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My Flag, My Anthem

Posted on Tuesday, November 07 at 15:52 by Subsandwich

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My Flag, My Anthem

by the late Eugene Berton, WWII Veteran

When you stand in front of your flag and listen to your anthem, what goes on before your mind's eye?

Possibly not much, because there is no immediate attachment.

You do not sense any pride, or should I say deep pride. Would you stand there with a tear in your eye and a swelling of your chest? Not likely.

There have been no events to make it so. On Remembrance Day as you stand in front of a cenotaph, what is seen in those memorials that should make you hold your breath? Not much.

Let's say, though that if you had been in another country, far away from home, and again if your life was in danger at the time and you heard your anthem, would it be different in your thoughts? I believe lots.

You would see in your mind's eye the ocean you crossed by ship or by air. You would see Canada as you remember from the maps. You would see your province, you would see your city or town or village. You would see your schools, the corner store, the old man or woman on their porch giving a little wave. You would see your parents, brothers and sisters or the entire family, and maybe a girl or boy which you really liked. You would go back to the earliest age that you could remember.

All this would flash in your mind's eye in a matter of seconds. This is what one misses and thinks about at such times when danger is prevalent, such as soldiers at war, people in danger of losing their lives or possibly close to dying.

To this day, as I stand in front of my flag and hear my anthem, I get a tear in my eye.

Also on Remembrance Day, I see all those young people who stood like me, and even the real tough ones, with that little glitter, a little sniffle.

That is why there was a certain bonding between these people even though you hardly knew them, and even though they came from different parts of the country. You stood together.

After you came back to all the things I mentioned, some of the ones we were standing with did not come back. There lies the sadness. There lies the reason for being here today. There lies my reason for talking with you. Cherish this moment in your thought the next time you hear your national anthem.

Written by the late Eugene Berton, WWII Veteran



Comments

  1. Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:03 pm
    This is beautiful - and so true. Every time I hear my national anthem, although I've never been to war, I cry. I can hardly even sing it, because I get so emotional and so filled with pride that I become overwhelmed.

    May the universe bless and keep all the brave men and women who are fighting in places like Afghanistan and Iraq...

    Signed,
    A very proud Canadian who cries when she hears the Canadian National Anthem

  2. Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:11 pm
    Which flag and anthem was it though? :P

  3. by avatar Tricks
    Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:33 pm
    R=UP

  4. Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:35 pm
    kinda cool actually very sad

  5. Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:38 pm
    great find R=UP

  6. Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:52 pm
    "Clogeroo" said
    Which flag and anthem was it though? :P


    I'm going to go out on a limb, here, and say you're joking around. Then, I'll giggle a little - but not much, because, in my opinion, what the article speaks of is more impacting today than people might realize. Then, I'll say that this means this isn't a joke, and the reality of it shouldn't be taken lightly.

    My grandfather was involved in both WWII and the Korean War. He was on the front lines, shooting live footage of our boys getting shot at and blown up. He risked his life every second of every day he spent on the field. Why? Because that's what his country wanted him to do.

    Personally - and maybe I'm being a tad oversensitive, here - I don't feel that it's appropriate to make light of something like this. It doesn't matter who's national anthem is being played; what matters is how people feel when they hear their national anthem.

  7. Sat Dec 09, 2006 6:37 pm
    I'm going to go out on a limb, here, and say you're joking around. Then, I'll giggle a little - but not much, because, in my opinion, what the article speaks of is more impacting today than people might realize. Then, I'll say that this means this isn't a joke, and the reality of it shouldn't be taken lightly.

    My grandfather was involved in both WWII and the Korean War. He was on the front lines, shooting live footage of our boys getting shot at and blown up. He risked his life every second of every day he spent on the field. Why? Because that's what his country wanted him to do.

    Personally - and maybe I'm being a tad oversensitive, here - I don't feel that it's appropriate to make light of something like this. It doesn't matter who's national anthem is being played; what matters is how people feel when they hear their national anthem.

    I mostly meant that a lot of veterans here still fly the red ensign and sing God Save the Queen. My grandfather was in the Second World War too he was in the mercantile marine and even got sunk by some Germans. I had a great uncle in the RAF and was killed over Germany. I have had lots of people in my family who served in the armed forces and currently serve.

  8. Sat Dec 09, 2006 7:04 pm
    Thanks for clarifying that for me, Clogeroo. I honestly wasn't certain whether you were joking around or serious or what. Thankyou. R=UP

  9. by lisel
    Sat Mar 03, 2007 12:13 am
    This was found after my father died...he never discussed his experiences of the war. It was a small insight into who he was...a little late though. We don't even know when it was written. He came from a small town in Ontario. I'm sure many men that came home from the war had the same feelings. I do remember that at his funeral which was attended by The Legion...an old fellow just saluted him and that brought tears to my eyes...



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