but there were serious wobbles in her next two meetings.

She looked angry, or disappointed. She lost focus. After those matches, Bouchard said she needed to work on her mental game, and there were flashes of that I-can’t-believe-this body language against Makarova. But ultimately, after her ouster, it seemed clear Bouchard needs something else: a break.

“I’m going to rest a bit now and then get to practice and, you know, really try to push it in practice so I can feel great on the match court,” she said. “I think that’s the most important thing.”

Bouchard’s skill, marketability and success this year put the focus in New York firmly on her: she was on the cover of the New York Times Magazine the weekend before the tournament started. She played two night matches in Arthur Ashe Stadium, the Open’s biggest stage (though they are a mixed blessing; Bouchard said those late contests left her somewhat drained). And on Monday, she was one of only two top 8 seeds remaining in the tournament. Now, Serena Williams stands alone.

Though she said she wasn’t anticipating great results at the Open, Bouchard acknowledged that others were, and that expectations — hers and the public’s — have grown since her success at Wimbledon.

“They changed a lot,” she said. “I definitely felt a lot of outside expectations and pressure to win matches. You know, I felt more like it’s normal if I win and it’s a bit more of a disaster when I lose.

“But that’s something that I need to block out. It’s what I have been working on,” Bouchard added. “I feel like I have been dealing with it well generally to really, you know, just go back to the basics, focus on my tennis. That is what’s gotten me to this point, so I just need to keep going on that path.”

Submit News to CKA News Montreal bar owner says male students were not kicked out for kissing
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 15:59:17 EDT

MONTREAL—A Quebec student association that had accused a popular Montreal bar of homophobia says it’s satisfied with the response from the owner.

Vincent Fournier Gosselin, an executive with the group and student at the Université de Montréal, had asked Bar Le Saint-Sulpice for an apology after a bouncer allegedly kicked out two male students for kissing.

Gosselin said the incident happened during a medical school orientation event last Friday night.

But the owner, Maurice Bourassa, told Radio-Canada the pair were acting inappropriately — regardless of their sexual orientation — and were on a fire escape, in violation of the safety code.

Bourassa says his bar, a popular spot in the city’s Latin Quarter, is open to everyone.

News of the incident spread quickly on social media and an advocacy group organized a “kiss-in” in front of the bar later this week.

In a statement Monday evening, Gosselin said he’s happy a dialogue was opened between the two sides in an attempt to clear up the situation.

More Canada news at thestar.com

Submit News to CKA News Former Canadian Nazi runs for office in Ontario?s cottage country
Mon, 1 Sep 2014 06:00:00 EDT

The man who once started the Canadian Nazi Party now lives in a little green house on Newcastle Road, in the cottage-country town of Minden. The Red Ensign flag is raised outside his porch. A white sign on the lawn advertises the paralegal business he ran until December, and spells out his name in black letters: John Beattie.

Fifty years ago, Beattie was infamous for leading Nazi rallies in Toronto that descended into violence. In 1966, hundreds of police officers had to guard the 24-year-old at Allan Gardens as he shouted anti-Semitic slogans at a mob of 1,500 protesters. At a rally three years later a protester clubbed him unconscious with a pair of binoculars.

Beattie founded the Canadian Nazi Party in 1965, and shortly after was jailed for six months for placing swastikas on the lawns of prominent Jewish residents. In 1972 he worked as an OPP informant, spying on other right-wing groups. He ran for mayor of Toronto in 1978 on a platform of white-only housing.

Today, Beattie is running for deputy reeve of the Township of Minden Hills, population 5,600. He’s quite mad about a water tower project that went over budget.

On a sunny afternoon, the 72-year-old was sitting on his porch cutting into a pork chop covered in kidney beans, explaining why white people are superior. He looked gaunt from recent health problems, and spoke with a Clint Eastwood grimace.

“We were the first in space, most of the inventions were by white people,” he said. “With our administrative abilities, the world was better off when the British ran things.”

Related stories on thestar.com:

Nazi poster child for Aryan beauty was actually Jewish

Anti-Semitic pamphlet distributed in eastern Ukraine

Beattie likes to boast that Minden is a “white village” where he can be among his own kind. In reality, he lives next door to a Mexican woman who drapes her country’s flag across her porch railing.

Anabel Briseno said she brings him a plate of food every Christmas and Thanksgiving. She knows his views, having lived beside him for 15 years, but also knows he’s lived alone since his wife died of cancer.

“I just like to share,” she said.

Suwan Khamduang, who runs the local Thai restaurant, said Beattie’s had takeout food from the restaurant multiple times, despite his claim he avoids non-white establishments.

“This kind of thing is from 100 years ago,” she said. “Why would you close your mind like that? It makes me feel sad — sad for him.”

Beattie’s return to the public spotlight brings up bad memories for longtime residents of Minden.

In 1989, shortly after Beattie moved to the town, he hosted what he called a celebration of John A. Macdonald. About 100 white supremacists gathered on his rural property while skinhead bands played. The two-day event ended with the burning of a giant cross.

“We got wind of it because of posters in Toronto,” said Jack Brezina, who then owned and edited the local newspaper, the Minden Times.

Brezina still has the editorial the paper published as a rallying cry: “As a citizen of Canada and a member of this community, I believe in the equality of all individuals regardless of race, colour, creed, religion or ethnic origin.”

In 2011, residents heard Beattie was planning another Canada Day rally, and the uproar led to its cancellation.

