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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:09 pm
 


$1:
Canadians often think of themselves as less patriotic than people of other nationalities, particularly Americans.

But a four-country poll shows that with the notable exception of francophone Quebecers, Canadians are more deeply attached to their country than people in the United States, Germany or Spain.

Ninety-five per cent of Canadians outside Quebec said they are attached to their country, compared to 92% of Americans, 84% of Germans and 81% of Spaniards, according to the survey for the Association of Canadian Studies.

“I think that Canadians presume that Americans are super patriotic and have a deep sense of attachment because we think they manifest their attachment more openly than Canadians do,” said Jack Jedwab, executive director of the association.

“We think we are modest about our identification with Canada but I don’t believe that to be the case. Repeatedly, survey after survey shows that outside of Quebec, Canadians have a very deep sense of attachment to their country,” Jedwab said.

In Quebec, however, just 64% of residents are attached to Canada. When you factor that province into the national average, 87% of Canadians are attached to their country — fewer than in the U.S. but more than in Germany and in Spain.

Canadians’ attachment to their country (outside Quebec) is not only more widespread than in other countries — it is also more deeply felt, the survey indicates.

Seven out of 10 Canadians outside Quebec feel “very attached” to their country, compared to 67% of Americans, 47% of Germans and 55% of Spaniards.

Including Quebec, 58% of Canadians are very attached to Canada.

The rate of people who are very attached to Canada drops to one in four among French-speaking Quebecers. Attachment to Quebec is correspondingly high, with 66% of Quebec francophones describing themselves as very attached to their province and 27% as somewhat attached.

Quebecers are split on attachment to Canada along language lines, with Quebec anglophones showing similar rates of attachment to Canadians in the rest of the country. Ninety-three per cent of English-speaking Quebecers are attached to Canada, with 65% saying they are very attached and 28% describing themselves as somewhat attached.

High rates of attachment to Canada are “true for immigrants and non-immigrants alike, which is another wrong assumption we make,” Jedwab noted. “We tend to assume that immigrants don’t have that strong sense of attachment to Canada but in fact, they do,” he said.

Outside Quebec, 93% of allophones are attached to Canada, with 58% describing themselves as very attached and 35% as somewhat attached.

Within Quebec, 80% of allophones are attached to Canada; 41% are very attached and 39% said somewhat attached.

While Quebecers identify more closely with their province than Canadians elsewhere, Quebec is far from the only jurisdiction where allegiance to province or region is strong, the poll shows.

“In Europe, they’re a lot less likely to put that they’re from their country only,” Jedwab said. “They’re putting their province or autonomous region into the equation.”

In Spain, where the federal government has decentralized powers to 13 regional governments since 2004, 22% of those surveyed defined themselves equally by province and country while 16 per cent defined themselves by province first or only.

In Germany, nearly one-quarter of respondents defined themselves equally by their province and country while 12% defined themselves by province first or province only.

In Quebec, 31 per cent of francophones identified themselves as Quebecers only, 39 per cent as Quebecers first but also Canadian, 20 per cent as equally Quebecer and Canadian, 7% as Canadian but also Quebecer and 1% as Canadian only.

In English Canada and the United States, 17% to 18% of respondents defined themselves equally by province or state and fewer than 7% identified themselves with their province or state first or alone.

Four major market research firms, including Leger Marketing in Canada, conducted the international survey by Internet and telephone in September. The margin of error varies from one to five per cent, 19 times out of 20.

Postmedia News

mascot&montrealgazette.com



Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/news/canada ... z19cxhBsHf



$1:
But a four-country poll shows that with the notable exception of francophone Quebecers, Canadians are more deeply attached to their country than people in the United States, Germany or Spain.


For those who don't like their country... Image


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:20 pm
 


$1:
“We think we are modest about our identification with Canada but I don’t believe that to be the case. Repeatedly, survey after survey shows that outside of Quebec, Canadians have a very deep sense of attachment to their country,” Jedwab said.


We are more modest about it, doesn't mean our identification isn't deep. We just don't wear it on our sleeves and go pushing it at everybody the way Americans do.

And, I've certainly lost some identification with Canada. To me a lot of it was the sense of space, of all that empty land. Now that we seem to be giving it all away to the natives, I don't really feel it's my land as much as I used to. I seem to have less rights to it than one specific race.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:45 pm
 


It would be interesting to see how the numbers compared between the US and Canada in the era before 9/11 when fear-fuelled nationalism swept through the US. Noisy patriotism became fashionable, because if you weren't displaying the US flag on your person and in your business, and didn't know the words to "Proud to be an American" you were considered a bit suspect. It's not so scary now, but the conservatives are still very nationalistic. Add that to the general xenophobia and you get the numbers cited in the article above.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 1:49 pm
 


Laura Adams Laura Adams:
It would be interesting to see how the numbers compared between the US and Canada in the era before 9/11 when fear-fuelled nationalism swept through the US. Noisy patriotism became fashionable, because if you weren't displaying the US flag on your person and in your business, and didn't know the words to "Proud to be an American" you were considered a bit suspect. It's not so scary now, but the conservatives are still very nationalistic. Add that to the general xenophobia and you get the numbers cited in the article above.



There's always been more of that upfront Americanisms, going back decades. Way more flags everywhere, etc. Actually we've moved a bit in that direction as well, either 'cause we always copy you guys, or because we have troops dying now and the world just feels less safe.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 3:30 pm
 


andyt andyt:


There's always been more of that upfront Americanisms, going back decades. Way more flags everywhere, etc. Actually we've moved a bit in that direction as well, either 'cause we always copy you guys, or because we have troops dying now and the world just feels less safe.



