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PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2021 6:47 pm
 


Indian agents had the power to do anything they wanted. They were the governments representative who managed day to day affairs of status Indians. They held that power till the 1960’s. There was no fighting an edict. If they wanted all your worldly possessions they took them didn’t even have to forge a will. Who are the courts going to believe some fine upstanding government officials or a dirty Indian. We were not allowed to hire a lawyer till the 1960’s so it couldn’t be fought.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2021 7:13 pm
 


I did not know about that.


-J.


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 05, 2021 8:22 pm
 


raydan raydan:
I'll put this here. For... reasons.

Image

There are people in Canada who react the same way to the residential schools as Americans do to the Tulsa Massacre. Either because they ignored it (it happened in their fucking lifetimes) or they're just plain stupid.

Either way, we can not let the this lesson have the same fate. Work with native groups to establish a curriculum to teach to students from now on. Face the fucked up things that were done head on and teach future generations how wrong it was and who is responsible.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 11:45 am
 


I had to step away from this thread for a few different reasons. Then I remembered how we as non-Native Canadians can truly help out, particularly in these cases.

In The Unjust Society, Harold Cardinal said that the best way white people could help was to send money. There are a lot of organizations out there working to support Indigenous people and culture who need all the help they can get. Here several that I recommend:

The Indian Residential School Survivors Society provides support to exactly the people it mentions in its name, as well as advocating justice and healing on their behalf.

The Legacy Of Hope Foundation works to create education and awareness about the impacts of the residential school system, including the traumatic aftereffects it had on many Indigenous people today.

The First Nations Caring Society works to support Indigenous youth and families, particularly in ensuring they can grow up safely in their own homes and take pride in their cultures.

Reconciliation Canada promotes reconciliation dialogue and actions in Canada, as well as making the public more aware of the shit Native people face in our country.

Indspire is an organization that provides financial aid to Native university students so they can develop their skills and build up themselves and their communities.


Last edited by JaredMilne on Sun Jun 06, 2021 8:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 12:11 pm
 


JaredMilne JaredMilne:
Then I remembered how we as settler Canadians can truly help out, particularly in these cases.


That's a very biased term, and as I've sad before, you need to speak for yourself and only yourself when using said term. You want to consider yourself a 'settler Canadian'? Fine, do that. Just don't paint others with that brush.

I'm not a 'settler'. I didn't arrive on a boat. I was born here, and I'll thank you to leave it at that.

-J.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 5:28 pm
 


Sorry, this area was 'settled' over 200 years ago. The people here are just "locals" regardless of race, colour or religion.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 5:34 pm
 


CDN_PATRIOT CDN_PATRIOT:
JaredMilne JaredMilne:
Then I remembered how we as settler Canadians can truly help out, particularly in these cases.


That's a very biased term, and as I've sad before, you need to speak for yourself and only yourself when using said term. You want to consider yourself a 'settler Canadian'? Fine, do that. Just don't paint others with that brush.

I'm not a 'settler'. I didn't arrive on a boat. I was born here, and I'll thank you to leave it at that.

-J.


This I agree with 100%. Call me a settler and any sympathy or willingness to help out dies pretty damn quick. It's a loaded term with only one aim in mind, to provoke undeserved guilt. And it usually backfires badly too, because when I see it or hear it all that happens is that I get very angry.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 8:57 pm
 


FWIW, I've revised it. I have my own hang-ups about the term and how it's applied, but I've used it in part because it's become increasingly commonly used and I'm not entirely sure what term to use that isn't "non-" something.


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 06, 2021 10:15 pm
 


Statue of Egerton Ryerson got torn down today in front of the school in Toronto. Sounds like something that was about a hundred and fifty years overdue. It just wasn't Native kids his idea of "structured education" tormented, and he thought the Natives weren't worth being trained for anything except agricultural labour. He thought that blind and deaf children were lazy and "indulging in idleness" and thought that black kids weren't worth educating at all. And for all of them he wanted the lash to never be spared.

Guess the biggest thing that needs to die is this retarded belief, from the likes of Jason Kenney for example, that the residential schools, and maybe even for all of the schooling for those who didn't come from wealthy families, was "good in intention, bad in implementation". Scratching under the surface, just with Ryerson, and it looks like this entire system was designed entirely by hyper-religious psychopaths as much (if not more) in love with violent & brutal "correction" of so-call wayward children than they were with giving them any sort of useful education. This is going to be bad when it's all said and done because at the outset it appears that the guiding principle of this nation's education systems was inspired by nothing but sadism and brutality in Canada's early years.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 3:53 am
 


JaredMilne JaredMilne:
I've used it in part because it's become increasingly commonly used


Increasingly used by who? And where? I don't hear anything of the sort where I am, nor have I ever that I can recall.

As for 'Non-native', that isn't much better at all, considering the definition of 'native':

0:
native.jpg
native.jpg [ 79.05 KiB | Viewed 1 time ]


By the loose definition of 'native', every single Canadian born in Canada could be described as native. Ever listen to 'O Canada'? More specifically the part that that describes our 'home and native land'?

You could have said 'First Nations' in your original paragraph, and no one would have questioned that whatsoever. Instead, you chose to inflame people instead of trying to actually make a valid point.


-J.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 6:18 am
 




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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 7:06 am
 


CDN_PATRIOT CDN_PATRIOT:

Increasingly used by who? And where? I don't hear anything of the sort where I am, nor have I ever that I can recall.

As for 'Non-native', that isn't much better at all, considering the definition of 'native':

0:
native.jpg


By the loose definition of 'native', every single Canadian born in Canada could be described as native. Ever listen to 'O Canada'? More specifically the part that that describes our 'home and native land'?

You could have said 'First Nations' in your original paragraph, and no one would have questioned that whatsoever. Instead, you chose to inflame people instead of trying to actually make a valid point.


-J.


Increasingly used by Indigenous writers. And using 'First Nations' would exclude the Metis and Inuit, who obviously aren't exempt from the racism Indigenous people face and were also put in residential schools.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 12:24 pm
 


JaredMilne JaredMilne:
FWIW, I've revised it. I have my own hang-ups about the term and how it's applied, but I've used it in part because it's become increasingly commonly used and I'm not entirely sure what term to use that isn't "non-" something.


Thank you. The problem is that 'settler' is used as a pejorative, almost racist term.

I find it just as offensive as the many horrible racist labels racist use to describe indigenous Canadians, and as the saying goes, two wrongs don't make a right.


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 07, 2021 2:42 pm
 


JaredMilne JaredMilne:
Increasingly used by Indigenous writers. And using 'First Nations' would exclude the Metis and Inuit


You could have said, "First Nations, Inuit, and Metis." All you need to do as admit you used a biased, racist term and move on. Coming up with substitutes and trying to deflect what you did is only making your case worse, as has been voiced by posters other than myself.

Fixing Canada starts with you.

-J.


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