“It’s a slap in the face,” Brezina said of Beattie’s decision to run. “This man laid a major stain on this community back in the first rally, and tried to do it again the second time. People still say, ‘Oh, I know Minden, that’s where that rally was.’ ”

Beattie describes the six years he spent goose-stepping around Allan Gardens as misadventures fuelled by alcoholism. He maintains he was manipulated by the Canadian Jewish Congress into starting the Canadian Nazi Party, for the goal of getting hate-speech laws passed.

“With every grain of truth you can build a hill of lies,” said Bernie Farber, a former CEO of the CJC. He said the CJC had just hired a private detective to determine the group’s strength and sabotage its efforts.

Beattie has told another version of how he became a Nazi, one that doesn’t include a Jewish conspiracy. In 1972, when he first renounced Nazism, he told Star columnist Alexander Ross how he used to sit in on trials at Osgoode Hall, noticing how rich people were given lenient sentences.

The teenage Beattie had also come across anti-Semitic pamphlets written by Ron Gostick, a far-right organizer from Alberta. Later, walking by the mansions of Forest Hill, Beattie wondered whether the wealthy residents had ever worked as hard as his grandfather did, Ross wrote.

“The word ‘Jew’ just hit my head,” Beattie told Ross. “It came out of me. I didn’t say it then, but I’m telling you right now.”

Nobody the Star talked to in Minden thinks Beattie will win, but Farber said it’s a mistake to treat the candidacy as a joke.

“A deputy reeve is a serious position,” he said.

Beattie says his court work has redeemed him locally, and that his personal views are separate from his professional life.

“As a paralegal, I feel I cleaned the slate because I dealt with everybody, or the Law Society would have kicked me out,” he said. “I had no problem with Jewish judges, Jewish clients who were in the area. The people in the town know me.”

But Beattie still networks with white-rights activists around the world, using his personal website. He produces short YouTube videos, expounding the same kind of propaganda that radicalized him in his youth.

In the past few months Beattie’s done lengthy interviews with a former Ku Klux Klan leader and a self-described national socialist from Britain.

He isn’t planning on door-knocking for the municipal campaign, and says he has no money. Fifty years ago, his Nazi organizing was also done with little funding and few supporters. At least one thing has stayed constant: a lack of resources has never stopped John Beattie from stirring up hatred and conflict.

Submit News to CKA News Canada?s wild digital frontier needs policing
Wed, 09 Feb 2011 03:08:26 Z
John Ivison: The copyright bill has a number of provisions that are far less favourable to Canada’s performers and creators, who are about to see take a big hit to their pocket-books
Submit News to CKA News Election buzz, stale rhetoric ? Parliament has deja vu all over again
Tue, 01 Feb 2011 11:42:28 Z
John Ivison: If you missed Question Period Monday, don’t worry — you have a golden opportunity to miss it again Tuesday
Submit News to CKA News Death of Personal Responsibility: Think outside the lunchbox
Thu, 27 Jan 2011 14:50:39 Z
Neil Seeman: So what should the role of the state be in combating obesity? It’s time to think outside of the lunchbox, and try a whole new idea: healthy living vouchers, or HLVs
Submit News to CKA News Don?t give Quebec a nickel
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 23:57:55 Z
Jonathan Kay: If Harper says no to the Bloc's demands, he will be going to the voters as a man of principle who stood his ground on a subject far more important to this country than corporate tax rates
Submit News to CKA News Stelmach more than a victim of changing attitudes
Wed, 26 Jan 2011 03:38:13 Z
Kevin Libin: Alberta Premier Ed Stelmach bet the fortune of his party’s unparalleled political dynasty on a leadership strategy that failed to pan out
Submit News to CKA News Dave Taylor a mixed blessing for fledgling Alberta Party
Tue, 25 Jan 2011 02:34:30 Z
Kevin Libin: The addition of former Liberal MLA Dave Taylor to the Alberta party gives it a legitimacy boost, but does the outspoken former radio personality fit with the party's post-partisan dreams?
Submit News to CKA News Playing by China's rules
Sun, 23 Jan 2011 19:21:17 Z
Rex Murphy: China has reached an agreement with the Newfoundland government to begin the importation of seal and seal products into its potentially vast market. This is both very good and rare news for Newfoundland sealers
Submit News to CKA News Canada: Nanny AND wimpy state?
Thu, 20 Jan 2011 20:08:14 Z
Before, there actually had to be a violent protest before public institutions caved in and cancelled controversial events. Now, a group of unhinged zealots make a couple of angry phone calls and – poof! – they silence free speech and free assembly
Submit News to CKA News Executives probably not swayed by Liberal tax plan
Tue, 18 Jan 2011 23:54:00 Z
Scott Stinson: It’s a safe bet that Mr. Ignatieff did not win many converts with his tax-increase sales pitch to Canadian executives on Tuesday. This is not a great surprise
Submit News to CKA News Conservatives missed the call for more civilized debate
Mon, 17 Jan 2011 19:58:11 Z
Kelly McParland: The federal Conservatives’ brain trust must have been somewhere else when President Barack Obama delivered his speech in Arizona last week, calling for greater civility in political debate.
Submit News to CKA News Harper's five years: Canadians better off, even if they don't feel it
Sat, 15 Jan 2011 13:21:36 Z
John Ivison: Jan. 23 marks the fifth anniversary of Stephen Harper’s 2006 election victory and in early February, he will pass Lester B. Pearson’s time in office to become Canada’s 11th longest-serving Prime Minister

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