First thing I noticed my last trip back.

European Nationalism isn't what it used to be, for good reason most of it
has really been beaten out of them.

Schools, dropped the borders and unified the currency, just waiting for the
next generations to call themselves Europeans.

So perhaps not the best yardstick to measure by.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 4:42 pm
 


andyt andyt:
We are more modest about it, doesn't mean our identification isn't deep. We just don't wear it on our sleeves and go pushing it at everybody the way Americans do.


Trust me we have our yahoo's up here as well.

Ask what happens to the overwhelming amount of Americans when visiting Canada who gets into a conversation with a Canadian where their nationality is revealed. It often leads to the Canadian start babbling at the mouth like a freak'n idiot about how much Canada is better than the U.S. or how the U.S. sucks etc.

All this seems to be automatic by no prompting by the American at all.

If you reverse the roles you might get the American making the typical sterotypical remarks about Canada but for the most part it's all in good fun.

Regarding the topic that's one of the reasons I moved out of Québec because the riding I was living in is about to put the Bloc in power eventually and it's one riding that's so close to Ottawa and dependent on federal jobs that employs a large part of the population there. Hull/Aylmer has been Liberal since the beggining of time the fact the people are about to put the Bloc in there was a sign for me to get the hell out of Dodge.

The Bloc already have Gatineau. Two elections ago the Bloc were 4% away from wining Hull/Aylmer, the last election 2%.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:40 pm
 


Bodah Bodah:
Ask what happens to the overwhelming amount of Americans when visiting Canada who gets into a conversation with a Canadian where their nationality is revealed. It often leads to the Canadian start babbling at the mouth like a freak'n idiot about how much Canada is better than the U.S. or how the U.S. sucks etc.

All this seems to be automatic by no prompting by the American at all.

If you reverse the roles you might get the American making the typical sterotypical remarks about Canada but for the most part it's all in good fun.


If I could I'd rep u for this. This is, to me, our most embarrasssing national trait. Reminds me of the kind of bluster and put downs I expect from the insecure middle managment types.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:48 pm
 


So whats up with the Quebecers then ?


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 5:49 pm
 


On a sad personal note, wish there was some place I could call my own and be proud of :(


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 6:06 pm
 


Unsound Unsound:
Bodah Bodah:
Ask what happens to the overwhelming amount of Americans when visiting Canada who gets into a conversation with a Canadian where their nationality is revealed. It often leads to the Canadian start babbling at the mouth like a freak'n idiot about how much Canada is better than the U.S. or how the U.S. sucks etc.

All this seems to be automatic by no prompting by the American at all.

If you reverse the roles you might get the American making the typical sterotypical remarks about Canada but for the most part it's all in good fun.


If I could I'd rep u for this. This is, to me, our most embarrasssing national trait. Reminds me of the kind of bluster and put downs I expect from the insecure middle managment types.


Agreed. gnerally, most of the Americans I've met are of good manners (save those from southern California - I was rather surprised by what some of my sailors told me about run ins with them) every time some Canuck starts shooting their mouth off, you just want to slap him upside the head and tell 'em to shut it.


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 30, 2010 8:40 pm
 


desertdude desertdude:
So whats up with the Quebecers then ?



It's complicated.

The only thing I can tell you is that you can trace the gripes as far back as 1759 for some Québecers.


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canada is a my dream, my sister is from that, i miss her and canada


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 2011 7:42 am
 


desertdude desertdude:
On a sad personal note, wish there was some place I could call my own and be proud of :(


Complete your dream of immigrating to Canada or Australia. Nothing wrong with either place. [B-o]


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 2011 8:07 am
 


andyt andyt:
We are more modest about it, doesn't mean our identification isn't deep. We just don't wear it on our sleeves and go pushing it at everybody the way Americans do.

And, I've certainly lost some identification with Canada. To me a lot of it was the sense of space, of all that empty land. Now that we seem to be giving it all away to the natives, I don't really feel it's my land as much as I used to. I seem to have less rights to it than one specific race.


I would say we are more modest when compared to Americans, but compared to most other countries I've been to (about two dozen countries in Asia and Europe), they tend to be more low-key about their patriotism than we are generally.


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 2011 8:17 am
 


Bodah Bodah:
Trust me we have our yahoo's up here as well.

Ask what happens to the overwhelming amount of Americans when visiting Canada who gets into a conversation with a Canadian where their nationality is revealed. It often leads to the Canadian start babbling at the mouth like a freak'n idiot about how much Canada is better than the U.S. or how the U.S. sucks etc.

All this seems to be automatic by no prompting by the American at all.

If you reverse the roles you might get the American making the typical sterotypical remarks about Canada but for the most part it's all in good fun.


Perhaps you take it as good-natured ribbing, but others take offence to it, just as Americans take offence to our comments about gun rights, universal health care, etc. Maybe you are thicker-skinned than other people...

I think the number of yahoos on both sides of the borders are in equal proportions of the populace (say 1 in 20 are dumbasses - though that changes when alcohol enters the picture :D ).

I know a couple dozen Americans who are great people and have similar values and beliefs to most Canadians I know, but I've met some of their friends and there are yahoos amongst them who complain about out 'monopoly money', our socialist values, our high taxes, our crappy weather, etc. I personally take offence to being called a socialist, not because it is a bad term in my opinion, but because most American's use of the term is in a derogatory fashion.


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